Eating

You Don’t Need An Extreme Weight Loss Diet, You Need Healthy Eating!

The weight loss industry is trending more than ever before. With the fact that over 66% of American adults are overweight and many of them considered as obese, it is no wonder that people are always looking for ways to lose weight.1 One particular problem that many people face is the fact that they want to lose as much weight as possible so that they can regain their confidence, look good and feel better about themselves. Unfortunately, rapid and extreme weight loss is not beneficial for the human body and can actually lead to many adverse effects, which, in some cases, could even be fatal to a person’s overall health. In this post, we’d like to focus on the dangers of an extreme weight loss diet, why you should avoid it and what you should do instead.2

How dangerous can extreme weight loss be?

There are numerous types of extreme and rapid weight loss diets out there. Each of them will give you a set of instructions to follow, and many of them will have their own unique “technique” to help you shed pounds quickly and rapidly. These programs often combine a calorie restrict diet with a series of effective weight loss exercises – the exercises are not the problem in the case of an extreme weight loss diet, but rather the idea of restricting your food intake to a point where your body is not obtaining the nutrition it needs to function properly.3

Food Talk explains that rapid weight loss can put a person at a higher risk of experiencing gout attacks, bladder pain and also lead to a lack of energy.4 When energy levels become low due to the restricted diet you are following, then you will not be able to participate in an adequate level of physical activity, including both cardio and strength training exercises, to ensure your muscles are kept strong.

Furthermore, such a diet can cause a deficiency in essential minerals and vitamins, also known as malnutrition. Malnutrition is a dangerous condition that can cause…

Edible Innovations: Dr. Wichelecki Makes Good Sugar

From Singapore to the USA and all around Europe, Edible Innovations profiles food makers that engage in improving the global food system at every stage, from production to distribution to eating and shopping. Join us as we explore the main trends in the industry from a maker perspective. Chiara Cecchini of Food Innovation Program — an ecosystem with a strong educational core that promotes food innovation as a key tool to tackle the great challenges of the future — introduces you to the faces, stories, and experiences of food makers around the globe. Check back on Tuesdays and Thursdays for new installments.

In the United States there are over 29 million people who live with diabetes. Globally there are over 371 million people affected. With the numbers rising for both Type 2 Diabetes and obesity rates worldwide, scientists have begun looking to what people are consuming for the answers to these statistics.

These health issues can be traced back to excessively consuming sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). These two types of sugars have been harshly judged in the media before, and even publicly linked to some serious side effects. This resulted in fad dieting and quite a few individuals deciding to cut sugar from their diets entirely. However, internationally, people still crave the sugars that they are used to eating and cooking with.

Huge amounts of products are distributed and sold daily with sucrose and other sweeteners, and they are almost all very addictive. However, sucrose is not our only option. There are better products for us to consume. Dr. Daniel Wichelecki aims to provide the world with a sugar that is both higher quality and more affordable in comparison to sucrose.

Meatless Protein: Top 10 High Protein Vegan Foods For All The Vegan Gym People!

It’s very hard to be a vegan athlete: Not only do they have to plan their meals more carefully than their meat-eating counterparts, but they are also frequently subject to intense skepticism and scrutiny from the athletic community at large. You can’t gain muscle if you don’t eat meat. There’s no way you’re getting enough protein to accommodate your workout schedule.

Do any of these statements or questions sound familiar?

If you’ve been a vegan athlete for more than, say, a week, I’m betting the answer is “yes”.

These comments are annoying and misguided. Still, they do have a small grain of truth to them: If you’re working out regularly, then it’s vital to consume plenty of protein on a regular basis. That’s because protein provides our bodies with the fuel they need to power through workouts and recover after them.

Here’s what happens if athletes (whether vegan or carnivorous) don’t consume enough protein:

Your body will break down muscle instead of building it.

When you aren’t eating enough protein, your body needs to find fuel somewhere else—and if it gets desperate enough, it will start “feeding” on your own tissues in order to do so. More specifically, the body will start to tear down muscle tissue1 in order to obtain the amino acids that are necessary for sustaining the function of your organs. Obviously, the loss of muscle mass is the last thing any athlete wants.

It will take longer to recover from injuries.

Our bodies require protein2 in order to repair damaged cells, skin, and tissues. When we’re not consuming enough protein, our bodies won’t recover from injuries as quickly, and we’ll suffer from decreased immunity overall. This can be a major setback for anyone attempting to follow a rigorous training plan.

You’ll feel tired all the time.

If you’re not getting enough protein—especially as an athlete—then you’re liable to suffer from chronic fatigue3 or a general sense of sluggishness. This can seriously impair your workout routine, because you’re less likely to show up for your workouts or power through intense workouts if you’re constantly feeling tired.

So it is true that protein should play a major role in athletes’ diets. But it certainly is not true that it’s impossible for vegans to eat a high-protein diet. We’ll prove it in the following section.

High-Protein Foods for Vegan Athletes

There is a huge variety of vegan foods that are packed with protein. Below, we’ve highlighted 10 of the best.

These teeny tiny little seeds are known as a superfood for a reason: They pack four grams of protein into just two tablespoons, and they also boast plenty of other nutrients in the form of calcium, fiber, iron, magnesium, zinc, and omega-3 fatty acids. Chia seeds can be added raw to a variety of dishes, from smoothies to oatmeal or yogurt parfaits. Give them a try in this recipe for Chia Vegan Protein Muffins.

Young soybeans (aka edamame) boast 11 grams of complete protein per half cup, which makes them a stellar source of protein. They’re…

You Won’t Believe How Easy Meal Prep Could Be! And how Much Money It Can Help You Save!

Dealing with getting lunch at work can be a real downer. If you don’t plan ahead, you’ll be stuck with the often unhealthy and unnaturally large portions available at fast food joints and other restaurants.

If you’re trying to eat healthy, you’ll find limited options, and expensive ones at that.Leave your days of $12 salads behind by doing meal prep in advance so you can bring your own healthy — and delicious — lunch to work every day.

How to Meal Prep Like a Pro

The key to getting started with meal prepping is to not try to do too much too fast. If you’re accustomed to never packing a lunch, start with prepping a couple of days a week. Once it becomes a habit you can work on packing lunches every day.

Think about what kinds of foods you like to eat that can be eaten cold or easily reheated. Because we’re talking healthy lunches, think about salads, soups, grain dishes, beans, sandwiches and wraps. We’ve got 10 great recipes to get you started below, but you’ll definitely do better sticking to your healthy lunch plan if you’re making things you like.

Another great idea is to choose items that will freeze well. Many soups, grains and beans do well in the freezer, so you can make a big batch and freeze it in lunch-sized portions to be pulled out in future weeks. Score!

Check your kitchen for supplies you can repurpose to help with your meal prep. You’ll need small plastic or glass food storage containers (Mason jars are excellent for this purpose). You may also want a bento box or divided lunch box if your meal will consist of multiple items. They’re also adorable.

Prepping once for the whole week of healthy lunches is a great habit to get into, and a great way to spend your Sunday afternoon or evening. But be aware of food safety and don’t keep foods for too long after you prepare them.

How long can you keep your food?

Salads will be best in the day or two after you make them. Meat can hold in the fridge for three or four days. Vegetarian items can go longer, and things that have been kept in the freezer are good for at least six months in cold storage and for a few days after thawing.

Here are some great starter recipes to get you excited about meal prep and healthy eating.

Maybe the classic meal prep lunch is the Mason jar salad. There’s a good reason for that: they are cute, easy to make and you can make a great variety of salads, both with greens and with pasta, by following this same basic structure.

Organize Yourself Skinny has the lowdown on what makes a Mason jar salad work — basically, you put the dressing on the bottom, then some hard-vegetable barrier between the dressing and the greens or pasta — and links to more than a dozen ideas you can make yourself.

Her Greek Mason jar salad, pictured above, calls for chicken but you could also sub chickpeas to make it vegetarian and to save money, though either way these salads are only a couple of bucks a serving.

Homemade Instant Noodles

Ramen is a meal you might have left behind in your poor college student days (or not), but you can give that classic broke food a serious and healthy upgrade with the tips from Serious Eats.

This homemade instant noodle…

Edible Innovations: Steven and the Californian Baking Movement

From Singapore to the USA and all around Europe, Edible Innovations profiles food makers that engage in improving the global food system at every stage, from production to distribution to eating and shopping. Join us as we explore the main trends in the industry from a maker perspective. Chiara Cecchini of Food Innovation Program — an ecosystem with a strong educational core that promotes food innovation as a key tool to tackle the great challenges of the future — introduces you to the faces, stories, and experiences of food makers around the globe. Check back on Tuesdays and Thursdays for new installments.

This is a crazy story of disruption — a disruption that has now been ongoing for more than 30 years.

Steven and Susie Sullivan founded The Acme Bread Company in 1983 to bake bread for restaurants and stores that wanted to offer better bread than was generally available on the wholesale market at the time. They saw a lack of good bread on a larger scale. “Good bakeries were small ones that were not able to serve restaurants “ says Steven, “that’s why everything started.”

Steven started working at Chez Panisse in Berkeley, along with Alice Waters (@AliceWaters). There wasn’t a big food movement going on at the time and “Silicon Valley” was still just known as the “Bay Area.” He was 18 the first time he went…

10 Best Paleo Snacks Recipes That You Need To Try Making At Home

Heard of the paleo diet but wondering what in the world does it mean? Well, the paleo comes from the Paleolithic era, aka when man was still a hunter-gatherer – what the early man ate, is basically what constitutes the paleo diet, also called the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet, for apt reasons.

The Difference between Paleo Diet And Ordinary Diet

Think back to the early times of man – other than needing to run away from predators and dying of things as simple as the common cold, the paleo man (and woman, for that matter) didn’t have access to grains, salt, processed foods, colas, junk food, chocolates, tea or coffee. What he did have access to, or hunted and foraged for were fruits, vegetable (free range) meat, poultry and eggs, sea food and as well as nuts and seeds.

Wild cereals were sometimes foraged for, but a find was few and far between so cereal was also not a big part of the Paleolithic diet at all. Recent evidence proves that wine, however was, for some time in the Paleolithic era, man learnt to ferment grape juice in animal skin pouches. 1

The Benefits of Following Paleo Diet

At first glance, the paleo diet seems pretty doable – it’s a clean diet that emphasizes eating fresh, from the source and without any additional additives, preservatives or chemicals and it does help you stay fuller for longer as well as lose weight because of limited food choices. 2This diet also raises your iron levels and helps you get plenty more phytonutrients from all the plant-based foods you consume.

The downside of the paleo diet is that the absence of grains and cereal can lower your energy levels and it is also a tad expensive. If you are on a paleo diet, you also have to maintain a certain amount of physical activity; which ironically becomes difficult to do simply because you are off carbs and may be low on energy in the first place!

The paleo diet philosophy is basically designed to improve a person’s health and athletic performance by taking in lean protein and high GI carbs via fruits and vegetables – the die does not lack in nutrients and can in fact raise your vitamin and mineral levels to an optimum amounts, plus give you plenty antioxidants and phytonutrients as well. Paleo snacks comprise of lean meats or protein, healthy amounts of dairy, healthy fats in the form of nuts and seeds and as many fruits and veggies you can eat! Healthy, tasty, filling and low in calories – paleo snacks make for great tidbits, even if you are not on a paleo diet! 3

Five Savory Paleo Snacks

Crispy Brussel Sprout Chips

A vitamin rich snack that’s nutritious, tasty and filling, Crispy Brussels Sprouts 4 will please your palate and stomach in just about 50 calories.

You need: 10 Brussels sprouts, 1 tablespoon olive oil and 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

To make it:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. With a paring knife, cut off the bottom tip of each sprout. The outer leaves will fall off.
  3. Trim a tiny bit more off the bottom so more leaves fall off. Continue until you’ve removed all the leaves.
  4. Toss the leaves with the oil, and lay them in one layer on a rimmed baking sheet.
  5. Sprinkle with salt.
  6. Roast seven to 10 minutes, until leaves are lightly browned and crisp.

Who says snacks have to be bland? Healthy pumpkin seeds 5 with real jalapenos with olive oil and seasonings are as healthy as they are delicious.

You need: 1 1/2 cups pumpkin seeds, cleaned & dried; 3 jalapeño peppers, sliced; 3 tablespoons olive oil and sea salt and paprika, to taste

To make it:

  1. Remove the seeds from the pumpkin and sort the guts out.
  2. Rinse the seeds pat dry and transfer to a rimmed baking sheet to dry overnight.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350°F and add olive oil and sea salt.
  4. Stir pumpkin seeds with your hands to combine.
  5. Lay slices of jalapeño peppers on top of seeds.
  6. Sprinkle paprika over the top of everything, generously.
  7. Bake for 10 minutes.
  8. Use a spatula to move the seeds and peppers around and bake for another 5 minutes.
  9. Move mixture around some more and bake for a final 5 minutes.
  10. Remove tray from oven and let everything rest for 15-30 minutes to let the jalapeño-ness soak into the seeds.
  11. Store in an airtight container, if you don’t finish them all in one sitting.

Have a craving for chips? Can do on a paleo diet with this crunchy, chip alternative 6 to Doritos, that uses no flour.

You need: 3/4 cup almond flour, 1/4 cup coconut flour, 1/4 cup flax seeds, 1/4 cup of butter (or ghee), 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1 1/2 teaspoon chili, 1/2 teaspoon cumin, 1/2 teaspoon paprika powder, 1 egg and 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

To make it:

  1. Melt the butter and basically…

Edible Innovations: Common Garden Develops Open Source Farming Techniques

From Singapore to the USA and all around Europe, Edible Innovations profiles food makers that engage in improving the global food system at every stage, from production to distribution to eating and shopping. Join us as we explore the main trends in the industry from a maker perspective. Chiara Cecchini of Food Innovation Program — an ecosystem with a strong educational core that promotes food innovation as a key tool to tackle the great challenges of the future — introduces you to the faces, stories, and experiences of food makers around the globe. Check back on Tuesdays and Thursdays for new installments.

Whether it is a balcony garden or an expansive farm, managing the many components of a garden can often be quite difficult. Agriculture is one of the few industries left that stubbornly refuses to upgrade their old systems and practices to incorporate 21st century technology and information. Jake Hartnell (@JakeHartnell) did not like that, so he decided to make a solution. Hartnell’s company, Common Garden (@Common_Garden), uses advanced technology to help farmers and growers alike get the perfect crop, every time.

So, who is the man behind the machine and its intricate software? Jake Hartnell is a designer and engineer from UC Berkeley and an affiliate with Berkeley’s Swarm Lab. He believes in developing technology that can be distributed and shared in a communal way. He is also a publisher who has written a science fiction novel and worked at hypothes.is.

All of these experiences would shape Hartnell’s future work at Common Garden. The environmental concerns that inspired future events in his novel needed to be addressed and his work at Berkeley taught him the importance of open source technology.

Both the…

A Study of Anorexics and Bulimics 22 Years Later Offers New Hope

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The full-recovery statistics on eating disorders in women have been bleak, with research suggesting that fewer than half the women with anorexia or bulimia ever recover fully. As a result, treatment for those who continue to suffer after 10 years generally shift to providing palliative care, since there seems so little hope for a cure beyond that time interval. Until now.

A new study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry that followed women with eating disorders for a longer period, found that by 22 years since the onset of an eating disorder nearly two-thirds of women do fully recover. It may be that previous studies simply may not have been anorexia and bulimia victims long enough to see this. That 10-year victims previously viewed as hopeless still have a reason to keep working toward recovery is big news.

suffering

Anorexia and bulimia are brutal — anorexia is statistically more deadly than any other mental disorder. Driven by a distorted body image and a terror of gaining weight, anorexia sufferers starve themselves while bulimics embark on a dangerous cycle of binge-eating and purging. Both are damaging to the body, leading to a host of problems, including infertility and even heart failure.

danger

The study was led by Kamryn Eddy of Massachusetts General Hospital. It followed 246 women who’d volunteered for the study between 1987 and…

Edible Innovations: Raising Awareness About Ethical Seafood with Fishpeople

From Singapore to the USA and all around Europe, Edible Innovations profiles food makers that engage in improving the global food system at every stage, from production to distribution to eating and shopping. Join us as we explore the main trends in the industry from a maker perspective. Chiara Cecchini of Food Innovation Program — an ecosystem with a strong educational core that promotes food innovation as a key tool to tackle the great challenges of the future — introduces you to the faces, stories, and experiences of food makers around the globe. Check back on Tuesdays and Thursdays for new installments.

Loaded with lean proteins and stocked with omega-3 fatty acids for both your brain and body, fish and seafood act as an excellent source of beneficial nutrients. However, parts of the seafood industry is shrouded in mystery and unethical practices. It is not always mandatory to disclaim where or how seafood is caught, and this can make consumers think twice about purchasing it.

Within the last five years, documentaries about the disreputable capture of seafood have taken center stage and racked up quite a few awards. A desire for sustainably sourced seafood is now almost as popular among the average consumer, as it is around foodies.

However, healthy protein can be difficult to cook and season, as it is not usually a part of our weekly menu. Without practice, cooking seafood just the right way, and then flavoring it so that it is both tasty and healthy can be a challenge. Ken Plasse (@kplasse), CEO of Fishpeople (@fishpeoples), strives to bring further awareness to both ethical fishing practices and cooking and handling seafood. Fishpeople wants to make all your fish meals both delicious and responsible.

Ken joined up with Fishpeople in 2015, with over fifteen years of executive experience focused on new and leading consumer products. He wanted to create a brand that the customer could both trust and love. Not only would Fishpeople be a household name for sustainably caught seafood,…

If You Want To Lose Weight, Do It In The Right Way

With a growing number of people in the world struggling with to lose weight, it’s no wonder there are so many fad diets being promoted through mainstream media.

According to the WHO, around 52% of the world’s population is either overweight or obese.1 Many of these people have tried to lose weight at least at some point in their lives, and some have even experimented with extreme dieting by following fad diets.

But as research shows, an extreme weight loss diet is not only ineffective as a long-term solution, but it can be extremely damaging to your health.

Extreme dieting leads to muscle wasting

Extreme weight loss diets usually involve severe calorie restriction with the goal of shedding a great amount of weight in the shortest amount of time possible. While these diets will inevitably lead to great weight loss within the first few weeks, you need to keep in mind that you run the risk of losing muscle tissue before you get the chance to shed fat.

According to medical experts, extreme dieting will first lead to water weight loss, then to muscle atrophy, and at the very last stage, to fat loss. Researcher G.L. Thorpe has explained this a very long time ago stating that our body does not selectively burn fat when we eat less.2 It rather, wastes all body tissue, including the muscles and bones.

Muscle wasting slows down your metabolism

The reason why your body targets muscle tissue first when you are starving yourself is because it aims to preserve energy when food is sparse. To explain this further – your body needs more energy in order to maintain muscle tissue than it does in order to maintain fat.

When there’s a shortage of energy from food as in cases of extreme dieting, your body will attempt to remove one of the body’s greatest energy consumers – the muscles.

This will happen even if you do weight-loss exercises that you may think help build more muscle. But the bad news does not end there.3

Keep in mind that a loss of muscle mass leads to a lower basal metabolic rate, and a lower metabolic rate leads to, you’ve guessed it – more weight gain. These facts explain why so many people experience the jo-jo effect following an extreme diet.

A study published in The Journals of Gerontology found that calorie restriction reduces energy expenditure.4