Coeliac disease

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Gluten free..Gluten free.. What exactly is gluten?

Well, Let us start here. Gluten is controversial. Some claim it is safe unless you have celiac disease. And experts in the nutrition and health fields. They claim gluten is harmful to all.

Gluten is a protein found in rye, barley, oat and wheat . Wheat is the most commonly consumed form. When you mix flour and water, it becomes like sticky glue. A property that makes dough elastic and rise when baked. It provides that satisfying chewy kind of texture. The name gluten is actually derived from this sticky wet dough formation.

Why is Gluten bad?

Many tolerate gluten, right. However, the problems are associated with some health conditions. This is inclusive of gluten sensitivity, wheat allergy, and celiac disease

Celiac disease also is known as coeliac disease an extremely severe gluten intolerance form. This autoimmune disorder treats gluten as an invasive element. The immune system attacks the gut lining and the gluten.

The gut wall is damaged and this may result in nutrient deficiencies, digestive issues, anemia and increases the risk to other diseases.

Common symptoms include:

  • digestive discomfort
  • small intestine tissue damage
  • bloating
  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • fatigue
  • headache
  • skin rashes
  • weight loss
  • depression
  • feces that have a foul smell.

Celiac disease is not easy to diagnose, as not all symptoms may exist. About 80 % of people that have celiac disease are unaware that they have the condition

Many do not test positive for celiac disease but they do not react well to gluten. This gluten sensitivity is non-celiac. The symptoms include diarrhea, tiredness, and stomach pain. Bloating, tiredness and depression.

Is…

Common virus may be celiac disease culprit

reovirus
A VIRAL TRIGGER A reovirus (illustrated here) may jump-start celiac disease by turning the immune system against gluten, a new study in mice suggests.

A common and usually harmless virus may trigger celiac disease. Infection with the suspected culprit, a reovirus, could cause the immune system to react to gluten as if it was a dangerous pathogen instead of a harmless food protein, an international team of researchers reports April 7 in Science.

In a study in mice, the researchers found that the reovirus, T1L, tricks the immune system into mounting an attack against innocent food molecules. The virus first blocks the immune system’s regulatory response that usually gives non-native substances, like food proteins, the OK, Terence Dermody, a virologist at the University of Pittsburgh, and colleagues found. Then the virus prompts a harmful inflammatory response.

“Viruses have been suspected as potential triggers of autoimmune or food allergy–related diseases for decades,” says Herbert Virgin, a viral immunologist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. This study provides new data on how a viral infection can change the immune system’s response to food, says Virgin, who wasn’t involved in the study.

Reoviruses aren’t deadly. Almost everyone has been infected with a reovirus, and almost no one gets sick, Dermody says. But if the first exposure to a food with gluten occurs during infection, the virus may…