Childbirth

24 Gorgeous Birth Photos That Celebrate Labor And Delivery Nurses

Labor and delivery nurses are some of the most hardworking and supportive figures during childbirth.

From their medical care to their encouraging words to their comforting presence during difficult moments, nurses play a powerful role in the delivery room.

As we honor the last day of Nurse Appreciation Week, we’ve put together a collection of beautiful birth photos that celebrate labor and delivery nurses.

  • Paige Driscoll/Santa Cruz Birth Photography & Doula Services

    “As a doula and birth photographer I always want the best care for my clients. Nurses can play a huge role in a women’s birthing experience. Sarah Deitrich, an R.N. at Sutter Maternity & Surgery Center in Santa Cruz Ca, goes above and beyond with every patient she cares for her. Her kindness and expertise is like no other in her field. I know when my birthing mamas are in her care they will feel loved, supported, and respected. It is always a privilege when I get to work alongside her.”

  • Lore Photography

    “This amazing nurse called me over at just the right moment to see the doctors lift the baby up and out during a C-section; she made sure I had the best possible view for pictures throughout our time in the operating room.”

  • Elliana Gilbert
  • Colette Hoekstra/Coco Photography

    “Student midwife Kathy labored for over twenty hours, and L&D nurse Jen stayed by her side for hours. During the course of labor, they chatted and found out they were actually neighbors and are now great friends. What a wonderful way to start to a friendship!”

  • Erin Monroe

    “Mom was having a difficult time effectively pushing. The midwife and L&D nurse decided that the towel pull technique would be the best thing to try. This nurse was amazing! She not only stabilized the mom’s foot, she also pulled with the incredible strength, helping her successfully deliver her nine pound, five ounce son.”

  • Lore Photography

    “This male nurse wrapped baby up expertly in no time, then held him up in one hand like a football!”

  • Laureen Carruthers Photography

    “This was actually the nurse’s step grandson. Her husband passed away a couple of years prior to the birth, so it was very emotional.”

  • Capturing Joy Birth Services

    “This tiny baby was born via C-section at 25 weeks, and cared for diligently by her amazing team of nurses. You can tell they love their job!”

  • Kourtnie Elizabeth Photography
  • Leilani Rogers

    “This image shows a nurse comforting a mother after the sudden loss of her baby. It’s a sad story but sheds…

Dear Nurse…

Roberto Ganoza Photography, Alvin, TX

In recognition of National Nurses Week

I remember that day so well. I turned the corner on the way to labor and delivery and caught your eye. You flashed a big smile and said, “Go to room 13. I’m your nurse.” But your smile quickly faded when you saw my face. You knew I was worried. You knew something was wrong.

You quickly got me dressed and placed on the monitors. I was contracting. I was hurting. We both knew it was too early. I was trying not to cry, but I was scared. I could tell you were scared, too.

I was only 22 weeks pregnant with my twin babies.

You knew me as the strong, tough Dr. Clark. I was the doctor who worked alongside you on labor and delivery. The doctor who had delivered babies with you for the past thirteen years. The doctor who at age 42 desperately wanted to become a mother herself. The doctor who was finally pregnant after two years of infertility.

And now I was your patient. The patient who was vulnerable and afraid. The patient who was looking to you to make things better. The patient who for a moment forgot she was a doctor. The patient who didn’t want to lose her babies at 22 weeks.

I remember finally waking up from the medications that made me sleep. The contractions had stopped, and I was still pregnant. I had made it another day. From that moment on all I could do was hope for one more day. One more day to let my babies grow. One more day to increase their chance of survival.

Just one more day.

You will never know just how much you did for me that day or how much seeing your face gave me the strength to get through the most difficult time in my life. You will never know just how much you being there as my nurse meant to me. But it was you―my colleague, my nurse, my friend—who got me through the next 55 days in the hospital.

So thank you.

Thank you for coming into my room each day with a smile on your face even when I couldn’t see the light at the end of the tunnel. When I wanted to do anything but smile. When I felt fear and worry creeping in. You made each day a little bit better. You kept me going.

After days of being on medications and being in bed, my…

Vaccinating pregnant women protects newborns from whooping cough

pregnant woman getting a vaccine
A Tdap vaccine during pregnancy led to fewer newborns getting whooping cough in the two months after birth, a large study found.

When I was pregnant, my pronoun shifted automatically. My “I” turned into “we,” as in, “What are we going to eat for dinner?” and, “Should we sit in that hot tub?” I thought about that shift to the majestic plural as we got our Tdap shot in our third trimester.

The Tdap vaccine protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, or whooping cough. Doctors recommend that women receive a dose with each pregnancy because the diseases can be particularly dangerous for young babies. But good, hard evidence for the benefits of vaccinating women while pregnant instead of shortly after giving birth has been lacking. A new study of nearly 150,000 newborns fills that gap for whooping cough.

Researchers at the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center in Oakland, Calif., studied the medical records of mothers who gave birth to babies between 2010 and 2015. Overall, about 46 percent of the mothers received a Tdap vaccine at least 8 days before giving birth.

Seventeen of the 150,000 babies got whooping cough by the time…

Vaccinating pregnant women protects newborns from whooping cough

pregnant woman getting a vaccine
A Tdap vaccine during pregnancy led to fewer newborns getting whooping cough in the two months after birth, a large study found.

When I was pregnant, my pronoun shifted automatically. My “I” turned into “we,” as in, “What are we going to eat for dinner?” and, “Should we sit in that hot tub?” I thought about that shift to the majestic plural as we got our Tdap shot in our third trimester.

The Tdap vaccine protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, or whooping cough. Doctors recommend that women receive a dose with each pregnancy because the diseases can be particularly dangerous for young babies. But good, hard evidence for the benefits of vaccinating women while pregnant instead of shortly after giving birth has been lacking. A new study of nearly 150,000 newborns fills that gap for whooping cough.

Researchers at the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center in Oakland, Calif., studied the medical records of mothers who gave birth to babies between 2010 and 2015. Overall, about 46 percent of the mothers received a Tdap vaccine at least 8 days before giving birth.

Seventeen of the 150,000 babies got whooping cough by the time…