Circulatory system

Lungs enlist immune cells to fight infections in capillaries

neutrophils
ON TRACK Neutrophils (red) crawl along the walls of capillaries in a mouse lung (tracks shown in blue). In mice deficient in a key protein, these immune cells couldn’t move as far (left) as those in mice that had the protein (right).

Immune cells in the lungs provide a rapid counterattack to bloodstream infections, a new study in mice finds. This surprising discovery pegs the lungs as a major pillar in the body’s defense during these dangerous infections, the researchers say.

“No one would have guessed the lung would provide such an immediate and strong host defense system,” says Bryan Yipp, an immunologist at the University of Calgary in Canada. Yipp and his colleagues report their findings online April 28 in Science Immunology.

The work may offer ways to target and adjust our own immune defense system for infections, says Yipp. “Currently, we only try to kill the bacteria, but we are running out of antibiotics because of resistance.”

The research uncovers some of the mechanisms that drive the rapid activation of neutrophils, says immunologist Andrew Gelman of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. “This is critical in removing bacteria from sequestered spaces in the lung,” he says.

Generally, clearing bacteria out of the bloodstream falls to macrophages that reside in the liver and the spleen. But macrophages aren’t found in vessels of the lungs. So the lungs’ blood vessel network gives pathogens a place to hide and escape the body’s usual removal efforts.

In…

Do You Know This Powerful Yellow Powder Is What You Need In Your Healthy Diet.

Turmeric, Curcuma longa or “Indian saffron” has been a part of the healthy dieting trend for quite some time, and it isn’t without a good reason. Traditionally Asian, the plant belongs to the ginger family and it gives curry its yellowish color and warm, bitter taste. With an amazing array of health benefits it offers, it is no wonder that it has been quickly adopted by the health conscious eaters around the world.

Originating in Southern Asia, traditionally, turmeric root (usually dried and cooked and turned into powder) has been used as a spice for dishes in the traditional cuisine, fabric or food coloring aid, and for medical purposes due to its anti-inflammatory effect and great aid in curing bruises, blood in the urine and toothache. With numerous clinical trials testing its active compound curcumin, turmeric has now been proven to improve brain health, cardiovascular health and tissue health. 1 2

Turmeric main nutrients

Serving Size: 1 tbsp (7 grams)

  • Calories 24
  • Calories from Fat 6
  • Total Fat 1 g 1%
  • Saturated Fat 0 g 1%
  • Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
  • Sodium 3 mg 0%
  • Total Carbohydrates 4 g 4%
  • Dietary Fiber 1 g 6%
  • Vitamin C 3%

With no sugar, 16% of iron and 1g of protein per 7 grams, turmeric is a beneficial aid in daily nutrition.

Health benefits of turmeric

Turmeric improves digestion

Turmeric has positive effect on the digestion. As the 2015 research shows 3, turmeric and ginger help in curing stomach ulcer. Stomach ulcer develops as a result of an imbalance between digestive fluids in the stomach and duodenum and a Helicobacter pylori bacteria that cause pain in the stomach lining. According to the research turmeric “inhibited ulcer by 84.7%” adding that “ethanol-induced lesions such as necrosis, erosion and hemorrhage of the stomach wall were significantly reduced after oral administration of essential oils”.

Turmeric aids in depression treatment

A study 4 published in the Journal of Affective Disorders shows that turmeric has the potential for treating major depressive disorder. A randomized, placebo-controlled study found a significant antidepressant effect of turmeric on people with major depressive disorder. A 2007 study 5 also found that turmeric could be an effective anti-depressant agent.

Turmeric treats rheumatoid arthritis

In a 2012 randomized, pilot study 6 the effects of turmeric on rheumatoid arthritis were tested and they showed surprisingly great results. Turmeric actually showed better results of improvement of the condition than the traditionally used drug diclofenac sodium.

Turmeric regulates lipid levels

A 1992 study 7 shows that active compound of turmeric, curcumin, taken daily, can help regulate the lipid levels in humans by increasing “good” cholesterol and decreasing “bad” cholesterol. Namely, “a…