6 Things You Need To Get Right About Depression


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One of the more surprising, and upsetting, uses of social media has been suicides performed on Facebook Live. Though reasons for suicide are complex, the mere threat is often a cry for help, acceptance, or recognition. During the two years I worked as a patient monitor in an emergency room, I discovered most people that attempt to take their own lives desire a pair of ears to listen to their problems more than anything else.

Depression, Serotonin, and the Mind-Gut Connection Emeran Mayer

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Depression, Serotonin, and the Mind-Gut Connection

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Emeran Mayer

Professor of Medicine at UCLA

08:18

It’s hard to gauge a person’s reality based on social media habits, however. Those who spout vitriolic rhetoric are often quite approachable and reserved in person. We can’t read inflections and temperament from words on a screen, or take into consideration that the person might just be having a bad day.

That said, social media can be a powerful indicator of those at risk for suffering from mental health disorders, a new study published in Scientific Reports shows. A team led by Andrew Reece, in the Department of Psychology at Harvard, collected Twitter data from 204 individuals. Of those, 105 suffered from depression, with a control of 99 healthy subjects. The team then used a supervised learning algorithm to see if changes in language predicted clinical depression.

The answer is yes. Depressed patients used more words like death, no, and never, while posting fewer positive words—like happy, beach, and photo—in the lead-up to their diagnosis.

Figure 4. Depression word-shift graph revealing contributions to difference in Twitter happiness observed between depressed (5.98) and healthy (6.11) participants. In column 3, (−) indicates a relatively negative word, and (+)…

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