Gender

How to Always Be Listened to and Understood

it can be challenging to put my phone away when I’m spending time with friends. We all know how addicting social media can be, but it doesn’t make it any less rude to the person sitting across from me telling me about a problem they’re facing. Even saying, “I’m just replying to this email, but I swear I’m listening,” is a barrier to effective communication.

There have been times when, even without my phone, I realize I’m only half-listening to someone. It’s a distracting world, and sometimes it can be hard to compartmentalize all the things on your mental to-do list and just be present. But, that doesn’t justify listening with one ear. Is sending a perfectly timed gif as a response to a text really worth losing a friendship over? Yeah, I didn’t think so.

Everyone talks, but very few of us listen to understand.

An inability to fully grasp what someone is telling us hinders productive and successful communication even when we’re paying attention. Aside from all the distractions and confusion the world, in general, presents us with, we still have differences that make it challenging to hear someone and understand them.

In today’s world, it’s more important than ever to work with someone to understand their point of view. It doesn’t mean we have to agree, but we should give the same respect we want when seeking a meaningful discussion. With more arguments than ever over gender and culture, how do we improve ourselves?

Voicing an opinion can sometimes feel like walking on eggshells. You don’t want to risk losing a friendship or relationship because you couldn’t see eye-to-eye, but knowing what barriers you may inadvertently be creating is important.

These are the six most common barriers we face in communication:

Even if you are the ideal friend, when it comes to leaving your phone behind and being fully present when someone needs you, you’re not immune to communication barriers. I don’t just mean the common language barrier though it’s certainly a valid one. In fact, there is a whole list of barriers that prevent us from communicating concisely. The following is a list of 6 barriers we should all make a point to focus on for effective communication:

Perceptual barriers: different viewpoints, bias and stereotypes

Perceptual barriers are internal. If you go into a situation thinking the person you are talking to isn’t going to understand or take interest in what you have to say, you may end up subconsciously sabotaging your effort to make your point. You will employ language that is sarcastic, dismissive, or even obtuse, thereby alienating your conversational partner.1

Attitudinal barriers: lack of interest or relevance

Attitudinal barriers to communication may result from personality conflicts, poor management, resistance to change, or a lack of motivation. Effective receivers of messages should attempt to overcome their own attitudinal barriers to facilitate effective communication.2

Attitudes are usually formed by an individual’s opinion and can be difficult to change. When this barrier overrides the focus on professionalism in the workplace, it can be next to impossible to work together.

This barrier is not an easy one to break down. It’s important to be aware of your attitude, and try to understand the root of it. It will be a slow-going process, but allowing yourself to change your attitude will be worth it in the end.

Language barriers: jargon and word choice

Even when communicating in the same language, the terminology used may act as a barrier if not fully understood by the receiver. For example, a message that includes a lot of specialist jargon and abbreviations will not be understood by a receiver who is not familiar with the terminology used.

Aim to translate all relevent documents, use an…

Why using AI in policing decisions risks racial bias

Karma police?
Karma police?

AI is rocking the world of policing — and the consequences are still unclear.

British police are poised to go live with a predictive artificial intelligence system that will help officers assess the risk of suspects re-offending.

It’s not Minority Report (yet) but certainly sounds scary. Just like the evil AIs in the movies, this tool has an acronym: HART, which stands for Harm Assessment Risk Tool, and it’s going live in Durham after a long trial.

The system, which classifies suspects at a low, medium, or high risk of committing a future offence, was tested in 2013 using data that Durham police gathered from 2008 to 2012.

Its results are mixed.

Forecasts that a suspect was low risk turned out to be accurate 98 percent of the time, while forecasts that they were high risk were accurate 88 percent of the time.

That’s because the tool was designed to be very, very cautious and is likely to assign someone as medium or high risk to avoid releasing suspects who may commit a crime.

A self-learning system

According to Sheena Urwin, head of criminal justice at Durham Constabulary, during the testing HART didn’t impact officers’ decisions and, when live, it will “support officers’ decision making” rather than define it.

Urwin also explained to the BBC that suspects with no offending history would be less likely to be classed as high risk — unless they were arrested for serious crimes.

Police could use HART to decide whether to keep a suspect in custody for more time, release them on bail before charge or whether to remand them in custody.

However, privacy and advocacy groups have expressed fears that the algorithm could replicate and amplify inherent biases around race, class, or gender.

“This can be hard to detect, particularly in self-learning systems, which carry greater risks,” Jim Killock, Executive Director of Open Rights Group, told Mashable.

“While…

Androgynous Model Poses As Both Man And Woman To Challenge Gender Stereotypes

Meet Rain Dove – the androgynous model that walks the runway in both menswear and womenswear.

Though Rain didn’t always see herself as androgynous. Instead, she saw herself as an “ugly women”. “I never had bad feelings about it, I just felt that maybe I was that one girl,” Dove told After Ellen. “It wasn’t until I was wilderness firefighter for a while and that’s when I felt more empowered in my ambiguity and sexuality as far as gender presentation goes.”

Quite frequently, people assume Rain is male, but she doesn’t correct them. Instead, Rain takes advantage of these “misunderstandings”. “When I was a firefighter they thought I was a male and I went with it because I really need a job and I was out in the middle of nowhere in Colorado,” she said. “So I utilized my gender bending profile as something that had gotten me a bunch of odd jobs from nannying to landscape.” And that’s when it all started… Now, Rain Dove is an activist, she is pursuing acting, and she is the model that turns heads on the runway in both menswear and womenswear. “We’re all struggling to be unique and the most unique thing…

Why Men Don’t Make More Than Women Infographic

Why women actually don't make less than men

The claim that women make 77 cents to every dollar men make disregards many choices women make, leading to false claims on social inequality and skewing gender debates.

It’s true, but only if you don’t account for occupations, positions, education, job tenure and hours worked per week which lower the wage gap to about a nickel.

What’s really going on then?

Expectations and sex-based stereotypes push men towards STEM careers (Science Technology Engineering math) and women towards “pink-collar” health and education jobs. The real wage gap is expanded by common choices by gender, like what college major you choose. Males overwhelmingly choose higher paying majors, females lower paying majors. This is abased not…