Mind/Brain Candy

The Universe May Be Conscious, Prominent Scientists State

The Universe May Be Conscious, Prominent Scientists State.
Take the brain out of the equation and consciousness doesn’t exist at all.
Without it, the universe doesn’t exist at all or at least, not without some sort of consciousness observing it.
In some physics circles, the prevailing theory is some kind of proto-consciousness field.
In his view, every piece of matter contains a bit of consciousness, which it absorbs from this proto-consciousness field.
He called his theory the “participatory anthropic principle,” which posits that a human observer is key to the process.
Dr. Koch is attempting to see if he can measure the level of consciousness an organism contains.
Matloff took a different view.
Matloff suggests that this could be an instance of the star consciously manipulating itself, in order to gain speed.
Neuroscientist and psychiatrist Giulio Tononi, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, proposes a slightly different take on panpsychism, called integrated information theory.

Scientists Film an Essential Process of Life for the First Time Ever, See Surprises

Scientists Film an Essential Process of Life for the First Time Ever, See Surprises.
Researchers pulled off a first-ever scientific feat, recording video of a single DNA molecule replicating itself.
All living organisms feature this biological process, and understanding how it works in greater detail could lead to a host of new discoveries in biology and medicine.
When cells divide, DNA replication is necessary for each new cell to have a full copy of our genome, the human genetic code that contains about 3 billion base pairs.
The scientists from University of California, Davis used advanced imaging technology to observe DNA extracted from E. coli bacteria.
Here’s what the scientists filmed, showing the replication of individual pieces of double-stranded DNA: During replication, the DNA double helix “unzips” into two strands that run in opposite directions called “the leading strand” and “lagging strand”.
The scientists discovered that there wasn’t as much coordination between the strands as was anticipated.
At other points, the copying would stop on one strand while continuing on the other.
Kowalczykowski compared this to what happens with traffic on the highway: “Sometimes the traffic in the next lane is moving faster and passing you, and then you pass it.
But if you travel far enough you get to the same place at the same time.” The fresh understanding of DNA replication can lead to a completely new way of thinking, with Kowalczykowski calling it “a real paradigm shift” which “undermines a great deal of what’s in the textbooks.”

Sgt. Pepper Wasn’t Broken. So They Fixed It.

You could record, say, drums on one track, bass on another, guitar on a third track, and piano on another: When you play them back together, you’d sound like a band.
If the recording is the artist’s performance, the mix is the producer’s, and the recording engineer’s.
By the time The Beatles became popular, four-track machines were in use in England where they recorded.
Who were they if not Beatles?
The mono “Dear Prudence” from The Beatles, for example, could make you cry; the stereo version is…nice.
With the mono mixes serving as his model for the new version, he has essentially created, for the first time, a stereo version of the mono mix.
Back to Bassics Finally, part of the difference between the rockiness of the old stereo and mono had to do with the issues in vinyl mastering — stereo vinyl mastering was even less tolerant of too much bass with twice as much info to fit into each groove — and the new Sgt.
Pepper is one such record.
Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band 2 Deluxe CD (Anniversary Edition) This two-CD set includes the remixed album and single, as well as a handful of session highlights.
Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band CD (Anniversary Edition) This CD contains the new remix of the album.

Neil deGrasse Tyson is Developing a Space Exploration Video Game

Neil deGrasse Tyson is Developing a Space Exploration Video Game.
What if a video game could teach science in a way that didn’t put gamers to sleep?
That’s the idea behind a new game called Space Odyssey, which aims to be a virtual universe governed by real scientific laws where players can build planets and solar systems and explore the cosmos.
Neil deGrasse Tyson is helping to develop the game and is planned to be the narrator who guides players through space.
Space Odyssey, as Business Insider reports, would feature “building activity similar to Minecraft, space colonization akin to that in Civilization: Beyond Earth, elements of exploration like No Man’s Sky, and echoes of Elon Musk’s favorite rocket-building simulator, Kerbal Space Program.” What would set this game apart, however, is its educational bent and insistence on using real-life science to inform the mechanisms of the game.
The game is in early stages of development and at the time of writing has received just more than a third of its $314,159 Kickstarter goal.
“He’s helped create challenges in the game, and has challenged our creative team to entertain and inspire,” Murphy said.
Our goal with the VR missions is to take things to an even more educational level,” Murphy said.
It remains to be seen if Space Odyssey can fuse science education into its ships and terraformed planets, and end up with gameplay that’s compelling to mainstream gamers.
Neil deGrasse Tyson: Bringing Commercial Space Fantasies Back to Earth Neil deGrasse Tyson Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window.

10 Living Philosophers and Why You Should Know Them

10 Living Philosophers and Why You Should Know Them.
It can be easy to think that all the good ideas have already been thought; after all, philosophy have been going on for more than 2500 years.
Noam Chomsky’s Trick for Avoiding Political Letdown: Low Expectations Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window.
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Cornel West: Hope Is an Action We Can All Take Retry later “The Enlightenment worldview held by Bu Bois is ultimately inadequate, and, in many ways, antiquated, for our time.” Martha Nussbaum An American philosopher at the University of Chicago, Martha has written about subjects as diverse as ancient Greek philosophy, ethics, feminism, political philosophy, and animal rights.
He has written on free will for decades, and supports the compatibilist view.
Caption Settings Dialog Beginning of dialog window.
His BigThink videos help explain his philosophy.
Retry later Retry later “We are responsible not only for what we do but also for what we could have prevented.” Amartya Sen An Indian Philosopher and Nobel Prize Laureate who was worked for decades in welfare economics, capability theory, and on the questions of justice.
His work went on to inspire Martha Nussbaum, and they continue to compliment each other’s work.

Timothy Spall – That Double Want – Think Again Podcast #104

Timothy Spall – That Double Want – Think Again Podcast #104.
Come talk to us on Twitter: @bigthinkagain Since 2008, Big Think has been sharing big ideas from creative and curious minds.
Since 2015, the Think Again podcast has been taking us out of our comfort zone, surprising our guests and Jason Gots, your host, with unexpected conversation starters from Big Think’s interview archives.
Timothy Spall is an extraordinary actor, best known perhaps for the many films he’s done with director Mike Leigh, including Secrets & Lies and Mr. Turner, for which he won best actor at Cannes.
You may know him from a number of Hollywood films, too, including the Harry Potter series and The Last Samurai, with Tom Cruise.
His latest is THE JOURNEY.
It’s based on a real road trip that happened in 2006, when two arch enemies — the heads of Ireland’s warring factions, spent about an hour together in the backseat of a car.
This was the prelude to a historic peace deal, cementing the end of Ireland’s long Civil war.
In this episode we dig deep into questions like what people really want from their political leaders, whether it’s possible (or even advisable) to overcome desire, and whether and when just sitting on a park bench, enjoying a tree, is enough.
Surprise conversation starter interview clips in this episode:

How to Turn L.A. into a Giant Orchard

Is it possible to make LOS ANGELES a city of: Safe and friendly neighborhoods; Full employment; Easy Transit; Solar Power; Orchards; Pure Water; Clean Air; and Natural Beauty?
That is the question posed on page two of Paul Glover’s Los Angeles: A History of the Future.
Food, fuel and most water were produced locally.
Food, fuel, metals and water are piped, pumped and trucked from great distances.
FUTURE STAGE ONE: Community land trusts and limited equity co-ops form to give renters control of land and housing.
FUTURE STAGE TWO: Most garages are removed to extend gardens and food trees.
FUTURE STAGE FOUR: First ecolony is completed, two others are being built.
FUTURE STAGE SEVEN: The neighborhood has become an orchard looped with bikeways and solar rail.
Is this what the future of L.A. will look like?
But online networking has made physical commuting less necessary, and underpins the rise of sharing as the basis for new business models.

Is the US Paying $300 Million Too Much to Launch Rockets? Elon Musk Thinks So.

Is the US Paying $300 Million Too Much to Launch Rockets?
That appears to be the deal that SpaceX’s founder Elon Musk is offering the US government, with the newfound competition in the national security payload launch market.
$300M cost diff between SpaceX and Boeing/Lockheed exceeds avg value of satellite, so flying with SpaceX means satellite is basically free https://t.co/CaOulCf7ot — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) June 16, 2017 As first reported by Ars Technica, greater transparency as to how much the government pays for its launches has brought this brought the issue of cost competition into focus.
As estimated by the Department of Defense’s 2018 budget, the cost for using ULA comes out to $422 million for a single launch.
The Government may award early integration contracts to ensure each potential offeror’s launch system is compatible with the intended payload.
Beginning in Fiscal Year 2018, the Air Force will compete all launch service procurements for each mission where more than one certified provider can service the required reference orbit. “-Department of Defense Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 Budget Estimates, Page 109 (notes) As you may imagine with governmental documents, it is not always easy to get a side-by-side cost comparison.
The company’s Falcon 9 rockets have a commercial cost of $65 million; the specifications for a satellite launch can add tens of million to the cost but have always clocked in at under $100 million.
If this is truly an apples-to-apples comparison with the estimated $422 launch cost by ULA, it would appear to be a dramatic opportunity by the government to save money.
(The much higher costs now associated with a ULA launch may be related to changes in budget transparency, which now include the capability costs the government pays to ULA.)

Fisherman Say Orcas Are Harrassing Them. Orcas Have No Comment.

Fisherman Say Orcas Are Harrassing Them.
Orcas Have No Comment.. From the point of view of the Alaska Dispatch News, it’s clear who the victims are in this story: fishermen.
Animal lovers, not to mention vegetarians, might well see these labels flipped.
It depends on who, according to you, gets to eat the fish in the ocean.
The News spoke to several fishermen about what’s going on.
Orcas have been following the boats of longline fishermen in the Bering Sea off Alaska and making off with the halibut and black cod, or sablefish, caught by demersal longlines deployed on the ocean floor.
In a letter he wrote to the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council in May 2017, he spoke of an April trip during which his boat was being “harassed non-stop” by killer whales.
Gulf of Alaskan waters are home to an estimated 1,475 killer whales, primarily Northern Resident Orcas.
Still, Jay Hebert, captain of the Aleutian Sable, tells the News that it’s now the worst he’s seen in 39 years of fishing the Bering.
Hebert wonders if fishermen should consider moving away from longlines and to pots — wire or wood enclosures that entrap fish — if they want to keep their catch, and fisherman Buck Laukitis recently presented a proposal to this effect to the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council, saying, “You know how to catch fish, you know the fish are there, and you have the gear, you’ve done it many times, but the whales can just completely shut you down.

Fisherman Say Orcas Are Harrassing Them. Orcas Have No Comment.

Fisherman Say Orcas Are Harrassing Them.
Orcas Have No Comment.. From the point of view of the Alaska Dispatch News, it’s clear who the victims are in this story: fishermen.
Animal lovers, not to mention vegetarians, might well see these labels flipped.
It depends on who, according to you, gets to eat the fish in the ocean.
The News spoke to several fishermen about what’s going on.
Orcas have been following the boats of longline fishermen in the Bering Sea off Alaska and making off with the halibut and black cod, or sablefish, caught by demersal longlines deployed on the ocean floor.
In a letter he wrote to the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council in May 2017, he spoke of an April trip during which his boat was being “harassed non-stop” by killer whales.
Gulf of Alaskan waters are home to an estimated 1,475 killer whales, primarily Northern Resident Orcas.
Still, Jay Hebert, captain of the Aleutian Sable, tells the News that it’s now the worst he’s seen in 39 years of fishing the Bering.
Hebert wonders if fishermen should consider moving away from longlines and to pots — wire or wood enclosures that entrap fish — if they want to keep their catch, and fisherman Buck Laukitis recently presented a proposal to this effect to the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council, saying, “You know how to catch fish, you know the fish are there, and you have the gear, you’ve done it many times, but the whales can just completely shut you down.

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