These Marine Bacteria Can Change Their Colors in Different Types of Light


Scientists looked at the genetic compositing of Synechococcus cyanobacteria and discovered a gene that allows them to change color in different types of light.
Scientists looked at the genetic compositing of Synechococcus cyanobacteria and discovered a gene that allows them to change color in different types of light.

As painters such as J.M.W. Turner or Claude Monet knew well, the ocean can come in myriad different colors, from royal blue to dark grey and emerald green. That’s because of the different ways in which water absorbs sunlight. On a sunny day, the ocean looks blue because water absorbs colors in the red part of the light spectrum, so all that we see is what’s left behind in the blue light spectrum.

Much of this light absorption is carried out by microscopic marine algae called phytoplankton that, much like plants do on land, use chlorophyll to carry out photosynthesis, turning light energy into chemical energy that can be used to sustain life in the ocean.

Sasha Harriet

Sasha Harriet

As content editor, I get to do what I love everyday. Tweet, share and promote the best content our tools find on a daily basis.

I have a crazy passion for #music, #celebrity #news & #fashion! I'm always out and about on Twitter.
Sasha Harriet

Latest posts by Sasha Harriet (see all)


More from Around the Web

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news from our network of site partners.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Pin It on Pinterest