Why I Mute The World To Save My Brain


How often do you find yourself quietly on your own in this noisy world? Even when you’re at work, out of the 7 to 8 hours, how many of them are your own quiet hours?

A study at the University of California, Irvine, found that a typical office worker’s focused quiet time is only 11 minutes in-between interruptions on average,[1] and it actually takes 25 minutes to resume to work after any interruptions.

The noise and interruptions are badly affecting our work efficiency, and in fact, our life too.

Our brains will be overloaded and their normal functions can be affected with too much noise.

Psychologists examined the effects of the relocation of Munich’s airport on children’s health and cognition. They let the third- and fourth-grade students who lived and went to school near the old airport and near the new airport have tests on reading, memory, attention and hearing. Here’s the findings:[2]

The reading comprehension skills and long-term memory of children near the old airport improved once air traffic moved to the new airport, while the performance of children near the new airport declined.

Even though you may not be always working under excessive noise in your office, noise still interrupt the functioning of your brain to some extent.

Our brains get stimulated by sound, and too much noise can overload our brains with stimulating chemicals, affecting our comprehension skills…

Sasha Harriet

Sasha Harriet

As content editor, I get to do what I love everyday. Tweet, share and promote the best content our tools find on a daily basis.

I have a crazy passion for #music, #celebrity #news & #fashion! I'm always out and about on Twitter.
Sasha Harriet

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