Desktop metaphor

Facebook brings out a new ‘Order Food’ option

Facebook brings out a new ‘Order Food’ option

Facebook is rolling out a new food ordering option on its app and desktop site. If you go to the desktop “Explore” section, or the app menu, and click on the hamburger icon, you’ll be redirected to a page full of nearby restaurants that deliver through Facebook.

From the restaurant list, you can either go to each place’s Facebook page and order there, or select Start Order. You…

Xamarin Live Player makes debugging mobile apps as easy as scanning a QR code

Xamarin Live Player makes debugging mobile apps as easy as scanning a QR code

Debugging mobile apps on a desktop device is a pain, especially if you’re a new developer trying to get started. You have to install a bazillion resources just to start, and testing an iOS app with a Windows PC is a hassle, to say the least. Xamarin’s new Live Player wants to change all that, and make debugging an app as simple as scanning a QR Code.

Normally, debugging an app means installing gigabytes of SDKs and emulators, which can take…

How to Use Multiple Monitors to Be More Productive

three-monitors-one-computer

Many people swear by multiple monitors, whether they’re computer geeks or just people who need to be productive. Why use just one monitor when you can use two or more and see more at once?

Additional monitors allow you to expand your desktop, getting more screen real estate for your open programs. Windows makes it very easy to set up additional monitors, and your computer probably has the necessary ports.

Why Use Multiple Monitors?

multiple-monitors-in-use

Multiple monitors give you more screen real estate. When you hook multiple monitors up to a computer, you can move your mouse back and forth between them, dragging programs between monitors as if you had an extra-large desktop. That way, rather than Alt+Tabbing and task switching to glance at another window, you can just look over with your eyes and then look back to the program you’re using.

Some examples of use cases for multiple monitors include:

  • Coders who want to view their code on one display with the other display reserved for documentation. They can just glance over at the documentation and look back at their primary workspace.
  • Anyone who needs to view something while working. Viewing a web page while writing an email, viewing another document while writing an something, or working with two large spreadsheets and having both visible at once.
  • People who need to keep an eye on information, whether it’s email or up-to-date statistics, while working.
  • Gamers who want to see more of the game world, extending the game across multiple displays.
  • Geeks who just want to watch a video on one screen while doing something else on the other screen.

If you just have a single monitor, you can also use the Snap feature to quickly place multiple Windows applications side by side. But how useful this feature is depends on your monitor’s size and resolution. If you have a large, high-resolution monitor, it will allow you to see a lot. But for many monitors (especially those on laptops), things will seem very cramped. That’s where dual monitors can come in handy.

Hooking Up Multiple Monitors

vga-port-next-to-dvi-port

Hooking up an additional monitor to your computer should be very simple. Most new desktop computers come with more than one port for a monitor—whether DisplayPort, DVI, HDMI, the older VGA port, or a mix. Some computers may include splitter cables that allow you to connect multiple monitors to a single port.

Most laptops also come with ports that allow you to hook up an external monitor. Plug a monitor into your laptop’s DisplayPort, DVI, or HDMI port and Windows will allow you to use both your laptop’s integrated display and the external monitor at once (see the instructions in the next section).

This all depends on the ports your computer has and how your monitor connects. If you have an old VGA monitor lying around and you have a modern laptop with only DVI or HDMI connectors, you may need an adapter that allows you to plug your monitor’s VGA cable into the new port. Be sure to take your computer’s ports into account…

Desktop Users Can Now Upload To Instagram Without The App – Here’s How

Can We Pop The Silicon Valley Bubble?

A recent update to Instagram’s website has just enabled a feature which users of iPads and desktop PCs everywhere have been crying out for since the start. You can now upload images directly from a browser without the need to use the Instagram app and it’s trivially easy for Chrome users.

You can now upload photos to Instagram using Chrome
You can now upload photos to Instagram using Chrome

Paul Monckton

You can now upload photos to Instagram using Chrome

Now if you want to upload images directly from a PC, a Mac or even a Chromebook, you can do so without having to first transfer the pictures to your phone. It’s also great news for iPad users who, until now, have had to use an ill-fitting iPhone version of the app to access the service from their devices.

Recently added support for photo uploads from mobile browsers makes Instagram accessible to more users worldwide by removing the reliance on expensive mobile devices and app downloads where mobile data may not be cheaply available.

However, there are still several features missing from the mobile browser-based interface, such as live video, stories and the ability to apply filters, all of which are highly popular Instagram features.

Furthermore, Instagram isn’t fully embracing the idea of uploading from the desktop just yet, as it’s only the mobile version of the website which currently supports image uploading. Using Instagram from a normal desktop browser won’t provide any image upload capability unless you do a little trick first.

If you want to upload from a desktop browser, you’ll have to manually select…

What Is Windows S, and How Is It Different?

Windows 10 S is “the soul of today’s Windows”, according to Microsoft. It’s a new version of Windows intended for school PCs, but available to everyone. It’s designed to be more simple and streamlined, so it only runs applications from the Windows Store—unless you spend another $50 to upgrade to Windows 10 Pro.

Microsoft announced that Acer, Asus, Dell, Fujitsu, HP, Samsung, and Toshiba will ship Windows 10 S education PCs starting at $189, starting this summer. Microsoft is also releasing a $999 Surface Laptop, which runs Windows 10 S.

How Is Windows 10 S Different?

The biggest difference in Windows 10 S is that can only run apps downloaded from the Windows Store. These apps are checked for security and run in a secure container. This ensures that applications can’t mess with your registry, leave files behind, or cause problems with the rest of your PC. You can get the same benefits by running those new Universal apps from the Windows Store on a Windows 10 PC. But unlike normal Windows 10, you won’t have the option of downloading other apps that aren’t available in the store.

Thankfully, full versions of Microsoft Office 365 applications—Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and OneNote—are coming to the Windows Store soon. They’re packaged using Microsoft’s Project Centennial, which allows traditional Windows desktop applications to be run in a secure container and placed in the Windows Store. The application’s developer just has to package the application and submit it to the Store. Hopefully, Windows 10 S will give more desktop application developers the push to do so.

As Microsoft noted at its May 2 event, “Windows 10 S can run any web browser in the Windows Store”. That just includes Microsoft Edge right now, but Microsoft clearly wants Google and Mozilla…

How to Move the “Show Desktop” Icon to the Quick Launch Bar or the Taskbar in Windows

If you aren’t a fan of scrolling your pointer over to the lower right corner of your monitor to show the desktop, we have a cool tweak that will allow you to add the Show Desktop icon to the Quick Launch bar or anywhere on your Taskbar.

If you want to easily get access to the Desktop in Windows 7, 8, or 10, you’ve undoubtedly noticed they moved the Show Desktop to the lower right corner of the screen. This can be annoying if you have a dual monitors, or even a large monitor.

There are a couple of ways you can make the Show Desktop icon more accessible. We’ll take a look at each and you can choose which method works best for you. We show both methods in Windows 10, but they will also work in Windows 7 and 8.

How to Put the Show Desktop Icon Back to Where it Used to Be by Adding Back the Quick Launch Bar

The first method of moving the Show Desktop icon is to add back the Quick Launch bar to the Taskbar. The Quick Launch bar contains a Show Desktop option, so once you follow the steps in our article to bring back the Quick Launch bar, you should see the Show Desktop icon on the left side of the Taskbar. If you don’t, the article also describes how to move icons on the Quick Launch bar.

This method will “kill two birds with one stone” by getting the Quick Launch bar and the Show Desktop icon back where they used to be in Windows.

How to Pin the Show Desktop Icon to the Taskbar

If you don’t want the Quick Launch bar back, you could pin the icon to the Taskbar instead. Unfortunately, the process isn’t as easy as a simple drag and drop, but there is an easy workaround.

Right-click on any empty area of the desktop and go to New > Text Document.

Rename the shortcut to Show Desktop.exe.

NOTE: You will need to have file extensions showing in order for this to work.

The following warning…

How to Pin an External Drive to the Windows Taskbar

Do you have an external drive connected to your Windows computer and would like to access it from the Taskbar? Here we show you a workaround that will allow you to pin it to Taskbar.

We’ll show you how to add an external drive icon to the Taskbar in Windows 10, but this trick will also work in Windows 7 and 8.

You would think the process would be as easy as dragging the external drive icon to the Taskbar. Unfortunately, that isn’t the case. If you try to drag the external drive icon to the Taskbar, it just adds it to File Explorer.

Then, if you right-click on the File Explorer icon, you’ll be able to access it from there. This might be enough for some users, but we want to add it to the Taskbar as an icon.

With a quick workaround, we can add the drive as an icon to the Taskbar. However, before doing this, we need to assign a persistent drive letter to our external drive. We’re going to add a drive letter to the external drive’s icon on the Taskbar, so that drive letter needs to stay the same every time you connect the drive to your PC.

Once you’ve assigned the drive letter to your external drive, right-click on an empty area on your desktop and go to New > Text Document.

Then, name the text file whatever you want and change the .txt extension to .exe . In our example, we’re adding the external N:\ drive, so we named it Drive N.exe . Press Enter.

After pressing Enter, you will see a dialog box asking if you’re sure you…