Cooking

Google Home Will Now Read Cooking Directions Out Loud

When it comes to home voice assistants, there’s no denying that the bulk of their usage comes in the kitchen for setting timers and playing audio. Google’s taking that to the next logical step with Google Home, which can now read recipes out loud.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Pick a recipe using the Google Assistant on Android or Google Search (which is now just called Google) app (on iOS or Android).
  2. Tap the “Send to Google Home” button when you find a recipe you want to…

The Grown-Up Kitchen: How to Time Your Cooking So Everything Is Ready at Once

Photo by Damian Siwiaszczyk.

When preparing a “square” meal—you know, the kind with a protein and at least two sides—I rarely struggle with the actual cooking. I can cook a chicken, mash some potatoes, and roast a sheet pan of broccoli without any issue, but timing it all so everything ends up on the table simultaneously—hot and ready—is what gives me trouble.

I’ve been cooking for a long time, and even I struggle with timing, particularly when working with new foods or recipes. The more cooking you do, the more intuitive timing becomes, but it can still be overwhelming. Given the fact that there are an infinite number of combinations of an infinite number of recipes, it’s hard to right a Complete Definitive End-All Guide on the subject, but I can give you some basic tips and guidelines for streamlining and timing a meal that all comes together at once. Spoiler alert: it involves a fair amount of planning.

Step One: Make Good Choices and Keep Things Simple

Photo by baron valium

Everyone loves a new and exciting recipe, but making a new dish for the first time almost always takes longer than you expect. Whether you’re learning how to break down a new vegetable, working with a new piece of meat, or trying an entirely new cooking method, it’s going to take longer than the estimated recipe time. You should give yourself an extra 15 minutes of cooking and prep time to account for this, but you should also make sure that the other dishes you’re preparing are things you’re familiar with.

Also, don’t go crazy with the menu. Know what you’re going to make ahead of time and stick to it, and resist the urge to make absolutely everything yourself. Yes, you can make your own salad dressing, but rifling through the fridge to find mustard, vinegar, and half a shallot you saw somewhere in there earlier this week can add time and distract you from the rest of the meal prep. You’ve already washed, chopped, and tossed all the components to make a nice, fresh salad, and no one is going to be mad if you plunk a couple of bottles of olive oil and vinegar down instead of whipping up a vinaigrette.

In terms of how many components your meal should have, that depends on you and your comfort level. For a weeknight meal, I tend to stick to a protein, a cooked veg or starch, and something made of raw plant parts (when tomatoes are in season, I just slice them and sprinkle them with salt for the easiest side ever), but there’s nothing wrong with serving a single side, or—in the case of soups, stews, and casseroles—a good piece of bread. No matter how many you choose, it’s important that you stick to your choices. Once that’s done, you’re ready to plan your attack.

Step Two: Make a Timeline

Photo by Rebecca Siegel.

First, decide on when dinner is going to be served, and work backwards from there. Write down everything you’re making, with recipe times and cooking temperatures beside each item. If you’re not working from a recipe, a quick Google search can usually reveal this information. If you just want to roast some vegetables, it sure helps to have a handle on how quickly different types of vegetables roast. Below are some general roasting times for cooking vegetables in a 425-degree oven, but keep in mind that these can be affected by how small you cut them up:

  • Thin and soft vegetables: (Yellow squash, zucchini, peppers, green beans, asparagus, tomatoes) 10-20 minutes
  • Greens: (Kale, mustard greens, collard greens) 6-10…

Nomiku simplifies sous vide cooking with new device that prepares food using RFID scanner

Two years ago, Nomiku began its journey to bring its Wi-Fi-enabled sous vide device to market, first raising $750,000 through a Kickstarter campaign and then adding $250,000 more during an appearance on the reality show Shark Tank. More than $3 million worth of products has been sold, and on Wednesday, the company is expanding its cooking technology to include not just a meal program, but also a sous chef device that will properly prepare meals automatically — all you have to do is scan the package.

Nomiku’s main product is a connected sous vide immersion circulator that will heat up whatever you’re cooking to the right temperature every time, whether it’s a steak, fish, or whatever. But that still requires some manual labor, such as prep time and figuring out what you want to eat. Today’s updates further simplify the process.

Above: Nomiku meal: Chicken thigh in Thai yellow curry.

With meals priced between $8 and $14 for entrees and $4 and $6 for sides, Nomiku is taking a step to make it more convenient for people to eat instead of spending excess time in the preparation process. Some of the dishes you can order include braised red cabbage, charred sweet potatoes with lime and cumin, jasmine rice with fried shallot, and pork shoulder with chipotle adobo. If you order $80 worth of…

Do You Know This Powerful Yellow Powder Is What You Need In Your Healthy Diet.

Turmeric, Curcuma longa or “Indian saffron” has been a part of the healthy dieting trend for quite some time, and it isn’t without a good reason. Traditionally Asian, the plant belongs to the ginger family and it gives curry its yellowish color and warm, bitter taste. With an amazing array of health benefits it offers, it is no wonder that it has been quickly adopted by the health conscious eaters around the world.

Originating in Southern Asia, traditionally, turmeric root (usually dried and cooked and turned into powder) has been used as a spice for dishes in the traditional cuisine, fabric or food coloring aid, and for medical purposes due to its anti-inflammatory effect and great aid in curing bruises, blood in the urine and toothache. With numerous clinical trials testing its active compound curcumin, turmeric has now been proven to improve brain health, cardiovascular health and tissue health. 1 2

Turmeric main nutrients

Serving Size: 1 tbsp (7 grams)

  • Calories 24
  • Calories from Fat 6
  • Total Fat 1 g 1%
  • Saturated Fat 0 g 1%
  • Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
  • Sodium 3 mg 0%
  • Total Carbohydrates 4 g 4%
  • Dietary Fiber 1 g 6%
  • Vitamin C 3%

With no sugar, 16% of iron and 1g of protein per 7 grams, turmeric is a beneficial aid in daily nutrition.

Health benefits of turmeric

Turmeric improves digestion

Turmeric has positive effect on the digestion. As the 2015 research shows 3, turmeric and ginger help in curing stomach ulcer. Stomach ulcer develops as a result of an imbalance between digestive fluids in the stomach and duodenum and a Helicobacter pylori bacteria that cause pain in the stomach lining. According to the research turmeric “inhibited ulcer by 84.7%” adding that “ethanol-induced lesions such as necrosis, erosion and hemorrhage of the stomach wall were significantly reduced after oral administration of essential oils”.

Turmeric aids in depression treatment

A study 4 published in the Journal of Affective Disorders shows that turmeric has the potential for treating major depressive disorder. A randomized, placebo-controlled study found a significant antidepressant effect of turmeric on people with major depressive disorder. A 2007 study 5 also found that turmeric could be an effective anti-depressant agent.

Turmeric treats rheumatoid arthritis

In a 2012 randomized, pilot study 6 the effects of turmeric on rheumatoid arthritis were tested and they showed surprisingly great results. Turmeric actually showed better results of improvement of the condition than the traditionally used drug diclofenac sodium.

Turmeric regulates lipid levels

A 1992 study 7 shows that active compound of turmeric, curcumin, taken daily, can help regulate the lipid levels in humans by increasing “good” cholesterol and decreasing “bad” cholesterol. Namely, “a…

What’s Cooking: What Do You Cook to Impress?

Hey there, and welcome back to to What’s Cooking?, the weekly open thread where you get to share your brilliant thoughts, advice, recipes, and opinions on all things edible. This week I want to talk about the meal you make when you want to impress and delight, and get your tips and tricks for making a big impact with little effort.

It’s probably no surprise that my Anova Precision Cooker factors into my “impressive meals” in a large way. Sous-vide rib eye, lamb chops, and (as of last week) oxtail are all permanent fixtures in my cook-to-impress repertoire because they are:

  1. Very hard to mess up
  2. Delicious
  3. Fairly hands-off, meaning I can focus on a…

The “Forgotten” Uses For Everyday Objects

Objects we consider ordinary and useful become strange and obsolete as time goes by unless we pass down the knowledge of where each object came from and its intended use.

Let’s start with the loop on the back of men’s (and some women’s) shirts- they’re called locker loops, and they’re thought to have originated with sailors, who would “hang their shirts on ship hooks while changing”.

Nowadays they’re rarely used for their intended purpose since we use hangers more than hooks, and some school kids even cut them off as a “fashion statement”.

Cooking More at Home Is About Developing Systems, Not Memorizing Recipes

The recipe community makes it seem like one-and-done type meals are the pinnacle of home cooking. And if you crack open a cookbook or browse a few food blogs, that’s mostly what you’ll see. But for people who don’t already have experience in the kitchen, this is wildly inefficient.

Say you want to cook a typical, single-meal recipe you found for dinner. Think about that process for minute. You have to decide on the recipe, stop at the store on your way home from work, pick out all the ingredients you need (because that great-looking recipe always has a few secret, fancy ingredients you don’t have at home), then drive home and finally cook it.

Sure, meal-kit services like Blue Apron and Hello Fresh can ease some…

Best Money Tips: Cook Healthier With These Ingredient Substitutions

Welcome to Wise Bread’s Best Money Tips Roundup! Today we found articles on ingredient substitutions for healthier cooking, work from home jobs you should avoid, and habits of irresistible people.

Top 5 Articles

6 Ingredient Substitutions for Healthier Cooking — Instead of adding cream to your coffee or tea, try coconut milk. It isn’t low fat or low calorie, but you’re trading empty calories and fat for healthy fat that can make you feel fuller. [$5 Dinners]

10 Work From Home Jobs You Should Avoid at All Costs — Craft making sounds like a fun way to make money, but most of these jobs require you to pay for the materials up front and won’t pay you for the final product. [SheBudgets]

10 Habits of Irresistible People — Irresistible people make sure to be friendly but never fake. [PopSugar Smart Living]

Apartment Gardening: 3 Ways to Bring In the Outdoors — Choose plants that can…

The Essential Keys to Making Perfect Sushi Rice

Rice is the most important component of sushi. In fact, the word “sushi” refers to the vinegared rice used for the Japanese dish. If you want to make decent sushi at home, you need to know how to prepare the rice first.

In this video, from the ChefSteps YouTube channel, chef Taichi Kitamura of Sushi Kappo Tamura demonstrates the best method for cooking and handling rice. For starters, make sure you’re working with short-grained sushi rice. Each grain is smaller, plumper, and stickier than normal rice. And make sure you’re using a rice cooker. You can cook rice other ways, but rice cookers…