Accessibility

First Ultra-Accessible Waterpark for the Disabled Just Opened its Doors

America’s first ultra-accessible waterpark has just opened its doors to the public on Saturday.

The $17 million San Antonio waterpark, Morgan’s Inspiration Island, has dozens of features that make it the most handicap-accessible park in the country.

The park, which is a nonprofit organization, offers special passes to kids who have trouble waiting in lines; the water temperature can be adjusted for guests who have sensory issues; the water is constantly filtered and reused for kids with immune issues (and for the environment); all of the rides are wheelchair accessible; and every visitor with disabilities is given free admission.

RELATED: Child With Invisible Disability Creates Bathroom Sign With Go-Ahead from Government

Children who have a tendency to wander are given waterproof wristbands with GPS so parents and staff can easily locate the youngsters in the park, if necessary.

In order to prevent overcrowding, admission to the park is also limited. Parents are encouraged to purchase tickets online in order to guarantee attendance.

The…

First Ultra-Accessible Waterpark for the Disabled Just Opened its Doors

America’s first ultra-accessible waterpark has just opened its doors to the public on Saturday.

The $17 million San Antonio waterpark, Morgan’s Inspiration Island, has dozens of features that make it the most handicap-accessible park in the country.

The park, which is a nonprofit organization, offers special passes to kids who have trouble waiting in lines; the water temperature can be adjusted for guests who have sensory issues; the water is constantly filtered and reused for kids with immune issues (and for the environment); all of the rides are wheelchair accessible; and every visitor with disabilities is given free admission.

RELATED: Child With Invisible Disability Creates Bathroom Sign With Go-Ahead from Government

Children who have a tendency to wander are given waterproof wristbands with GPS so parents and staff can easily locate the youngsters in the park, if necessary.

In order to prevent overcrowding, admission to the park is also limited. Parents are encouraged to purchase tickets online in order to guarantee attendance.

The…

Global access to quality health care has improved in the last two decades

map of countries
HEALTH CARE PALETTE Countries shaded with cooler hues had better health care quality and accessibility in 2015 than those with hotter colors. Researchers created the Healthcare Access and Quality Index to assess each country’s status.

Health care quality and availability improved globally from 1990 to 2015, but the gap between the haves and the have-nots widened in those 25 years, researchers report online May 18 in The Lancet.

As an approximate measure of citizens’ access to quality health care, an international team of researchers analyzed mortality rates for 32 diseases and injuries that are typically not fatal when effective medical care is available. The team…

Why Mac Apps Occasionally Ask for Access to Accessibility Features

If you use a Mac and any software that controls your keyboard, including text expanders, you’ve probably come across a dialogue box asking you to grant the app access to “accessibility features.” How-To Geek explains what that means.

Accessibility settings are gated off by Apple for security purposes because apps that help with accessibility, like text-to-speech applications or key logging applications, work by controlling certain system level services or other applications entirely. Traditionally, a Mac app is a single container that cannot access system level controls. Accessibility apps get a little more control over system access and can control other apps entirely. How-To Geek explains it like so:

In part, it uses this name because multiple accessibility applications need access to these…

Why Do Some Mac Apps Need to “Control This Computer Using Accessibility Features?”

Some apps, like Dropbox and Steam, will ask to “control this computer using accessibility features.” But what the heck does that even mean?

The wording is confusing, to say that least. What does this permission actually grant? Basically, this gives the app in question the ability to control other programs. Apple outlines their advice here:

If you’re familiar with an app, you can authorize it by clicking Open System Preferences in the alert, then selecting the checkbox for the app in the Privacy pane. If you’re unfamiliar with an app or you don’t want to give it access to your Mac at that time, click Deny in the alert.

But that just leaves more questions. Why do you have to give this permission at all? What does giving this permission mean—will such applications really “control this computer”? And why is this called “Accessibility” access, instead of just system access? Let’s break this down.

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Why Do I Have to Do This?

The process of enabling Accessibility Settings is a bit convoluted. You need to open System Preferences, then head to Security & Privacy > Privacy > Accessibility. From there you need to click the lock icon in the bottom-left corner, enter you password, and only then can you grant your application access.

So why do you have to do this? The answer, in short, is to protect your security.

By default, Mac apps are self-contained, and can’t change the way you interact with the system or other applications. This is a very good thing. It prevents sketchy things from happening, like games you’ve downloaded logging your keystrokes or malware clicking buttons in your browser.

But some applications need to control other applications to…