Art

Instagram Tricks For Artists To Achieve A Successful Career

instagram for artists
instagram for artists

For any artist to succeed in this highly competitive world, he needs to pay as much attention to promoting his art as its generation. Today, art is accessible to everyone. Because it is so common and accessible, you need to maintain and promote the quality of your work both online and offline if you want to gain an edge.

Instagram is quite a great platform for artists as it fundamentally concentrates on sharing images, paintings, and art masterpieces. It enables artists to demonstrate their painting process and even to sell their unique paintings along the way.

As per Vogue, artists sell their paintings on a regular basis today thanks to their Instagram feed. The platform allows incredible and somewhat unprecedented accessibility to all its users across the world.

If you want to take the same path, here are some secret tips for artists to gain Instagram success.

Make It A Fascinating And Interesting Experience

You must always make it a point to share those photos that are relevant and appropriate to your image as a capable artist. Instagram is an effective way to showcase your creativity, the things that inspire or motivate you, and even the events that are happening in your life.

You must understand that Instagram is definitely not just about your art. It can also be about your daily way of life and your…

Ancient Robot Creates Modern Art

They say that there’s more to a Jackson Pollock painting than randomly scattering paint on a canvas, and the auction value of his work seems to verify that claim. If you want to create some more conventional artwork, however, but are missing the artistic muse that inspired Pollock, maybe you can put your creative energies to work building a robot that will create the art for you.

[Dane Kouttron] was able to get his hands on an old SCARA robotic arm, and was recently inspired to create a paintbrush-weilding robot…

Want to Become an Artist? 13 Chrome Apps to Get You Started

Do you have an interest in art or becoming an artist? Or maybe you have a friend or child who does? With Chrome apps and extensions, you can explore that amazing world. For creative inspiration, learning about the greats, and tools to get you started, look no further than these options for budding artists of all ages.

Get Inspiration From Talented Artists

For a quick and simple way to be inspired by other artists, check out the Artistaday.com Daily Contemporary Art extension. When you click the button in your toolbar, you will see the current day’s featured artist’s image from Artistaday.com.

In addition, when you open a new tab, you will see a picture in each one from a different artist.

chrome artistaday.com

A similar extension called GalleryTab by Vango provides a piece of artwork in your new tabs. And, what’s nice about this tool is that the images rotate automatically, but you can also use the arrows to move through them on your own.

The artwork is courtesy of VangoArt.com and you can follow artists you like with a free account. Or simply share those you enjoy with a click.

chrome gallerytab

If art photography is more your style, then ArtSocket is a Chrome app you might enjoy. You can view photos from various artists offline and read the interesting stories behind each piece.

Browse or buy in the Art Gallery & Store, check out biographies and works in the Artists & Writers section, or get tips from articles in the Gallery Magazine area.

chrome artsocket photography

Learn About Notable Works

Simply titled Art, this extension shows you a classic piece of artwork in each new tab you open. From Degas to Rembrandt and more, you can see these fine works of art and brief details about them.

The start and completion dates, style and genre, technique, and gallery where the work is displayed are all included.

chrome art bearwin

Another app with same name, Art, provides you views of many different art forms, also in your new tab window. These pieces are from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and vary from embroidery to pottery to sculptures to paintings.

You will see a photo of the piece on a plain white background. Then, simply click the question mark at the top for more information. This includes a link to the piece on the museum website where you can read full details.

chrome art zackschnell

Try Out Some Cool Tools

For photo…

Robert M. Pirsig, Author of ‘Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance,’ Dies at 88

Robert M. Pirsig, whose “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance,” a dense and discursive novel of ideas, became an unlikely publishing phenomenon in the mid-1970s and a touchstone in the waning days of the counterculture, died on Monday at his home in South Berwick, Me. He was 88.

His publisher, William Morrow, announced his death, saying his health had been failing. He had been living in Maine for the last 30 years.

Mr. Pirsig was a college writing instructor and freelance technical writer when the novel — its full title was “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values” — was published in 1974 to critical acclaim and explosive popularity, selling a million copies in its first year and several million more since. (A first novel, it would be followed by only one more, the less successful “Lila: An Inquiry Into Morals,” a kind of sequel, in 1991.)

The novel, with its peculiar but intriguing title, ranged widely in its concerns, contemplating the relationship of humans and machines, madness and the roots of culture.

Todd Gitlin, a sociologist and the author of books about the counterculture, said that “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance,” in seeking to reconcile humanism with technological progress, had been perfectly timed for a generation weary of the ’60s revolt against a soulless high-tech world dominated by a corporate and military-industrial order.

“There is such a thing as a zeitgeist, and I believe the book was popular because there were a lot of people who wanted a reconciliation — even if they didn’t know what they were looking for,” Mr. Gitlin said in 2013 in an interview for this obituary. “Pirsig provided a kind of soft landing from the euphoric stratosphere of the late ’60s into the real world of adult life.”

Mr. Pirsig’s plunge into the grand philosophical questions of Western culture remained near the top of the best-seller lists for a decade and helped define the post-hippie 1970s landscape as resoundingly, some critics have said, as Carlos Castaneda’s “The Teachings of Don Juan” helped define the 1960s.

Where “Don Juan” pursued enlightenment in hallucinogenic experience, “Zen” argued for its equal availability in the brain-racking rigors of Reason with a capital R. Years after its publication, it continues to be invoked by famous people when asked to name a book that affected them most deeply — among them the former professional basketball player Phil Jackson, the actors William Shatner and Tim Allen, and the Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk, a Nobel laureate.

Part road-trip novel, part treatise, part open letter to a younger generation, “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” unfolds as a fictionalized account of a cross-country motorcycle trip that Mr. Pirsig took in 1968 with his 11-year-old son, Christopher, and two friends.

The narrative alternates between travelogue-like accounts of their 17 days on the road, from the Pirsigs’ home in Minnesota to the Pacific Coast, and long interior monologues that he calls his “Chautauquas,” after the open-air educational meetings at Lake Chautauqua, N.Y., popular with self-improvers since the 19th century.

Mr. Pirsig’s narrator (his barely disguised stand-in) focuses on what he sees as two profound schisms. The first lay in the 1960s culture war, in which the “hippies” rejected industrialization and the technological values that had been embraced by the “straight” mainstream society.

The second schism is in the narrator’s own mind, as he struggles in his hyperrational way to understand his recent mental breakdown. Mr. Pirsig, who was told he had schizophrenia in the early 1960s, said that writing the book was partly an effort to make peace with himself after two years of hospital treatments, including electric shock therapy, and the turmoil that he, his wife and children suffered as a result.

Describing both breakdowns, cultural and personal, Mr. Pirsig’s narrator invokes the Civil War: “Two worlds growingly alienated and hateful toward each other, with…

Perception: a Giant Anamorphic Art Across 50 Buildings

We’ve posted about many anamorphic art on Neatorama before, but French Tunisian artist eL Seed took it to a new level. For the past year, the artist painted some 50 different buildings in the Zaraeeb community in Cairo, Egypt to create a stunning calligraphic mural (or calligraffiti, a combination of calligraphy and graffiti, as eL Seed puts it).

The gigantic mural, called Perception, is visible from a certain point on the Muqattam Mountain. When viewed from that certain angle, the saying of Saint Athanasius of Alexandria appeared: “Anyone who wants to see the sunlight clearly needs to wipe his eye first”

On his Facebook page, eL Seed wrote:

In the neighborhood of Manshiyat Nasr in Cairo, the…

Why the Internet Is the Greatest Achievement of Any Civilization, Ever

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Growing up, my father often complained about the rising cost of our cable subscription. The bills got higher, the number of stations increased, yet the amount of television we watched rarely changed. The ‘value-added’ networks didn’t add much value. As the number of networks increased the actual worth of television only seemed to decrease.

Much has changed. The amount of content—the word that has replaced ‘art’ and ‘creation’ in recent years—is staggering, leaving an unfathomable amount of unwatchable television in the queue. Yet many have claimed this to be a ‘golden era of television.’ It’s hard to disagree.

While the administrative bureaucracies behind major movie studios take fewer risks, cable TV studios, many now free from the burden of bundling, are pushing boundaries. Shows like HBO’s ‘The Young Pope’ and ‘The Leftovers,’ the BBC’s ‘Peaky Blinders’ and ‘Sherlock,’ and Hulu’s ‘The Path’ take chances only found in independent movies.

Is Your Life Really Yours? How ‘The Attention Merchants’ Got Inside Our Heads Tim Wu

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Is Your Life Really Yours? How ‘The Attention Merchants’ Got Inside Our Heads

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Tim Wu

Author, The Attention Merchants

09:21

As consumer watching habits shift and producers rush in to fill their needs, the question of creative value has been a constant. The NY Times’ Farhad Manjoo, for one, believes the expanding opportunities offered by the digital revolution are saving culture, pushing art forward in interesting, new multi-disciplinary platforms. Manjoo thinks today is “the beginning of a remarkable renaissance in art and culture.”

“In just about every cultural medium, whether movies or music or books or the visual arts, digital technology is letting in new voices, creating new formats for exploration, and allowing fans and other creators to participate in a glorious remixing of the work. This isn’t new; from blogs to podcasts to YouTube, the last 20 years have been marked by a succession of formats that have led to ever-lower barriers for new and off-the-wall creators.”

There is truth to this, though Manjoo comes off as overoptimistic regarding the number of success stories. He points to a handful of Patreon phenoms who are earning their living as independent creators thanks to monthly subscribers. The technology exists and they have taken advantage of it—a certain benefit for those working from the ground up. The problem of rising to the top of the tens of thousands of Patreon users remains, however.

Which is a different scenario than the cable bundling model. In the old days (the eighties, in my case) small networks were able to exist thanks to behemoths like HBO, Showtime, and Cinemax. This model still works for networks like ESPN, which gets six to seven dollars for every subscription, the highest paid network today. Their success allows smaller players to stay in the game.

ESPN provides a…