Quantum counterfeiters might succeed


quantum money
QUANTUM CASH Physicists have created quantum money by encoding data with light. The researchers transmitted a quantum version (right) of a real bill, an old Austrian banknote (left). Each grayscale shade in the quantum bill corresponds to a different photon polarization.

Scientists have created an ultrasecure form of money using quantum mechanics — and immediately demonstrated a potential security loophole.

Under ideal conditions, quantum currency is impossible to counterfeit. But thanks to the messiness of reality, a forger with access to sophisticated equipment could skirt that quantum security if banks don’t take appropriate precautions, scientists report March 1 in npj Quantum Information. Quantum money as a concept has been around since the 1970s, but this is the first time anyone has created and counterfeited quantum cash, says study coauthor Karel Lemr, a quantum physicist at Palacký University Olomouc in the Czech Republic.

Instead of paper banknotes, the researchers’ quantum bills are minted in light. To transfer funds, a series of photons — particles of light — would be transmitted to a bank using the photons’ polarizations, the orientation of their electromagnetic waves, to encode information. (The digital currency Bitcoin is similar in that there’s no bill you can hold in your hand. But quantum money has an extra layer of security, backed by the power of quantum mechanics.)

To illustrate their technique in a…

Sasha Harriet

Sasha Harriet

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Sasha Harriet

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