Study Finds Huge Cognitive Benefits to Getting Married


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Scientists have long observed that there are many potential benefits of married life. One of their most popular findings perhaps pertains to the longevity advantage married people, and particularly men, have over their never married, divorced or widowed peers.

Studies point to many social-cognitive, emotional, behavioral and biological benefits that marriage seems to bestow on its participants. For example, being married is related to improved cancer survival. Being married has also been linked to better cognitive function, a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease, improved blood sugar levels, and better outcomes for hospitalized patients.

Will Everyone Get Alzheimer’s If They Live Long Enough? Dr. Samuel Gandy

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Will Everyone Get Alzheimer’s If They Live Long Enough?

Dr. Samuel Gandy

Associate Director, Mount Sinai Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center

05:30

Now a new meta-analysis led by psychiatrist Andrew Sommerlad from University College London and published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, has found that single people were 42% more likely overall to develop dementia than married individuals. The risk for widowed people was 20% higher while, interestingly, researchers found no evidence for an increased risk of dementia in divorced people.

Dementia is a rising global public health problem. There were an estimated 50 million people with dementia in 2017 and according to the World Alzheimer Report, this number will almost double every…

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Marcela

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COO @oneqube | Angel Investor | Proud mom | Advisor @TheTutuProject | Let's Go #NYRangers
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