Charlie Hunnam

Box Office: ‘King Arthur’ Takes $1.2M, ‘Snatched’ Grabs $650K Thursday

Courtesy of Warner Bros.

Holdover ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ is expected to top the domestic box office again this weekend.

Warner Bros.’ King Arthur: The Legend of the Sword earned an estimated $1.2 million in Thursday night previews while Fox’s comedy Snatched grabbed $650,000 from 2,625 locations.

King Arthur, helmed by Guy Ritchie and starring Charlie Hunnam and Jude Law, is projected to debut in the $25 million range domestically after costing Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow $175 million to produce before a major marketing spend.

The story follows Arthur, who had a tough upbringing in the back…

Guy Ritchie’s ‘King Arthur’ receives mixed reviews

  • This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Charlie Hunnam in a scene from,
    This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Charlie Hunnam in a scene from, “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword.” (Warner Bros. Pictures via AP)
  • This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Jude Law in a scene from,
    This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Jude Law in a scene from, “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword.” (Warner Bros. Pictures via AP)

Deep into Guy Ritchie’s “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword ,” a bad guy who we’ve never met before informs Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) and his mates that they’d better be at the castle before dark if they want to see “the boy” and “the girl” again. It’s one of those harmless, up the stakes clichés that’s all too common in action movies, but, in the flawed yet amusing “King Arthur,” it unwittingly left me baffled. “Which girl?” I wondered, sincerely doubting that this was the intended effect.

At this point there are two options: The Mage (Astrid Berges-Frisbey), a strange animal-controlling sorceress who we recently saw with a knife at her throat, or Maggie (Annabelle Wallis) who over the course of the movie is so underdeveloped that at different points I’d thought she was Arthur’s presumed to be dead mother (who is in fact played by the just similar enough-looking Poppy Delevingne) or the evil King Vortigern’s (Jude Law) wife. (She’s neither.) It’s a strange thing for a movie that is this packed to the brim with dialogue and clever exposition to have managed to so insufficiently explain a supposed key player. The film is somehow both overwritten and underwritten.

It’s a stretch to even deem it a King Arthur movie…