Camera

How to Stop People From Swiping Through Your Smartphone Photos

If you want to show somebody photos on your phone but don’t want them wantonly scrolling through the rest of your camera roll, there are a few clever tricks you can employ to ensure that they see what you want them to see…and nothing else.

Smartphones have become our take-everywhere, do-everything, all-in-one pocket computers that we manage (and record!) our entire lives on. Unlike handing somebody the little photo book from your wallet that we used to carry around, handing somebody your smartphone gives them access to your personal photos and more. And we’ve all handed someone our phone to show them one photo, only for them to start swiping through to look at everything else.

Rather than simply accept that, you can easily use these tricks to put a lid on rampant camera-roll-scrolling behavior and keeps their eyes just on the photos you want to share.

For Single Photos: Just Zoom In a Little Bit

This tip is a very low effort one, and best suited for showing someone a single photo on your phone while you’re there to supervise them.

On nearly all image gallery apps, including the default gallery apps on iPhone and Android, using the pinch-to-zoom function on a photo “locks” it into place. This locking mechanism isn’t intentionally intended to lock the user onto that photo, but is a side effect of how the activating the zoom function also activates the swipe-to-pan function so you can move around the zoomed in image.

Depending on the operating system and application the photo either stays locked until you zoom out or until you attempt to swipe multiple times—on the iPhone, for example, swiping on the photo bumps into the sides of the screen, and you have to swipe multiple times before it zooms out and resumes normal camera roll functionality.

The only thing kittens love more than yarn is pinch-to-zoom.

To take advantage of this unintended feature, simply pinch-and-zoom every so slightly on the photo (zooming even the tiniest amount will do the trick). Unless the person looking at the photo understands both the concept of pinch-zooming and that the reason their swipe left/right failed, then they’ll likely just scratch their head and hand it back to you. This is a perfect super low effort solution for those times that you’re handing your phone to, say, a relative who doesn’t get the concept of digital privacy (or that you’d even have racy or private photos on your phone in the first place).

Create Albums to Contain Groups of Photos

What about those times you want people to swipe through some photos, but not others?…

How Does the “8x” Zoom on My Point-and-Shoot Compare to My DSLR?

Your camera may boast “8x zoom”, but most DSLRs do not advertise values like these. So how do they compare? The answer is more complex than you may think.

That “8x” value that doesn’t necessarily mean objects in the photo will look 8 times bigger than they do with your eyes. It just means things will be 8 times bigger than its most zoomed-out position—but two cameras in their most zoomed-out positions will not look the same size.

Every lens affects your image in a different way. A wide angle lens warps the perspective in the image so it shows more than you could see with your naked eye. A telephoto lens does the opposite, zooming in like a telescope to distant objects. These things are separate from the actual “zoom” function on your camera, so one 8x zoom lens may not make objects as large as another 8x zoom lens.

So how do we calculate how much bigger an object appears in a photo compared to your eyes, where you’re currently standing? To find that out, you need to know the focal length and field of view of the lens you’re using.

“Canon vs Nikon:”
Did you know about this one camera setting that ruins your pictures? Go to uglyhedgehog.com

Focal Length and Field of View

In photography, the focal length of a lens is the distance between a the camera’s sensor and the internal components of the lens itself. This focal length determines how close objects look to your camera and what part of the scene actually fits within the picture—otherwise known as your field of view. A massive, telescope-like lens with a 1000mm focal length will make objects look very close. Lenses with smaller focal lengths will make objects appear farther away.

Many lenses can “zoom” to different focal lengths. For example, an 18-135mm lens will let you zoom from an 18mm focal length to a 135mm focal length.

Here’s an example. I shot the following two images with my Canon 650D and an 18-135mm lens.

The first photo was taken at the shortest focal length: 18mm. It’s a pretty wide field of view.

The next photo was taken in the exact same place half a second later. The only difference is that I’ve zoomed in to use the lens’ longest focal length, 135mm.

As you can see, the field of view is a lot narrower in the second photo than the first, because we’ve zoomed in on the mountains.

Here’s the catch, though. Different lenses, at their shortest focal length, will show things differently. Remember that 1000mm telescope lens? Even if you don’t zoom in with it, you’re still seeing things much closer than a camera with an 18-135mm lens. So focal length alone isn’t…

What Lenses Should I Buy for My Canon Camera?

The biggest advantage DSLRs have over smartphones and compact cameras is swappable lenses that suit what you’re trying to shoot. Whether you want a lens that can blur the background for great portraits or something that lets you zoom in close to the action, there will be one available.

Lenses, however, are expensive. With so many choices, you need to be make sure you’re getting the right one for your needs. A well looked-after lens will last for years so it shouldn’t be a throwaway choice.

If you’re already an experienced photographer, this article probably isn’t for you. I’m not going to be recommending any super expensive, professional quality glass. Instead, I’m going to look at some of the best options for beginner and intermediate photographers who are looking to shoot new things.

Before diving in, it’s important to note that Canon has two different lens mounts: EF-S and EF. EF-S lenses will only work on crop sensor cameras like the entry-level Canon EOS Rebel T6. EF lenses will work on all Canon’s DSLRs.

If You Want to Shoot Portraits

For portraits, there are two things you need: a focal length of between about 50mm and 100mm, and a wide aperture. This focal length range gives you natural looking portraits without too much distortion and the wide aperture lets you blur the background to nothing.

The Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM fits both these criteria perfectly, and at $125 is an absolute steal. There are very few lenses this good, available that cheap. I still use the one I bought when I first started portrait photography regularly.

If You Want to Shoot Sports or Wildlife

Sports and wildlife photography are technically very similar: you want close up photos that show the action, but, whether because you’re stuck on the sideline or can’t sneak up on a wild…

How to Set Up the Canary Home Security Camera

The Canary home security camera is an easy-to-use camera that connects directly to your Wi-Fi network (or over ethernet) and lets you see what’s going on while you’re away from home. Here’s how to set it up and get started with it.

While the Nest Cam is one of the most popular Wi-Fi cams available, the Canary is a popular option that comes with some pretty cool extra features—like temperature monitoring, or the ability to provide humidity and air quality levels in the room that it’s in. Plus, you can connect it via ethernet rather than Wi-Fi if you want.

To set up the Canary camera, you’ll first want to download the app to your iPhone or Android device. We’ll be doing this setup through the iPhone app, but the process is largely the same on both mobile platforms.

Open up the app and tap on “Get Started”.

Enter in your email address and create a password for your Canary account. Then hit “Next” in the top-right corner of the screen.

Tap on “Accept” to accept Canary’s terms and policies.

Next, Enter in your name and phone number, and then tap “Next”.

On the next screen, you’ll select whether or not you want the app to have access to your location, which allows it to automatically know if you’re home or away. Select either “Now Now” or “Allow” at the bottom.

However, either way you’ll need to let the app know where you live, so it’s just a matter of the app finding your location automatically or manually entering in your location details on the next screen.

After that, select either “Not Now” or “Allow” when it comes to receiving notifications.

Next, it’s time to set up your Canary camera. In the app, select…

7 Useful Mods to Upgrade Your Smart Phone Camera

Snapping photos with a phone is fast becoming it’s own subgenre of photography: “iphoneography.” While the cameras in our phones get better and better, there are still some things — macroshots, decent lighting, the perfect selfie angle — that you can’t expect your phone to manage straight out of the box. To help you get some unique shots, here are TK projects to mod your smartphone and experiment with photography.

Gobo Arm Camera Phone Stand

Overhead shots can be notoriously tricky to get right if you’re holding your camera in your hands. If you’re doing a lot of “Step-by-step” photography, often overhead shots are the easiest way to illustrate a step (trust us, we should know!). This stand will latch onto your workbench allowing you to get your top-down shot without having to juggle your phone, your project, your tools, and allow you to focus on what’s really important: your hand modeling.

Inexpensive Digital Microscope

Perfect for the citizen scientist, this project uses the lens from a laser pointer and some cheap materials to create a digital microscope rig that just needs your phone’s…