Death

Carrie Fisher Died of Sleep Apnea and Used Drugs, Report Reveals — as Daughter Billie Releases Emotional Statement

Carrie Fisher’s death was caused by sleep apnea and other undetermined factors, the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office revealed on Friday, according to multiple reports.

The coroner also said Fisher suffered from atherosclerotic heart disease and “drug use,” but no specifics were given. According to the Associated Press, the report stated Fisher had taken multiple drugs prior to her death.

“The manner of death has been ruled undetermined,” the report concluded.

In an exclusive statement to PEOPLE, Fisher’s only child, Billie Lourd, addressed the report.

“My mom battled drug addiction and mental illness her entire life. She ultimately died of it. She was purposefully open in all of her work about the social stigmas surrounding these diseases.

“She talked about the shame that torments people and their families confronted by these diseases. I know my Mom, she’d want her death to encourage people to be open about their struggles. Seek help, fight for government funding for mental health programs. Shame and those social stigmas are the enemies of progress to solutions and ultimately a cure. Love you Momby.”

The actress, best known as Star Wars‘ Princess Leia Organa, suffered a heart attack at the end of last…

Chris Cornell Autopsy Report: ‘Drugs Did Not Contribute’ to Death

Drugs did not contribute to Chris Cornell’s death, says a new autopsy and toxicology report. Buda Mendes/Getty

Michigan’s Wayne County Medical Examiner released the autopsy and toxicology report in the death of Chris Cornell Friday, with the coroner confirming that the manner of death was suicide and that “drugs did not contribute to the cause of death.”

“It is my opinion that death was caused by hanging,” Wayne County assistant medical examiner Theodore Brown wrote in his post mortem report in documents obtained by Rolling Stone. “Based on the circumstances surrounding this death and the autopsy findings, the manner of death is suicide.”

The medical examiner then reiterated the circumstances of Cornell’s death as found in the police report, which stated that Cornell was “found partially suspended by a resistance exercise band in his hotel room.”

The injuries sustained “were all consistent with hanging,…

Death by asteroid may come in unexpected ways

asteroid breakup
asteroid breakup

Every now and then a really big rock from space comes careening through Earth’s atmosphere. Depending on its size, angle of approach and where it lands, few people may notice — or millions could face a risk of imminent death.

Concern about these occasional, but potentially catastrophic, events keeps some astronomers scanning the skies. Using all types of technologies, they’re scouting for a killer asteroid, one that could snuff out life in a brief but dramatic cataclysm. They’re also looking for ways to potentially deter an incoming biggie from an earthboard path.

But if a big space rock were to make it to Earth’s surface, what could people expect? That’s a question planetary scientists have been asking themselves — and their computers. And some of their latest answers might surprise you.

For instance, it’s not likely a tsunami will take you out. Nor an earthquake. Few would need to even worry about being vaporized by the friction-heated space rock. No, gusting winds and shock waves set off by falling and exploding space rocks would claim the most lives. That’s one of the conclusions of a new computer model.

It investigated the likely outcomes of more than a million possible asteroid impacts. In one extreme case, a space rock 200 meters (660 feet) wide whizzes 20 kilometers (12 miles) per second into London, England. This smashup would kill more than 8.7 million people, computers estimate. And nearly three-quarters of those expected to die in that doomsday scenario would lose their lives to winds and shock waves.

Clemens Rumpf and his colleagues reported this online March 27 in Meteoritics & Planetary Science. Rumpf is a planetary scientist in England at the University of Southampton.

In a second report, Rumpf’s group looked at 1.2 million potential smashups. Here, the asteroids could be up to 400 meters (1,300 feet) across. Again, winds and shock waves were the big killers. They’d account for about six in every 10 deaths across the spectrum of asteroid sizes, the computer simulations showed.

Many previous studies had suggested tsunamis would be the top killer. But in these analyses, those killer waves claimed only around one in every five of the lives lost.

Even asteroids that explode before reaching Earth’s surface can generate high-speed wind gusts, shock waves of pressure in the atmosphere and intense heat. Space rocks big enough to survive the descent pose far greater risks. They can spawn earthquakes, tsunamis, flying debris — and, of course, gaping craters.

“These asteroids aren’t an everyday concern,” Rumpf observes. Yet clearly, he notes, the risks they pose “can be severe.” His team describes just how severe they could be in a paper posted online April 19 in Geophysical Research Letters.

Previous studies typically considered individually each possible effect of an asteroid impact. Rumpf’s group instead looked at them collectively. Quantifying the estimated hazard posed by each effect, says Steve Chesley, might one day help some leaders make one of the hardest calls imaginable — work to deflect an asteroid or just let it hit. Chesley is a planetary scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. (NASA stands for National Aeronautics and Space Administration.) Chesley was not involved with either of the new studies.

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asteroid Earth
Computer simulations reveal that most of the deaths caused by an earthbound asteroid (illustrated) would come from gusting winds and shock waves.

Land hits would pose the biggest risks

The 1.2 million simulated asteroid impacts each fell into one of 50,000 scenarios. They varied in location, speed and angle of strike. Each scenario was run for 24 different asteroids. Their diameters ranged from 15 to 400 meters (50 to 1,300 feet). About 71 percent of the Earth is covered by water, so the simulations let asteroids descend over water in nearly 36,000 of the scenarios (about 72 percent).

The researchers began with a map of human…

‘Bachelor’ Chris Soules Breaks His Silence for the First Time Since His Arrest, Fatal Accident (EXCLUSIVE)

Chris soules arrest

Bachelor star Chris Soules has spoken out for the first time since his involvement in a fatal accident that claimed the life of fellow farmer Kenneth Mosher.

“My family and I are overwhelmed with this tragedy, but we are sticking together and we’ll get through it,” the 35-year-old Iowa native tells In Touch exclusively. “Thank you for reaching out.”

Chris Soules Splash
Chris Soules Splash

(Photo Credit: Splash)

As it’s been previously reported, the reality star was behind the wheel of his 2008 Chevrolet truck when he crashed into a John Deere tractor driven by 66-year-old Mosher. While it’s been reported that Chris checked the victim’s pulse and called 911, he later fled the scene by foot and was promptly arrested about five hours later at his home in Arlington, IA, in the early hours of the morning on Tuesday, April 25.

He was charged with leaving the scene of an accident…

Starving Dog Found Dying On A Sidewalk Gets Some Love, And It’s Hard To Believe It’s The Same Dog

Meet Spirit Golden Heart, a pit bull doggie who was found by LAPD officers on the streets of LA, being so starved, she was barely alive. “She was hours away from death with large fat ticks feeding off her starving body and maggots thriving in open wounds,” Ghetto Rescue wrote on their website.

“We named her Spirit Golden Heart (can you spot the golden heart on her body?) because we knew that she was strong”. The rescuers rushed Spirit to the vet where her healing journey began. Soon they discovered the doggie had polyarthritis, followed by fevers and swolen joints.

“After receiving an enormous amount of IV fluids, blood transfusions, numerous visits to the doctor and…