Disability

Inside The Coffee Shop Providing Jobs To 40 People With Disabilities

A coffee shop in North Carolina is helping its employees with disabilities ― all 40 of them ― show the world what they can do.

Bitty and Beau’s Coffee opened in January 2016. Its 40 employees have a variety of intellectual and developmental disabilities including Down syndrome, autism and cerebral palsy. Some don’t have a formal diagnosis. The shop, located in Wilmington, North Carolina, also has two typically-abled managers.

Bitty & Beau’s Coffee
Bitty and Beau’s Coffee currently has 40 employees with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Amy Wright, who co-founded the shop with her husband, Ben Wright, had always wanted to participate in something impactful for people with disabilities, especially for her two children with Down syndrome, 7-year-old Bitty and 12-year-old Beau, who are the namesakes of the coffee shop. Amy described having two kids with Down syndrome as a “rare occurrence” that she and her husband are “so blessed” to experience.

“We say we’ve won the lottery twice,” she told HuffPost. “That’s what we like to say.”

After several fundraisers, walks and concerts, Amy decided to raise more awareness about

First Ultra-Accessible Waterpark for the Disabled Just Opened its Doors

America’s first ultra-accessible waterpark has just opened its doors to the public on Saturday.

The $17 million San Antonio waterpark, Morgan’s Inspiration Island, has dozens of features that make it the most handicap-accessible park in the country.

The park, which is a nonprofit organization, offers special passes to kids who have trouble waiting in lines; the water temperature can be adjusted for guests who have sensory issues; the water is constantly filtered and reused for kids with immune issues (and for the environment); all of the rides are wheelchair accessible; and every visitor with disabilities is given free admission.

RELATED: Child With Invisible Disability Creates Bathroom Sign With Go-Ahead from Government

Children who have a tendency to wander are given waterproof wristbands with GPS so parents and staff can easily locate the youngsters in the park, if necessary.

In order to prevent overcrowding, admission to the park is also limited. Parents are encouraged to purchase tickets online in order to guarantee attendance.

The…

First Ultra-Accessible Waterpark for the Disabled Just Opened its Doors

America’s first ultra-accessible waterpark has just opened its doors to the public on Saturday.

The $17 million San Antonio waterpark, Morgan’s Inspiration Island, has dozens of features that make it the most handicap-accessible park in the country.

The park, which is a nonprofit organization, offers special passes to kids who have trouble waiting in lines; the water temperature can be adjusted for guests who have sensory issues; the water is constantly filtered and reused for kids with immune issues (and for the environment); all of the rides are wheelchair accessible; and every visitor with disabilities is given free admission.

RELATED: Child With Invisible Disability Creates Bathroom Sign With Go-Ahead from Government

Children who have a tendency to wander are given waterproof wristbands with GPS so parents and staff can easily locate the youngsters in the park, if necessary.

In order to prevent overcrowding, admission to the park is also limited. Parents are encouraged to purchase tickets online in order to guarantee attendance.

The…

This Awesome Water Park Was Designed For Kids With Disabilities

A new water park in San Antonio is making sure kids with disabilities don’t miss out on the splashing fun this summer.

Morgan’s Inspiration Island is an extension of Morgan’s Wonderland, a theme park built to be inclusive for all its guests, including kids with disabilities. Like Wonderland, all parts of the Inspiration Island water park are wheelchair-accessible. Guests with special needs are also admitted at no cost.

Morgan’s Inspiration Island, a splash park, was designed with kids in disabilities in mind.

Morgan’s Wonderland and Inspiration Island are the creations of Gordon and Maggie Hartman, a couple whose daughter has physical and cognitive challenges.

“We decided to call it Morgan’s Inspiration Island because Morgan truly has been the catalyst for every project we’ve pursued to help the special-needs community,” Gordon said in a press release.

The team behind…

Facebook Live Videos Can Now Be Accessed by 360 Million Disabled People

Thanks to a progressive move announced by Facebook last week, video content has now been made available to over 360 million people worldwide.

That’s because the social media giant has just made it so that Facebook Live videos can now feature closed captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing, 30 million of which live in America alone.

Regular Facebook videos have been able to feature closed captioning since 2014, however with 20% of Facebook video content now being broadcasted through the live feature,…

How to Disable the Microphone on Your Netgear Arlo Pro Camera

The Arlo Pro camera not only records video when it detects motion, but it can also capture audio as well. However, if that’s not a feature that you’ll really take advantage of, here’s how to disable the microphone to save just a tad bit of battery life.

Open up the Arlo app and tap on the “Settings” tab in the bottom-right corner.

Tap on “My Devices” at the top.

Select your camera from the list if you…

Mother Who Refused to Give Up Disabled Son Nurtures Him All the Way to Harvard

Despite being told he would never succeed because of his disabilities, this 29-year-old Chinese man defied all of the odds thanks to his devoted mother.

Because of complications at birth, Ding Ding was born with cerebral palsy. Doctors advised his mother, Zou Hongyan, to give up the infant because he would never be as smart or capable as other children. Even her husband agreed with the doctors, saying that it wasn’t worth keeping a disabled son.

Zou remained defiant. She insisted on keeping Ding and divorced her husband soon after the birth, taking on…

How to Disable OneDrive and Remove It From File Explorer on Windows 10

Windows 10 includes OneDrive, but if you’d rather not see it, there are several ways to disable OneDrive and remove it from File Explorer on Windows 10.

Home Users: Uninstall OneDrive Normally

Starting in Windows 10’s Creators Update, you can now easily uninstall OneDrive like you would any other desktop program. Only Windows 10 Home users should do this. If you’re using Windows 10 Professional, Enterprise, or Education, skip this step and use the below Group Policy Editor method instead.

Head to either Control Panel > Programs > Uninstall a Program or Settings > Apps > Apps & features. You’ll see a “Microsoft OneDrive” program appear in the list of installed software. Click it and click the “Uninstall” button.

Windows will immediately uninstall OneDrive, and the OneDrive icon will disappear from the notification area.

(If you ever want to reinstall OneDrive in the future, you’ll need to run the OneDrive installer buried in the Windows system folder. Just head to the C:\Windows\SysWOW64\ folder on a 64-bit version of Windows 10 or the C:\Windows\System32 folder on a 32-bit version of Windows 10. Double-click the “OneDriveSetup.exe” file here and Windows will reinstall OneDrive.)

There’s one problem with uninstalling OneDrive this way: The empty OneDrive folder will still appear in File Explorer’s sidebar. If you’re fine with that, you can stop now. OneDrive has been removed and is no longer doing anything. However, if the empty OneDrive folder bothers you, you’ll need to use the below tricks.

Home Users: Remove the OneDrive Folder From File Explorer by Editing the Registry

If you have Windows 10 Home, you will have to edit the Windows Registry to remove the OneDrive folder from the File Explorer’s left sidebar. You can also do it this way on Windows Pro or Enterprise, but the Group Policy Editor method is a better solution for cleanly disabling OneDrive.

Standard warning: Registry Editor is a powerful tool and misusing it can render your system unstable or even inoperable. This is a pretty simple hack and as long as you stick to the instructions, you shouldn’t have any problems. That said, if you’ve never worked with it before, consider reading about how to use the Registry Editor before you get started. And definitely back up the Registry (and your computer!) before making changes.

To get started, open the Registry Editor by hitting Start and typing “regedit”. Press Enter to open Registry Editor and give it permission to make changes to your PC.

In the Registry Editor, use the left sidebar to navigate to the following key. In the Creators Update, you can…

How to Make Maps and Graphs Colorblind People Can Actually Read

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Good design is design that can serve all users, regardless of their differences. It is sometimes difficult, however, for designers to remember or imagine that some physical, mental, or environmental conditions may prevent individuals from using a product the way it was intended.

Think about maps, for example. Cartographers rely on colors and symbols as ways to relay information efficiently. However, people who have color-vision deficiencies may not be able to discern between the colors outlining separate geographical areas, which will render the map useless to them. But it’s not just maps, many everyday objects can prove difficult for color-blind people, from traffic lights to pairing the same color socks.

Color blindness, which is not a form of blindness but a deficiency that affects the perception of color, is relatively common. The red-green type, which makes it difficult for individuals to distinguish between shades of red, yellow, and green, is the most prevalent affecting about 1 in 12 males and 1 in 200 females. It is inherited through a gene on the X chromosome, which is why in women, a defect in one X chromosome can be compensated for by the other. Other forms of color deficiency, like the blue-yellow presentation and blue cone monochromancy are much rarer.

Examples of test plates from the Ishihara test, which is used to diagnose red-green color deficiencies. On the left plate, the number “74” should be clearly visible to viewers with normal color vision, while viewers with some color deficiencies may read it as “21”, or may see nothing. On the right plate, viewers with normal color vision should see nothing, while red-green deficiency sees 2. Credit: Wikimedia Commons

So, what can designers and developers do to make their products…

7 Ways Makers Are Increasing the Care in Health Care

What if hospitals had in-house makerspaces so that doctors and nurses could modify off-the-shelf medical supplies for increased patient comfort? That would be amazing. What happens when makers collaborate with disabled people to design accessible, low-cost medical devices? Innovation. Increasingly, makers are lending their skill sets toward amping up the care in health care. For instance, MakerHealth is not only leading the charge in helping to create makerspaces in hospitals, but they’re also building a powerful network of health care providers sharing how-tos. And with maker-made innovations like the mouth-controlled input device that enables people with little or no hand movement to operate a touchscreen device, the future of health care is looking brighter every day. Read on to learn more about seven powerful ways makers are helping people live fuller lives. Then come on out to the 12th annual Maker Faire Bay Area, May 19–21, to meet these makers and get inspired.

Makers Making Change

B.C. Canada’s Makers Making Change connects makers to people with disabilities who need assistive technologies. Together they co-create access solutions. Makers Making Change offers a repository of open-source assistive technologies, and in January of this year, they held a 48-hour Access Makeathon, where each person with a disability was linked up with a team of makers who built an open-source solution that directly addressed a need of the person they were paired with. Makers got the chance to apply their skills to address a real-world and each disabled person left the event with a working prototype that improved their quality of life. One of their featured projects is called LipSync, a mouth-controlled input device that enables people with little or no hand movement to operate a touchscreen device.

LipSync is open source, affordable, 3D-printable, Arduino-based, Bluetooth-enabled, and wheelchair-mountable. It can be built in a weekend, employs easy-to-source hardware, and costs around $300 instead of $1,500 (for the off-the-shelf equivalent).

From their site:

The Lipsync is a mouth-operated joystick that allows a person to control a computer cursor with a minimum of head and neck movement. All the electronics are housed in the ‘head’ of the device so there are no additional control boxes, making the LipSync a good candidate for portable, wheelchair-mounted applications. The mouthpiece is attached to a precision miniature joystick sensor that requires only a very slight pressure on the shaft in order to move a cursor on the screen. The mouthpiece is hollow and allows a person to perform left and right mouse button clicks by alternatively puffing or sipping into the tube.

An estimated 1,000,000 people in Canada and the United States have limited or no use of their arms, meaning they are unable to use touchscreen devices that could provide access to helpful apps and services. While solutions exist for desktop computers, they can cost up to $3,000 and do not work well on mobile devices.

On Saturday, May 20, Makers Making Change cofounder Chad Leaman will be speaking in Expo Hall on the Make: Live Stage at 4:15 p.m.

Here’s Leaman demonstrating how LipSync works:

MakerHealth

Born out of MIT’s Little Devices Lab in 2008, MakerHealth originally began as part of an approach to reinvent the way MIT students were taught medical device design. The founders observed health care professionals around the globe creating their own modified solutions, and they recognized the potential positive impact of training these folks on the front line to go from from providers to prototypers. After all, these are the people who are most in touch with the direct needs of patients, many of whom are not served by off-the-shelf generic solutions. In a nutshell, Maker Health is out to revolutionize health care. They put it best, in their description that makes you want to jump up and say, “Let’s do this!”:

We believe everyone can be a medical maker. In a world where health care technology is increasingly black boxed and unaffordable, we found a stealth community of innovators working around the clock to make health better, by making their own devices to make us better. These are the health makers, the tinkerers and the explorers that inspire our team to create instruments, to rewrite medical education, and to build the invention infrastructure in hospitals around the world. Whether it’s a prototyping kit part of tomorrow’s doctor’s bag, or a MakerHealth Space laboratory dreaming up a prototype prescription, our global team is passionate about democratizing your ability to create and invent the things you can hold in your hand. These are the things that heal. And the things that our team is making sure you can make. We’re MakerHealth and you are a health maker.

Among their offerings is helping to start makerspaces in hospitals. The very first one of its kind is at…