Should You Finance a Tiny Home With a Credit Card?

Should You Finance a Tiny Home With a Credit Card?

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Mitchell says that he’s been in his tiny home for almost five years and pays only $15 per month in utilities.
Financing options The relatively low cost of tiny home living opens the door to a world of possibilities when it comes to financing, but the type of loan you’ll need depends on the tiny home you buy.
(See also: 9 Things to Consider Before Retiring to a Tiny Home or RV) Mortgage According to Fred Glick, CEO of U.S. Loans Mortgage Inc., homeowners who want to buy a small home that is permanently affixed to a foundation and sold with a lot will need to apply for a traditional mortgage for their tiny home unless they have the cash to pay for it outright.
Personal loan Personal loans are also popular when it comes to financing tiny homes.
What about paying with a credit card?
While there are several financing methods for tiny homes, Mitchell notes that some consumers who build or buy a tiny home seek out credit cards that offer 0% APR on purchases — at least for a limited time.
Risks of financing with a credit card One of the biggest downsides to using a credit card to pay for a tiny home is the very obvious potential for debt.
Mitchell says that the majority of people who opt to live in a tiny home don’t want debt in their lives, so using a credit card might work against their goals, unless they had a very specific plan to pay it off.
Since the average credit card interest rate is now around 17%, you’ll also pay a lot of interest if you finance a tiny home with a regular credit card and pay it off over time.

Selena Gomez Reveals You ‘Can Never Forget Someone’ As Justin Bieber & Hailey Baldwin Plan Wedding

Selena Gomez Reveals You ‘Can Never Forget Someone’ As Justin Bieber & Hailey Baldwin Plan Wedding

Selena Gomez was asked how you can forget an old romantic partner & her answer contains some great advice.
“You can’t really just like forget someone,” Selena answered.
“You kind of have to just figure out why you’re still holding on to them.
Like why do you want to forget them?
And then I think that’s where you start.
Ask yourself that question, like why do you want to forget them?
And did they hurt you?
Watch her answer the question in the video below!
Sometimes you might need to be reminded of something.
The two recently checked into the Belmond Hotel Caruso in Ravello, Italy, which reportedly offers rooms at the expensive price of $13,000 a night.

What Causes Chemtrails?

What Causes Chemtrails?

These droplets may even freeze if the air temperature is cold enough; but either way, the result will be a usually very short-lived streak of water vapor behind the plane.
In this case, you’ll see spiraling, corkscrew looking vapor trailing the plane’s wing tips.
As in the other cases, this is caused by a drop in air pressure resulting in water condensing in the intake, creating something of a little cloud inside said intake.
All this said, these types of contrails aren’t the ones you’re seeing when you look up high in the sky as commercial planes fly over head.
So what about the far more commonly observed contrails streaming behind planes flying at high altitude?
These are a byproduct of burning jet fuel in air that is extremely cold, though otherwise aren’t really any different than the former contrails- they’re both caused by water condensing, just in one case it’s the water already in the atmosphere condensing, and in the other it’s water that’s introduced into the air.
When at high altitude where temperatures are often well below freezing, this expelled water vapor, combined with the various particles also expelled providing nucleation sites for the water, will sometimes condense and then freeze, with the result being a long, white cloud formation behind the plane.
This tendency of contrails to stick around for long periods of time is also a phenomenon that’s been regularly observed from the earliest days of high altitude flight.
Not long after, he passed out, only regaining consciousness a few thousand feet above the ground, at which point he was successfully able to pull out of the dive and land, despite his vision being damaged- it turns out partially permanently.
Other efforts by the military have been put forth to try to stop contrails from forming via tweaking the makeup of the fuel, so as to produce less particles in the exhaust, and thus less nucleation sites for the water vapor to condense around.

Cybernetics Pioneer Norbert Wiener on the Malady of “Content” and How to Save Creative Culture from the Syphoning of Substance

Cybernetics Pioneer Norbert Wiener on the Malady of “Content” and How to Save Creative Culture from the Syphoning of Substance

“Our task is not to find the maximum amount of content in a work of art,” Susan Sontag wrote in 1964.
“Our task is to cut back content so that we can see the thing at all.” I have thought about Sontag’s prescience again and again in my decade-plus on the internet, watching creative culture reduced to mere “content” as the life of the mind and world of substantive ideas collapse into an abyss of marketable sensationalism and cynicism; watching the cowardice of clickbaitable outrage eclipse the courage — at this point a countercultural courage — to create rather than tear down, to refuse to flatten life’s nuance, complexity, and dimensionality into simplistic binaries, to grow the container that holds our understanding of the world rather than purvey its continually cheapened “content.” More than a decade before Sontag and more than half a century before the social web as we know it, the mathematician, philosopher, and cybernetics pioneer Norbert Wiener (November 26, 1894–March 18, 1964) offered a prescient admonition against this tendency in The Human Use of Human Beings: Cybernetics and Society (public library) — his visionary 1950 treatise on communication, control, and the moral dimension of technology, which went on to influence thinkers as diverse as beloved author Kurt Vonnegut, anthropologist Mary Catherine Bateson, and virtual reality pioneer Jaron Lanier.
In a sentiment that applies with striking precision to the cultural economics of the Internet, Wiener writes: The newspaper business has come to be the art of saying less and less to more and more… [This] applies equally to the radio, to television, and even to bookselling.
Thus we are in an age where the enormous per capita bulk of communication is met by an ever-thinning stream of total bulk of communication.
More and more we must accept a standardized inoffensive and insignificant product which, like the white bread of the bakeries, is made rather for its keeping and selling properties than for its food value.
This is fundamentally an external handicap of modern communication, but it is paralleled by another which gnaws from within.
This is the cancer of creative narrowness and feebleness.
Wiener locates the source of this “creative narrowness and feebleness” in the hijacking of the impetus for and innate rewards of creative work by the Skinner box of external affirmation — the prestige, acclaim, visibility, and commendation that come all the more readily today via the compulsive lever of social media, with its ceaseless supply of likes, retweets, shares, and other pellets of rapidly metabolized but hardly nutritious affirmation.
Wiener writes: The artist, the writer, and the scientist should be moved by such an irresistible impulse to create that, even if they were not being paid for their work, they would be willing to pay to get the chance to do it.
Heaven save us from the first novels which are written because a young man desires the prestige of being a novelist rather than because he has something to say!

Saturday Night Live star responds to Chevy Chase slamming show

Saturday Night Live star responds to Chevy Chase slamming show

One recent Saturday Night Live cast member is responding to Chevy Chase slamming the current edition of the NBC late-night series — and his reaction might surprise you.
As you’ll recall, Chase, who was a founding member of SNL, told The Washington Post last week the sketch comedy show returning for its 44th season “means a whole generation of s—heads laughs at the worst f—ing humor in the world.… How could you dare give that generation worse s— than they already have in their lives?
It just drives me nuts.” Chase suggested SNL has gone downhill after he exited during the show’s second season.
“Why am I saying that?
I guess.” Now Taran Killam, who was on the show from 2010 to 2016, is weighing in on the subject with a surprisingly agreeable take.
“It’s at best uneven,” Killam told Fox News at the iHeartRadio Music Festival in Las Vegas on Saturday.
“I think for comedy to stay important and relevant it needs to evolve and it needs to change over time, so I certainly understand if the comedy that [Chase has] been watching since he left is not to his liking, but I certainly don’t disagree that it hasn’t been as good since the first two seasons or that first one season he was on because I own that box DVD set.” Killam added that it’s rather difficult to improve the show.
“The tricky thing about SNL is, unless you participate in it, it’s really hard to explain how difficult, and complicated, and chaotic the process can be,” he said.
“But as soon as you’re on the inside, you understand how miraculous it is that the show even gets put together and airs on time.
So, I give the show all the credit in the world for trying to adapt and change.… I think any show that’s been on for 44 seasons now and still has people tuning in is probably doing more things right than wrong.” SNL returns Sept. 29.

Kanye West and Saint Throw First Pitch at Chicago Cubs-White Sox Game

Kanye West and Saint Throw First Pitch at Chicago Cubs-White Sox Game

Kanye West made the most of his Chicago homecoming week by capping it off with a visit to the mound with his son, Saint, and two tosses to kick off a crosstown classic rubber match.
Ye and Saint were assigned to throw out the first pitch(es) Sunday for game 3 of the Chicago Cubs and White Sox series at Guaranteed Rate Field.
Saint pitched first (getting as far as he could) … and his pops followed up with a throw that made it to home plate.
Just the day before, Kanye took Saint out for a boys night out at The Sugar Factory, where they appeared to be getting their nosh on.
Looks like Yeezy didn’t want to miss out on a mirror shot with his boy.
Kanye’s been in Chicago since at least Monday, and his latest excursions come on the heels of his announcement that he’s moving back to his hometown and “never leaving again.”
We’re told he plans to move his Yeezy offices from Calabasas to Chi-Town … but still maintain his properties in L.A. No doubt about it … Kanye thinks about Chicago a little more than now and then these days.

Podcast Episode 218: Lost in the Amazon

Podcast Episode 218: Lost in the Amazon

In this week’s episode we’ll follow Isabel Godin des Odonais on her harrowing adventure in the rain forest.
Sources for our feature on Isabel Godin des Odonais: Anthony Smith, The Lost Lady of the Amazon, 2003.
J. Donald Fernie, “Marginalia: The Shape of the Earth, Part II,” American Scientist 79:5 (September/October 1991), 393-395.
David Taylor, “An Adventure of Historic Measures,” Americas 50:6 (November/December 1998), 14-21.
“An Account of the Singular Misfortunes of Madame Godin, in a Voyage Which She Made From the Province of Quito to Cayenne, by the River of the Amazons,” New Wonderful Magazine and Marvellous Chronicle 4:37 (July 1794), 309-313.
Listener mail: Robert Plummer, “Giving Everyone in the World an Address,” BBC News, April 30, 2015.
“Ivory Coast Post Office Adopts Three-Word System,” BBC News, Dec. 9, 2016.
This week’s lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Josva Dammann Kvilstad, who sent this corroborating link (warning — this spoils the puzzle).
You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on Google Podcasts, on Apple Podcasts, or via the RSS feed at https://futilitycloset.libsyn.com/rss.
Thanks for listening!

Review: JBL Link View

Review: JBL Link View

The Link View is JBL’s first smart … screen with Google Assistant.
First and foremost, the Link View is a speaker with some impressive audio powers.
I don’t think I’d recommend either the Amazon Echo Show or Lenovo Smart Display just for music, but this JBL sounds awesome in comparison.
Google’s Home Assistant interface is identical no matter which device you buy, so the Link View has a solid software foundation.
When you wake it up, it shows you weather and has a menu of possible commands you can ask it.
(Dig into the Google Home app and navigate to your device’s Settings > Accessibility > Play Start Sound to enable the audible tone.)
Like Lenovo, JBL built in a camera cover toggle.
It’s Google’s.
And despite working on non-screened Google Assistant devices, Netflix doesn’t recognize the Link View (or Lenovo Smart Display) at all.
At $250, the JBL Link View is $50 more expensive than Lenovo’s 8-inch Smart Display.

Artificial Intelligence Has a Strange New Muse: Our Sense of Smell

Artificial Intelligence Has a Strange New Muse: Our Sense of Smell

But we know biological systems don’t need all that — that they can handle difficult problems that deep nets can’t right now.” Take a hot topic in AI: self-driving cars.
It was the system that scientists understood best, with clear applications to image-based machine learning tasks.
But “every type of stimulus doesn’t get processed in the same way,” said Saket Navlakha, a computer scientist at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California.
You have all this extra space to play around with and structure your data.” Once the fly’s olfactory circuit has done that, it needs to figure out a way to identify distinct odors with non-overlapping neurons.
Navlakha created an olfactory-based similarity search algorithm and applied it to data sets of images.
And Nowotny is examining how the olfactory system processes mixtures.
Nowotny and his team have found that separable odors aren’t perceived at the same time; rather, the coffee and croissant odors are processed very rapidly in alternation.
“Some different kind of structure is being pulled out by the moth brain, and having that different kind of structure helps the machine learning algorithm.” Some researchers now hope to also use studies in olfaction to figure out how multiple forms of learning can be coordinated in deeper networks.
“I’m not quite sure how to improve deep learning systems at the moment.” One place to start could lie not only in implementing olfaction-based architecture but also in figuring out how to define the system’s inputs.
Nor can structural correlations provide a reliable bearing: Odors with similar chemical structures can be perceived as very different, and odors with very different chemical structures can be perceived as similar.

In Defense of Amazon’s Alexa Microwave

In Defense of Amazon’s Alexa Microwave

In demos, Amazon showed how you could ask to cook “one potato,” commanding the microwave to heat a potato like only a microwave can.
But if Amazon gets it right, a voice-controlled microwave could bring this dated device into the 21st century.
In 2014, Quartz dug into what it saw as the slow death of the microwave oven, pinning the lack of growth on a lot of possible culprits, from healthy eating to toaster ovens.
These handy presets can make the cheese on a slice of pizza melt rather than go rubbery, or heat two cups of frozen vegetables just right.
It’s no wonder that most frozen meals just say “heat on high for three minutes.” Every microwave has different presets with different button combinations that do different things.
Standard microwaves can’t learn new tricks, but Alexa can.
It’ll be no time before Google introduces one of its own.
Overzealous data logging is a problem with almost every new connected device—and a microwave might not benefit us enough to make the privacy tradeoff worth it.
At $60, the AmazonBasics Microwave is nearly half the price of some competitors.
If Alexa succeeds, and I can forget how long it takes to cook a potato or the mind-numbing button combination I need to defrost veggies in the microwave, count me in.

How Lego Came to Be the World’s Most Famous Brick

How Lego Came to Be the World’s Most Famous Brick

When Ole Kirk Kristiansen imported a newfangled contraption called a plastic-injection-molding machine to Denmark in 1946, people thought he’d lost his mind.
Kirk Kristiansen was a master carpenter who made wooden toys sold under the brand name Lego (abbreviated from leg godt, Danish for “play well”).
The machine cost nearly 7 percent of the company’s annual revenue, but Kirk Kristiansen reckoned there was no limit to what he could manufacture with the new technology.
He could even redesign old-fashioned building blocks so that they wouldn’t topple over.
After making modest progress with interlocking indentations—a concept borrowed from another toy manufacturer—Ole’s son, Godtfred, set to work on a mechanism for binding blocks together.
After years of trial and error, he perfected the stud-and-tube coupling system that defines Lego to this day.
The system required the molding process to be accurate to within 0.005 mm.
Godtfred filed for a patent the year Ole died.
Countless variations on the form followed over the decades—from roof tiles to Jedi weaponry—all of which can click with bricks from the Eisenhower era.
Some 700 billion Lego pieces later, the result is a toy that never gets old.

We shouldn’t market to people’s past — we need real-time, location-based strategies

We shouldn’t market to people’s past — we need real-time, location-based strategies

When sports analytics folks crunch the numbers behind professional athlete’s batting, pitching, throwing and dunking, they are looking at past performance to better predict future behavior.
Connecting to the kinetic While we wholly accept that data surrounding your personal buying or leisure pursuits can be great predictors of future behavior, people do indeed evolve.
Unlike professional athletes, you and I (again, LeBron, stop reading) live in a completely opposite world.
Location-based marketing relies on geo-targeting.
For example, … It’s 8PM on a Friday and you’ve opted in on platform X to receive offers from “bars near me” because you’re always up for a cold one.
In addition to “I’m in a bar with a terrace, drinking a beer and the sun is shining,” on my way I walked my dog, passed by a trash bin and dumped the pooch’s poop before I hit the bar.
With enough data, trends emerge, such as going for a beer after walking the dog instead of coffee (= example).
This means that walking the dog is an indicator for potential beer sales.
By encouraging dog walking the beer brand sells more beer!
Currently media agencies focus on target groups but aren’t yet able to see the dog-walking —> beer link.

Internal memo from Google’s CEO insists search results are free from political bias

Internal memo from Google’s CEO insists search results are free from political bias

Image: Jeff Chiu/AP/REX/Shutterstock Google chief Sundar Pichai wants the people working for him to understand this clearly: Google’s search results aren’t influenced by political bias.
A Thursday report from the Wall Street Journal noted that, in early 2017, employees talked about using Google’s search features to respond to Trump’s controversial travel ban that focused on predominantly Muslim countries.
They sought a way to push back against “islamophobic, algorithmically biased results from search terms ‘Islam’, ‘Muslim’, ‘Iran’, etc.”
and “prejudiced, algorithmically biased search results from search terms ‘Mexico’, ‘Hispanic’, ‘Latino’, etc.”
The spokesperson referred to the chain as “a brainstorm of ideas, none of which were ever implemented.”
The statement continued: “Google has never manipulated its search results or modified any of its products to promote a particular political ideology—not in the current campaign season, not during the 2016 election, and not in the aftermath of President Trump’s executive order on immigration.
Pichai’s memo apparently strikes a similar tone.
A New York Times report reveals that he shut down any notion of Google engaging in political activities. “Recent news stories reference an internal email to suggest that we would compromise the integrity of our Search results for a political end.
This is absolutely false,” Pichai wrote.

This Pinball Game Doesn’t Come In A Box… It Is The Box

This Pinball Game Doesn’t Come In A Box… It Is The Box

The secret sauce is that sense of movement and feedback, and the loss of control as the ball makes its way through the play field under the power of gravity.
Of course the real problem is finding a pinball machine.
Pinbox 3000 is swooping in to fix that in a creative way.
We ran into them at Maker Faire New York over the weekend and the booth was packed with kids and adults all mashing flippers to keep a marble in play.
The design is quite clever, with materials limited to just cardboard, rubber bands, and a few plastic rivets.
Both the plunger that launches the pinball and the flippers are surprisingly robust.
They stand up to a lot of force and from the models on display it seems the friction points of cardboard-on-cardboard are the issue, rather than mechanisms buckling under the force exerted by the player.
When first assembled the playfield is blank.
That didn’t stop the fun for this set of kits stacked back to back for player vs. player action.
There’s a hole at the top of playfields which makes this feel a bit like playing Pong in real life.

Send Smooches over Skype with the Kiss Interface

Send Smooches over Skype with the Kiss Interface

This project of [Nathan]’s certainly has a playful straightforwardness about it.
His Skype ‘Kiss’ Interface has a simple job: to try to create a more intuitive way to express affection within the limits of using Skype.
It all came about from a long distance relationship for which the chat program was the main means of communicating.
Seeking a more intuitive and personal means of expressing some basic affection, [Nathan] created a capacitive touch sensor that, when touched with the lips, sends the key combination for either a kissy face emoji or the red lips emoji, depending on the duration.
Capacitive touch sensing allows for triggering the sensor without actually physically touching one’s lips to the electrodes, which [Nathan] did by putting a clear plastic layer over the PCB traces.
His board uses an STM32 microcontroller with software handling the USB HID and STM’s TSC (Touch Sensing Controller) functionality.
As a result, the board has few components and a simple interface, which was in keeping with the goal of rejecting feature creep and focusing on a simple task.
Clearly the unit works; but how well does it actually fulfill its intended purpose?
We don’t know that yet, but we do know that [Nathan] seems to have everything he needs in order to find out.
Either way, it’s a fun project that definitely fits the spirit of the Human-Computer Interface Challenge of The Hackaday Prize.

Prince George and Princess Charlotte Steal the Spotlight Again As Pageboy and Bridesmaid

Prince George and Princess Charlotte Steal the Spotlight Again As Pageboy and Bridesmaid

A family affair.
Prince George and Princess Charlotte reprised their roles as pageboy and bridesmaid for the third time on Saturday, September 22, at the wedding Sophie Carter — a close friend of the Duchess of Cambridge — and Robert Snuggs in Norfolk, England.
Prince William and Kate Middleton’s son, 5, and daughter, 3, were previously part of the bridal party at Prince Harry‘s May 19 wedding to Duchess Meghan and Pippa Middleton’s 2017 nuptials to James Matthews.
The young prince and princess — who clung to her mother’s side as she held her close — posed for photos with the newlyweds at St. Andrews Episcopal Church along with the rest of the pint-sized bridal party.
Charlotte wore a white dress with a smoked bodice and ruffled collar along with a green-and-white flower crown and carried a small posy and a blue silk clutch, while George was dressed in a double-breasted white shirt that was teamed with baby blue cutoff pants with white tights and matching loafers.
Clothing designer Amaia Kids posted a now-deleted photo of the four pageboys and three bridesmaids’ outfits on Instagram on Sunday, September 23, showing the clothes on hangers with the names George and Charlotte scrawled onto two of the pieces.
Kate, meanwhile, dressed in the same bright blue Catherine Walker coatdress she wore on tour in Germany in 2017 and a matching fascinator with floral embellishments.
Her husband also looked dapper in a black suit jacket, a blue dress shirt, and a white rose pinned to his lapel.
Missing from the nuptials of Charlotte’s godmother were the couple’s youngest child, Prince Louis, 5 months, and Pippa, who is expecting her first child with Matthews.
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Michael Moore’s ‘Fahrenheit 11/9’ falls flat at the box office with dismal $3 million opening

Michael Moore’s ‘Fahrenheit 11/9’ falls flat at the box office with dismal $3 million opening

Michael Moore’s latest anti-Republican documentary tanked at the box office compared to his movies from a decade ago, as “Fahrenheit 11/9” barely registered with a $3.1 million take on its first weekend.
The latest film, as Fox News previously reported, sought to do the same to President Trump at a key time for the country: the 2018 midterm elections.
“Fahrenheit 11/9” took in $3.1 million in 1,719 cinemas — a large debut for most documentaries but a fraction of the $23.9 million opening of “Fahrenheit 9/11.” That film went on to make $222.4 million worldwide, a record for documentaries.
ComScore’s PostTrak survey found that 82 percent of viewers gave it four out of five stars.
It landed an “A” CinemaScore.
“Those who did see it really enjoyed it,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore.
“People have said: Should they have gone limited?
It’s one of the most difficult types of films to release.” Last month, Moore, whose 2002 documentary “Bowling for Columbine” won an Oscar, made headlines when the trailer for “Fahrenheit 11/9” referred to Trump as “the last president of the United States.” The anti-Trump filmmaker sat down with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes, who asked Moore about the bold claim.
It was easily the biggest draw on a quiet weekend at North American movie theaters, where the other new wide releases all disappointed or downright flopped.
Dan Fogelman’s “Life Itself” and the home invasion thriller “Assassination Nation” both barely made a blip in nationwide release.

Jay-Z & Beyonce Watch Break Dancers at OTR II Rose Bowl After Party

Jay-Z & Beyonce Watch Break Dancers at OTR II Rose Bowl After Party

During Epic Break Dance-Off Jay-Z and Beyonce normally give folks a front row seat to a sick performance, but they switched it up Saturday after their Rose Bowl concert and became spectators themselves.
Jay & Bey were seen at an after-party thrown on the heels of their show in Pasadena, where they sold out the Rose Bowl for night 1 of 2 of their last couple performances in L.A. Their ‘On The Run II’ summer tour wraps in Seattle next week.
During the shindig, two break dancers were putting on their best moves in front the couple … and they did not disappoint.
Check out Beyonce’s reaction — she’s definitely into it.
Never hurts to impress Queen Bey … we know she could always use more dancers.
It’s a nice change of pace for Jay and Bey, who’ve been putting quite a run together for some very famous audience members these last few months.
Some A-listers who’ve enjoyed their OTR II tour … Dez Bryant and Jerry Jones, Justin Verlander and Kate Upton … and, of course, the Obamas.
It’s like Jay once said … after the show, it’s the after-party … where we’ll take in a show and break dancers are gnarly.
That’s how that goes, right?

How to Find Hidden Cameras

How to Find Hidden Cameras

Place a cell phone call and listen for interference.
Corners of rooms often provide the best picture of the whole room, though cameras placed in the corner are often less inconspicuous than most hidden cameras.
[2] You can check to see if a mirror is a two-way to confirm whether or not a camera is embedded.
5 Check stuffed animals and clocks.
Since both stuffed animals and clocks are easy to move, consider removing them from your vicinity if you suspect that they house cameras.
6 Turn off the lights to search for camera indicators.
Chances are slim that anyone who installed hidden cameras was too sloppy to hide the camera’s indicator lights, so don’t rule out hidden cameras if you don’t see any.
8 Use your cell phone to scan for interference.
An RF detector allows you to scan for hidden cameras by physically sweeping the detector around a room and listening for feedback; if you hear sudden crackling or beeping through the detector, there’s a good chance you’ll find a hidden camera in front of it.
10 Search for public cameras.

‘Silly Walks’ Road Sign Encourages Crossing In Style (Hidden Camera Video is Hilarious)

‘Silly Walks’ Road Sign Encourages Crossing In Style (Hidden Camera Video is Hilarious)

In Ojre, Norway, pedestrians crossing the street have been encouraged—by an official-looking street sign—to show off their best silly walk.
The art installation was an homage to Monty Python and its co-founder, the tall, lanky John Cleese.
Reidar Johannes Søby from the Kreativiteket art group told local broadcaster NRK that it was just for fun.
“There’s no deep thought behind it,” he said.
They said the signs should be taken down.
However, the Mayor of Marker Municipality, Kjersti Nythe Nilsen, apparently does have a sense of humor—and a little rebel inside her.
They are not any nuisance and are very similar to normal pedestrian crossing signs.
In fact, no one has noticed that we have changed them, after all, they have been there a couple of months,” she said.
She said that despite the threat from the Norwegian Public Roads Administration, she has no plans to remove the signs and feels she must resort to a little civil disobedience.
The idea also spread to Ottawa, Canada—and we think a Silly Walks sign is just the remedy for boring commutes the world over.

A controversial theory claims present, past, and future exist at the same time

A controversial theory claims present, past, and future exist at the same time

Time may not be passing at all, says the Block Universe Theory.
But what if your present, past, and future all existed already?
In the block universe, there is no “now” or present.
All moments that exist are just relative to each other within the three spacial dimensions and one time dimension.
This is because your past is always simultaneously someone else’s future.
So if you travel to the past, you’re just making that future the way it is. ‘If I travel to the past, I am part of the past,” said Miller. “For all we know, the reason the past is the way it is, is in part due to the presence of time travelers,” added Miller.
Answering that is the “evolving block universe” model which sees the block of the universal space-time growing rather than staying the same.
While the debates are going to continue, the block universe theory is one of the most promising approaches that can reconcile the cosmological view of time with our everyday experience.

Six disastrous encounters with the world’s most hostile uncontacted tribe

Six disastrous encounters with the world’s most hostile uncontacted tribe

1970: India explores its new lands When India gained its independence from Britain, many islands in the area were handed over to India as well, including North Sentinel Island.
In 1970, however, Pandit’s ship strayed too close to the beaches of the island.
As the police deposited the crew’s gifts on the shore, another volley of arrows issued from the tree line.
The Sentinelese were constructing boats to sail to the coral reef where the Primrose had run aground.
1991: Pandit makes progress Triloknath Pandit continued to make attempts at contact after his 1970 visit.
Despite the progress, the Sentinelese made it clear that there were limits to what outsiders could and could not do.
The dinghy was brought back to shore, and Pandit sailed off again.
2006: Drunk poachers stray too close Soon after Pandit’s successful visit, the Indian government began enforcing an exclusion zone around the island, with heavy fines and jail time to act as deterrents.
As the men slept, their boat drifted into the coral reefs surrounding the island.
While curiosity about the tribe remains strong, curiosity appears to be the only real reason left to make contact.

The Prison-Industrial Complex: Profiteering off of Locking People Away

The Prison-Industrial Complex: Profiteering off of Locking People Away

If you’ve never heard of the prison-industrial complex, you aren’t the only one.
The origins of modern convict labor go all the way back to the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which finally banned slavery.
The exact words of the amendment are: Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
Right smack in the middle there is a big loophole – if you’ve been convicted of a crime, you can be forced into labor.
The practice was called ‘convict leasing’, and it allowed state governments to add huge sums to their coffers – in 1898, nearly 75% of Alabama’s state revenue came from leasing convict labor.
Conditions for leased convicts were so horrifically bad that they were 10 times more likely to die than un-leased convicts.
Photo Credit: Public Domain Though you might think the brutal ways of the Jim-Crow-era convict leasing are of the past, in some ways, they’re not at all.
Today, prisoners are still forced to work under pain of punishment (usually solitary confinement, aka ‘segregation’), sometimes in fields or in mines, and in many instances they’re paid pennies an hour.
And starting with Nixon’s racist drug laws and continuing through Reagan’s mandatory minimums and Clinton’s 3-strike law, the prison population exploded, filling disproportionately with minorities – particularly African Americans.
Though the U.S. prison population has started to decline in the past few years, it is still astronomically high.

The neuroscience behind ‘gut feelings’

The neuroscience behind ‘gut feelings’

There is such a thing in neuroscience as a ‘gut feeling.’
We don’t quite know what it’s saying yet, but we have an idea. “Gut signals are transmitted at epithelial-neural synapses through the release of … serotonin.”
Have you ever had a ‘gut feeling?’
That moment when you just knew?
Historically, it was believed that the stomach communicated with the brain indirectly — typically through something called neuropeptide signaling (peptides are like proteins but smaller; neurons use neuropeptides to communicate); however, the results from this study suggest something much more direct, much more nuanced, and a little bit more complicated.
Let’s break that down — first by quoting the National Institute of Health: “Epithelial cells form barriers that separate different biological compartments in the body.”
A neurotransmitter is a chemical that is released when a signal arrives from somewhere else in the body and acts as a bridge for the signal to move from one neuron to the next.
What makes the result of the study noteworthy is the fact that — in addition to neuropeptides — “further studies revealed that enteroendocrine cells activate sensory neurons within tens to hundreds of milliseconds, a time scale typical of synaptic transmission rather than neuropeptide signaling.”
Perhaps the answer is already known to someone deep within the depths of their gut.

Caring Ambulance Workers Take Detour to Grant Dying Man’s Simple Ice Cream Wish

Caring Ambulance Workers Take Detour to Grant Dying Man’s Simple Ice Cream Wish

Thanks to the attention and kindness of two Australian ambulance workers, a dying man was able to have the last meal he most desired.
After 17 years of fighting pancreatic cancer, Ron McCartney was set to be taken into palliative care earlier this month.
His wife Sharon, however, needed to call for a medical escort after her husband’s sickness took a bad turn.
While the Queensland paramedics conducted an evaluation in the ambulance, they discovered that the 72-year-old had not been eating for several days.
The two paramedics, identified only as Kate and Hanna, asked the senior: “If you could eat anything… what would it be?” He replied, “A caramel sundae.” LOOK: Hundreds of People Bring Backpacks Instead of Flowers to Woman’s Funeral The medics then detoured from their route, so they could buy McCartney the sweet treat before arriving at the hospital.
After Sharon expressed her appreciation for the gesture, the pair posted a photo of McCartney with his sundae.
Kate and Hanna said they were “humbled” by the note of gratitude which “underlines an often-unseen aspect of patient care; the caring.” “Sharon’s message emphasized the enjoyment Ron received from such a simple action and thanked paramedics for the swift and high level of care and compassion shown to him on both this occasion, and their previous interactions over the last few months as well,” wrote the ambulance service.
Shortly after the ambulance ride, McCartney’s daughter Danielle Smith commented on the photo to express her own appreciation for the compassion shown to her father before he passed away.
RELATED: When Widow Carries On Husband’s Kind Tradition of Filling a Cooler, People Pay It Forward “Dad enjoyed this so much and [it] was the last thing he was able to eat by himself,” wrote Smith.
Be Sure And Share This Sweet Story Of Compassion With Your Friends – Photo by Queensland Ambulance Service

What’s the Maximum Gravity We Could Survive?

What’s the Maximum Gravity We Could Survive?

Ever since we managed to put men on the moon, we’ve been looking for other places for people to go.
Then bigger and better telescopes led us to exoplanets, those outside our solar system.
Somewhere along the way, we switched from thinking of pure exploration to colonizing other planets.
But our bodies were built for Earth.
Even if we find an exoplanet with an oxygen-rich atmosphere, liquid water, and tolerable temperatures, would we be able to live with a different level of gravity?
If its gravity is too strong our blood will be pulled down into our legs, our bones might break, and we could even be pinned helplessly to the ground.
Finding the gravitational limit of the human body is something that’s better done before we land on a massive new planet.
Now, in a paper published on the pre-print server arXiv, three physicists, claim that the maximum gravitational field humans could survive long-term is four-and-a-half times the gravity on Earth.
Read how they figured that out at Discover magazine.
-via Digg (Image credit: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech)

Philadelphia Threw a WWI Parade That Gave Thousands of Onlookers the Flu

Philadelphia Threw a WWI Parade That Gave Thousands of Onlookers the Flu

A hundred years ago, in the autumn of 1918, the Great War was dragging on, so Philadelphia threw a parade to raise morale and sell war bonds called “Liberty Loans.”
The parade highlighted any available soldiers and sailors, plus the many homefront organizations supporting them.
The spectacle would end with a concert conducted by John Philip Souza himself.
When the Fourth Liberty Loan Drive parade stepped off on September 28, some 200,000 people jammed Broad Street, cheering wildly as the line of marchers stretched for two miles.
Floats showcased the latest addition to America’s arsenal – floating biplanes built in Philadelphia’s Navy Yard.
Brassy tunes filled the air along a route where spectators were crushed together like sardines in a can.
Each time the music stopped, bond salesmen singled out war widows in the crowd, a move designed to evoke sympathy and ensure that Philadelphia met its Liberty Loan quota.
But aggressive Liberty Loan hawkers were far from the greatest threat that day.
Lurking among the multitudes was an invisible peril known as influenza—and it loves crowds.
Read how Philadelphia (and other American cities) reacted to the Spanish flu at Smithsonian.

The Weird and Mystical World of Sleepwalking

The Weird and Mystical World of Sleepwalking

According to the neighbors, one woman would get on her motorcycle and go riding late at night, although she had no idea because she was sleepwalking.
Others cook meals, preach sermons, and commit murder while sleeping.
It’s estimated that 30 percent of us sleepwalk at one time or another, but we really don’t know because we sleep through it.
Although it’s thought to be triggered by stress, anxiety, and alcohol, it is totally unknown why we do it.
Are we simply on auto-pilot?
Trying to fulfill our fantasies?
Or perhaps something stranger… Science hasn’t always provided satisfactory answers to the many questions raised around sleepwalking.
Throughout history, the mysteries of somnambulance have lead many to come up with their own theories—drawing on spirituality, pseudo-science, and folklore—with sleepwalkers seeming to exist somewhere between this world and another.
Read a short history of sleepwalking that covers famous cases, scientific research, and pop culture, at Vice.

How to Read at Night

How to Read at Night

Reading before bed is calming, and helps prepare your mind and body for a night of restful sleep.
To get the most out of reading for bed, find a quiet space to read in.
Changing positions every 30–45 minutes can also help you to avoid bad posture and can prevent you from feeling discomfort in your neck or back.
3 Read light fiction at night to prepare yourself for sleep.
4 Clip on a book light if you don’t want bright lights on in your room.
Clip the clamp onto the back cover of your book, angle the bulb towards the page you’re currently reading, and switch on the light.
[3] Either type of book light will keep the light source directly over the book, and won’t wake up anyone else sleeping in the same room.
Your partner may find the rustling under the covers even more distracting than sleeping with the lights on.
6 Avoid reading in the dark so you don’t strain your eyes.
To avoid straining your eyes reading at night, sit or lie near a source of good lighting.

Bill Cosby to be sentenced for sexual assault in Andrea Constand case

Bill Cosby to be sentenced for sexual assault in Andrea Constand case

Cosby, 81, was convicted in April of three counts of aggravated indecent assault against Andrea Constand, 45, who said he drugged and assaulted her at his Pennsylvania home in 2004 after she came to him for career advice.
Although Cosby is not a flight risk, he doesn’t seem to have any clear winners for his appeal.”
It’s not clear if that could weigh for or against him.
Attorney Gloria Allred, who represents three of five accusers allowed to testify in the trial, argues anything less than time behind bars for Cosby will amount to “celebrity justice.”
More than 60 other women have made allegations ranging from groping to to rape, and many claimed Cosby had drugged them.
O’Neill ruled that additional accusers cannot weigh in during sentencing.
It’s not clear if the five women who did testify against Cosby during the trial will be eligible to speak.
With a 2018 verdict coming the year after the #MeToo social media movement took flight, Cosby could be seen as a pernicious pioneer for the consequences of sexual assault in contemporary Hollywood. “We gave encouragement, liberation and voice to the #Me Too movement,” said Victoria Valentino, 75, who has accused Cosby of drugging and raping her in Los Angeles in 1969.
MacKinnon said the sentence could be seen as a bellwether.

When Hospitals Can’t Afford Equipment, Doctor Uses Discarded Shampoo Bottles to Cut Mortality by 75 Percent!

When Hospitals Can’t Afford Equipment, Doctor Uses Discarded Shampoo Bottles to Cut Mortality by 75 Percent!

Back in 1996, Dr. Mohammod Chisti was working his first shift as a medical intern when he witnessed three children die as a result of pneumonia.
Though the event broke his heart, it motivated him to come up with a solution for the high rates of pneumonia-related child mortalities – and the result is nothing short of extraordinary.
Ordinarily, the condition can be treated with a ventilator that helps the patient to breathe – but since the average ventilator costs about $15,000, many hospitals in developing countries can’t afford the proper equipment.
RELATED: When Doctors Predicted These Coma Patients Would Not Wake Up, AI Disagreed.
Then All 7 Patients Woke Up.
While Chisti was studying in Australia, however, he was introduced to a different kind of ventilator that employed bubble-CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure).
Then one day, Chisti noticed a discarded shampoo bottle that happened to be filled with bubbles.
MORE: ‘Groundbreaking’ Type 1 Diabetes Drug Has Just Been Trialed on First Human Patients–With No Side Effects He tested his makeshift shampoo bottle ventilator on several patients and was stunned to find that they recovered almost overnight.
His ingenious ventilator cut pneumonia-related infant deaths by 75%.
WATCH: Hundreds of People Are Being Cured of Blindness Every Day With Cheap, Minutes-Long Surgery This is roughly the same mortality rate achieved at more affluent hospitals using conventional ventilators – except his shampoo bottle rig only costs about $1.25, meaning that his hospital has spent 90% less money on pneumonia treatment.

‘You Gotta Take Care Of Home’: Michael Jordan Donates $2 Million To Hurricane Florence Recovery

‘You Gotta Take Care Of Home’: Michael Jordan Donates $2 Million To Hurricane Florence Recovery

Michael Jordan has made the largest individual monetary contribution to Hurricane Florence recovery efforts with a $2 million donation. “You gotta take care of home,” Jordan told The Associated Press.
Wilmington, Fayetteville, Myrtle Beach, New Bern, and Wallace, which is where my father is from. “It makes you think about the path that you have taken, and where your life has taken you.
And I just feel like, well, maybe if I can help in some sort of way all of the people, and all of the places, that have helped me along the road.” “This is going to have a huge disruption on people’s lives — not for 10 days, but for years,” he told the Charlotte Observer. “It’s truly devastating for me to see the damage that Hurricane Florence is doing to my beloved home state of North Carolina and to the surrounding areas,” Jordan, owner and chairman of the Charlotte Hornets, said on behalf of the organization.
Together with the NBA, we have launched a platform to aid those most impacted.
Please join me, the Hornets organization and the NBA and donate to one of the local organizations assisting in the relief and recovery efforts.
To all those affected, stay safe and know that we’re here to help.”

Architects Build Stunning Hotel Into the Walls of an Abandoned Rock Quarry

Architects Build Stunning Hotel Into the Walls of an Abandoned Rock Quarry

Adventurers and travel junkies have another quirky destination to visit during their next world tour.
The Deep Pit Hotel, which is being called the world’s first “underground” hotel, opens next month as a swanky new Intercontinental resort that has been built inside an abandoned quarry southwest of Shanghai, China.
The hotel has 18 floors, two of which are submerged in an aquarium.
Every room on the other 16 floors is equipped with its own balcony that looks out over the strange landscape.
The facility was also built with sustainability in mind.
The hotel’s structure was mainly kept within the walls of the quarry to minimize environmental impact.
Additionally, the hotel will be drawing on geothermal and solar energy for power.
As a means of serving adrenaline junkie visitors, the hotel will also offer bungee jumping and rock climbing from the top of the quarry.
LOOK: Hotel’s Devotion to Service Includes Delivering Nic Cage on Guest’s Pillow Over the course of the last decade, the “Intercontinental Shimao Wonderland” has required over 5,000 workers from the British design firm Atkins to finish the building.
Now, the hotel is expected to open to the public this October.

Yasiel Puig’s Fourth Home Burglary Triggers Big Police Presence in Neighborhood

Yasiel Puig’s Fourth Home Burglary Triggers Big Police Presence in Neighborhood

After 4th Home Burglary If Dodgers slugger Yasiel Puig’s house is hit by burglars again … it won’t be because of a lack of effort by cops.
Law enforcement sources tell TMZ … cops have significantly increased their presence in the San Fernando Valley area where Puig’s home — and so many others — have been hit by thieves.
Puig’s 4th burglary — the last one was this week — was the catalyst for law enforcement to kick things up to nab some of these bad guys.
We broke the story … LAPD got video footage of the suspects breaking into Puig’s home after one of them kicked the front door open.
Cops believe there are 3 suspects involved in the latest burglary … and say they’re the same perps who tried to steal his stuff on August 30.
Incredibly, Yasiel had yet another intruder on his property Thursday night … but the guy isn’t believed to be one of the burglars.
Puig has a Ring security system set up at his home to get alerts for any visitors, but so far it hasn’t been enough to keep thieves away.
Cops are clearly hoping a boost in neighborhood patrols will do the trick.

Kevin Hart rips Katt Williams for attacking Tiffany Haddish

Kevin Hart rips Katt Williams for attacking Tiffany Haddish

Kevin Hart inserted himself into Katt Williams and Tiffany Haddish’s recent beef.
Hart — who appeared on “The Breakfast Club” on Friday alongside Haddish — slammed Williams for attacking his “Night School” co-star in a radio interview and labeling her a less-than comedian.
“My frustrations with Katt Williams come from, you keep pointing at Hollywood.
When do you take responsibility for your actions?” Williams, who has 19 felonies to his name, has had a rocky few years in the spotlight.
“You had the shot!” Hart said passionately while defending Haddish.
“You were the guy!
You f—ked off your promo trips … You became a risk to the studios, which is why the studios stopped f—king with you.” Hart claimed Williams, 47, chose bad behavior over success and it’s the reason why he’s bringing down other comedians.
“So when you say Tiffany Haddish doesn’t deserve or isn’t really a comedian and these other women have worked hard, which they have,” Hart said.
So because you haven’t, don’t s–t on those that are!” Hart drove home his point, as Haddish sat quietly, saying top comics like Jerry Seinfeld, Chris Rock and George Lopez have not complained about rising stars.
“Don’t blame everybody else for your s–t.” Although Williams did slam Haddish, the two appeared to have made amends.

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