Antibiotics

Do You Know Tea Tree Oil is Very Useful For Acne and Hair?

You’ve probably heard of the powerful anti-bacterial properties of tea tree oil especially when it comes to our skin. Also known as melaleuca oil, tea tree oil is made from the leaves of the plant Melaleuca alternifolia commonly found in Australia.

Many medical studies have found tea tree oil to kill bacteria, fungi and strains of viruses making it a favourite remedy for decades. These days, tea tree oil has become even more popular with it being an ingredient in face and hair products, massage oils and even detergents.

So, how can we really benefit from this amazing, natural remedy?

The Benefits Of Tea Tree Oil

Don’t just take people’s word for the amazing power of tea tree oil. Many scientific studies 1 have been conducted in order to prove just how beneficial this oil is.

Its exceptional healing properties mean it can have several different uses.

Tea Tree Oil For Acne

This oil can help heal many forms of skin conditions including acne, rashes, eczema, and fungal infections but acne is the most common association with tea tree oil. This is because it contains strong antibacterial and antifungal compounds which penetrates the skin and unblocks sebaceous glands. This has led to studies that have found tea tree oil to be as effective as benzoyl peroxide 2 but without the harshness.

On top of that, it can help against scarring which is a common side effect from continuous acne on the face and body.

Tea tree oil is known for soothing dry scalp and for getting rid of unsightly dandruff 3. It also helps unclog hair follicles and nourishes the roots of the hair which helps your hair to grow more strong and healthy.

For those with kids who are prone to getting head lice, tea tree oil has even been found to kill lice as well as reducing the number of eggs that hatch making it a more natural way to tackle this common problem 4.

Tea Tree Oil For Cuts And Infections

Because tea tree oil is anti-bacterial, it makes an amazing natural way to clean any cuts and tackle any infections found in wounds.

It can also deal with fungal infection such as toenail fungus, ringworm and athlete’s foot as it’s so effective…

Antibiotics Raise Mortality Risk for Honeybees, Study Finds

Efforts to protect honeybees may be doing more harm than good. Scientists say the antibiotics routinely administered by beekeepers wipe out beneficial bacteria in the bees’ guts, making them vulnerable to other pathogens. They published their findings in the journal PLOS Biology.

These are hard days for honeybees, and apiarists are doing all they can to keep their charge healthy and safe. Twice a year in North America, Asia, and parts of Europe, many beekeepers dose their hives with preventative antibiotics. The drugs may be dusted on the hive or added to the bees’ food to ensure that each insect gets its medicine.

But, as we’re learning in humans, blanket treatment with antibiotics is not really a great option. The more antibiotics we use, the faster pathogens develop antibiotic resistance, and the drugs kill helpful bacteria along with the harmful stuff they’re meant to treat.

Scientists wondered if the same was true for bees. To find out, they brought about 800 bees from long-established hives into the laboratory and split the bees into two groups: the treatment group, marked with a dot of pink paint, and the control group, marked with a…