Archaeology

National Museum of Underwater Archeology

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Temporary exhibition building Dr Alan P Newman (Atlas Obscura User)
Cross section reproduction of Roman vessel. Dr Alan P Newman (Atlas Obscura User)
Coins from the Nuestra Senora de las Mercedes Benjamín Núñez González
Cross section reproduction of Phoenician vessel. Dr Alan P Newman (Atlas Obscura User)
Display showing marine concretions on an iron anchor Dr Alan P Newman (Atlas Obscura User)
Dr Alan P Newman (Atlas Obscura User)
Dr Alan P Newman (Atlas Obscura User)
Anchor cross bars from Roman vessels Dr Alan P Newman (Atlas Obscura User)
Coins from an 18th century shipwreck and a showing effects of corrosion and the restoration process Dr Alan P Newman (Atlas Obscura User)
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Found: World War I Training Tunnels Full of Live Grenades

The entrance to a tunnel.
The entrance to a tunnel. Wessex Archaeology

In Wiltshire, England, a stretch of land is being redeveloped into future housing for Army families, and as part of the work to prepare the site, archaeologists have uncovered tunnels and trenches that were built in the 1910s to prepare soldiers for battlefield conditions in World War I.

The training was intense, as The Guardian reports: even though there was a base nearby, the men would spend weeks in these tunnels during “the brutal winter of 1916-17.”

The excavation has turned up many artifacts of daily life from a century ago—“mess tins, combs, toothbrushes,…

Found: World War I Training Tunnels Full of Live Grenades

The entrance to a tunnel.
The entrance to a tunnel. Wessex Archaeology

In Wiltshire, England, a stretch of land is being redeveloped into future housing for Army families, and as part of the work to prepare the site, archaeologists have uncovered tunnels and trenches that were built in the 1910s to prepare soldiers for battlefield conditions in World War I.

The training was intense, as The Guardian reports: even though there was a base nearby, the men would spend weeks in these tunnels during “the brutal winter of 1916-17.”

The excavation has turned up many artifacts of daily life from a century ago—“mess tins, combs, toothbrushes,…

How Archaeologists and Locals Are Protecting Ancient Ruins in Peru

Around 30 miles outside Lima, Peru sits Pachacámac, an important pre-Columbian archaeological complex filled with palaces, temples, plazas, and pyramids. It’s named after Pacha Kamaq, the ancient Peruvian “Earth Maker” creator, and was first settled around 200 CE. During the pre-Inca and Inca periods, Pachacámac was an important political, cultural, and religious center. But today, thanks to overcrowding and a lack of public services, impoverished shantytowns in the outskirts of Lima threaten to swallow the historic site.

“Like many archaeological sites in Peru, urban growth has encroached on the area,” writes Carolyn Barnwell for National Geographic’s Explorers…