Health

When You Lie, Your Brain Is Actually Suffering

Ever hear this: “Don’t lie, your nose will grow!” or “Liar, liar, pants on fire!”? One of the basic lessons of our childhood was to never tell a lie. We all know we shouldn’t lie, yet we seem to do it anyway. In fact, you’ve probably already lied today. Shaking your head “no”? Could be another lie. Research shows that most people tell 1 to 2 lies a day!1

We always make excuses for our lies, too. “It’s not pathological lying, it’s a simple white lie.” “I said it so I wouldn’t hurt their feelings.” “I didn’t want to get in trouble.” So, what’s the big deal if everybody else is doing it? Well, as it turns out, lying could be affecting your brain and body.

When you lie, your brain is overwhelmed

Lots of research has been conducted about the health effects of pathological lying and guess what? It could be detrimental to your health.

According to Arthur Markman, Ph.D., the very second that lie leaves your lips, your body releases cortisol into your brain. Just a few minutes later and your memory goes into overdrive trying to remember both the lie and the truth. Decision making becomes more difficult and you could even project your discomfort as anger. This is all in the first 10 minutes!2

When you lie, your stress increases

After these initial reactions, you may start to feel worried about your lie – or about being caught lying. To deal with this feeling, you might try to make up for the lie…

Pregnancy Craving: Why Do Pregnant Women Crave Pickles and Other Kinds of Food?

Weird pregnancy cravings: the source of thousands of jokes and many late-night trips to the grocery store. The most stereotypical pregnancy craving is pickles and ice cream, but pregnant women have reported craving just about any kind of food you can think of. Around half of pregnant women in the U.S. have at least one craving, which can be as standard as the pickles and ice cream cliché, or as strange as eggplant or Cheese Whiz sandwiches. Other foods become repulsive to moms-to-be—sometimes food they loved before pregnancy.

Why do pregnant women crave pickles and other kinds of food?

These cravings and aversions occur for a specific reason—the influx of hormones can cause both biological and neurobiological imbalances. Pregnancy hormones impact a woman’s senses of taste and smell, which can cause major shifts in what she wants to eat. Some scientists also believe that some food cravings can indicate a deficiency in certain vitamins and minerals. The bottom line though? It’s not totally clear why women have cravings and aversions during pregnancy.

Although many women give into their cravings with no problems, food cravings can become severe, causing problems during pregnancy. In these cases, neurocounseling can be effective for reducing or eliminating cravings.

Incorporate cravings into a pregnancy diet for healthy fetal development

Interestingly, some experts have noticed that cravings often change during different stages of pregnancy. For example, many women start becoming hypersensitive to bitterness during the first two trimesters—possibly to prevent the consumption of harmful substances during fetal development.

It’s important to incorporate cravings into a pregnancy diet, since they can be an indication of what the mother or baby needs for healthy development. The catch is that many of these cravings consist of junk food, which should be limited during pregnancy. Too much junk food won’t help the baby’s development, and may cause excess weight gain. Balancing unhealthy cravings with a healthy diet (and healthy cravings) is key for a healthy pregnancy.

Coming up with alternatives for unhealthy cravings is…

You Don’t Need An Extreme Weight Loss Diet, You Need Healthy Eating!

The weight loss industry is trending more than ever before. With the fact that over 66% of American adults are overweight and many of them considered as obese, it is no wonder that people are always looking for ways to lose weight.1 One particular problem that many people face is the fact that they want to lose as much weight as possible so that they can regain their confidence, look good and feel better about themselves. Unfortunately, rapid and extreme weight loss is not beneficial for the human body and can actually lead to many adverse effects, which, in some cases, could even be fatal to a person’s overall health. In this post, we’d like to focus on the dangers of an extreme weight loss diet, why you should avoid it and what you should do instead.2

How dangerous can extreme weight loss be?

There are numerous types of extreme and rapid weight loss diets out there. Each of them will give you a set of instructions to follow, and many of them will have their own unique “technique” to help you shed pounds quickly and rapidly. These programs often combine a calorie restrict diet with a series of effective weight loss exercises – the exercises are not the problem in the case of an extreme weight loss diet, but rather the idea of restricting your food intake to a point where your body is not obtaining the nutrition it needs to function properly.3

Food Talk explains that rapid weight loss can put a person at a higher risk of experiencing gout attacks, bladder pain and also lead to a lack of energy.4 When energy levels become low due to the restricted diet you are following, then you will not be able to participate in an adequate level of physical activity, including both cardio and strength training exercises, to ensure your muscles are kept strong.

Furthermore, such a diet can cause a deficiency in essential minerals and vitamins, also known as malnutrition. Malnutrition is a dangerous condition that can cause…

When Women Started Growing Out and Painting Their Nails

long-finger-nails

On humans and other primates, nails are a flattened version of a claw which likely developed to aid in gripping and climbing. However, they can also act as a visible “health report.” Someone in poor health, or infected by a fungus, might have yellow, brittle nails, while someone in good health might have strong, long nails.

The fact that healthy nails are the sign of a healthy person may have led to people beginning to grow them out, or it could have been simply that long nails are cumbersome when working with your hands, so they were something of a status symbol. Whatever the case, it might surprise you to learn that manicuring nails has actually been around for many thousands of years—dating back at least to 3200 B.C. At the time, Chinese royalty would grow their nails and tint them with things like eggwhites or flower petals. Around the same time, Ancient Egyptians were also painting their nails, this time in accordance with their social classes; richer Egyptians painted their nails a darker colour, while poorer Egyptians painted them a lighter colour.

The modern practice of growing out and painting nails is a result of a more recent occurrence, happening in the 1920s and 1930s where women began growing long, luxurious nails. Before this, women commonly tinted their nails with oil or glosses. However, in the 1920s, shortly after the introduction and popularity of automobile paint, proper nail paint also became available and a nail painting boom resulted.

Of course, many “proper” women didn’t dare paint their nails for several decades after that, but Hollywood stepped in. In 1940, it became the style to have long, red nails, likely spurred on by actress Rita Hayworth. Many women started copying her style, striving to look like the knockout celebrity.

Much like painting one’s nails, artificial nails, which mimic real nails and add length and a healthy appearance to nails, have an astoundingly long history. Artificial nails were once worn by Chinese women during the Ming Dynasty (14th -17th century). In this case, these nail extensions were worn by noblewomen to further show that they did not have to use their hands for manual labour, unlike commoners. There are also records of women in 19th century Greece using pistachio shells as artificial nails.

It wasn’t until 1954 that an early version of the modern artificial nail was invented. It was first patented by Fred Slack, a dentist, who had chipped his nail at…

Where you live can affect your blood pressure, study suggests

Taking blood pressure
LOCATION LINK Moving from a highly segregated neighborhood to one with less segregation is associated with a decrease in systolic blood pressure among black adults, a new study finds.

For black adults, moving out of a racially segregated neighborhood is linked to a drop in blood pressure, according to a new study. The finding adds to growing evidence of an association between a lack of resources in many predominately black neighborhoods and adverse health conditions among their residents, such as diabetes and obesity.

Systolic blood pressure — the pressure in blood vessels when the heart beats — of black adults who left their highly segregated communities decreased just over 1 millimeter of mercury on average, researchers report online May 15 in JAMA Internal Medicine. This decline, though small, could reduce the overall incidence of heart failure and coronary heart disease.

“It’s the social conditions, not the segregation itself, that’s driving the relationship between segregation and blood pressure,” says Thomas LaVeist, a medical sociologist at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., who was not involved with the study. “Maybe hypertension is not so much a matter of being genetically predisposed.” That’s important, LaVeist adds, because it means that racial health disparity “can be fixed. It’s not necessarily contained in our DNA; it’s contained in the…

Nature connection: can technology help?

The team behind a new app hope to help Londoners enjoy nature in the city. Is using technology to encourage nature connection contradictory? Or can we ‘tap in’ to the natural world – and improve health and wellbeing at the same time?

A free community-based app has been launched by a group of Londoners who aim to put users “in closer contact with outdoor adventures on their doorstep”. Go Jauntly includes more than 7,000 minutes of walks in and around the capital, including routes through ancient cemeteries and some of London’s best-known public parks.

The NHS advises that regular walking can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, asthma, heart disease and stroke. Walking can also help improve work-life balance, particularly for time-pressured Londoners. Go Jauntly maps out well and less-known walks in the city, as well as routes in Kent and Suffolk. Through images and narrative, it guides people along both set and customisable routes.

“Our team is made up of nature-loving city dwellers who spend too much of our time deskbound and want to be a bit more active,” said Hana Sutch, CEO and co-founder of Go Jauntly. She had grown frustrated by the lack of easy-to-find walks in familiar places – from Richmond to Regent’s Park.

We’re creating technology for good that has a positive impact on society from health, wellness and environmental perspectives

Many believe that time in nature is a chance to leave the digital world behind. However, mobile technology is a powerful tool: one study by the Kaiser Family Foundation showed that children average more than seven hours a day on electronic devices. So should we use this resource to get everyone – from children to adults – outside, moving and learning about the natural world?

“We’re hoping that with Go Jauntly, we’re creating technology for good that has a positive impact on society from health, wellness and environmental perspectives,” said Sutch. “We wanted to start something that would get people out of the house and being more active.”

May is National Walking Month in the UK, an initiative run by Living Streets, a UK charity that promotes ‘everyday walking’. A NHS campaign is encouraging people to walk 10,000 steps each day – counting towards a recommended 150 minutes of exercise per week.

“I reconnected to nature through taking simple walks and noticing nature,” said Dr Miles Richardson from the University…

Improve The Efficiency Of Your Workout by Adding These 10+ Foods That Build Muscle

Exercise is most probably the best way to keep yourself fit and in good shape. However, what a lot of people actually don’t know is the fact that your eating and feeding pattern also has quite a lot to say about it. Very quickly, we’ll like to run down a few foods that increase the efficiency and results of your exercise regimen by contributing through muscle building .

Lean Beef

If you want to gain muscle mass, lean beef should be a regular in your diet. It is packed full of a lot of constituents, including zinc, iron and B-vitamins, all of which make a conducive environment for the growth of muscle mass. It also provides your body with high volumes of proteins and amino acids that stimulate muscle growth. If you’re trying to lose weight, you’ll be happy to know that a 3oz serving of lean beef has the ability to provide the same amount of protein as 1.5 cups of beans.

Chicken (but without the skins)

Just as it is with beef, chicken is also an amazing source of protein, which is important for the growth and repair of muscle tissues, the overall health of the bone and maintaining weight1 . All you have to do is go to a local grocery store and you’ll easily find chicken meat that is cut into single serving sizes and which can be quickly seasoned and processed.

Cottage Cheese

Although not many people are aware of this, but cottage cheese is actually almost completely full of casein protein. Casein is a protein that causes slow digestion, meaning it is just [perfect for building muscles. For people who have to go long periods without consuming food, cottage cheese is perfect. It is also an excellent source of…

I Promise These 10 Low GI foods can Keep You Fuller For Longer!

The glycemic index helps diabetics make smarter food choices, but it’s also a useful tool for everyone who wants to improve their health by eating low glycemic foods. In a nutshell, the theory behind the glycemic index is that certain types of food provide you with energy for a longer period of time. Meanwhile, other foods may feel filling at first, but they quickly lead to a sudden energy drop.

How Does the Glycemic Index Work?

Every food that contains carbohydrates can be rated on the glycemic index scale. Items that are low calorie, high in fiber and not overly processed score better because they are low glycemic foods. Scores range from 0 to 100, and this determines where each food fits on the glycemic index scale: 1

• Low Glycemic Foods – 0 to 55

• Medium Glycemic Foods – 56 to 69

• High Glycemic Foods – 70 or higher

Do I Need Low Glycemic Foods?

Do you experience an energy crash an hour or two after each meal? Or perhaps you find yourself sluggish at work after dining out with coworkers? Both of these issues can be caused by making unhealthy food choices.

If a large percentage of your calories are coming from high glycemic foods, you’re going to end up feeling very poorly. You’ll also get hungry more quickly. This is a vicious cycle because it causes you to keep increasing your calorie consumption, which leads to weight gain.

The reality is that everyone needs to eat a balanced diet, and sticking primarily with low glycemic foods is a major component of improving your health. It’s okay to eat medium or high glycemic foods from time-to-time, but the trick is to balance them as much as possible with vegetables and fruits from the low glycemic category.

What Are the Side Effects of a High Glycemic Diet?

After eating a lot of high glycemic foods, you’re likely to feel sluggish and run down. You may even feel ill if you’re not used to consuming poor quality calories. Doing this for too long can have an impact on your overall physical and mental health. In fact, studies have found that people who stick with a low glycemic index diet have a reduced risk of developing numerous medical conditions, including: 2

• Depression

• Type 2 diabetes

• Cardiovascular disease

• Breast, colon, pancreas and prostate cancer

• Gall stones

• Stroke

• Metabolic syndrome

• Chronic kidney disease

• Uterine fibroids

Diabetes: Managing the Risk

The most common issue that occurs from ingesting too many high glycemic foods is high blood sugar. Although this doesn’t automatically mean you have type 2 diabetes, it’s definitely a step toward developing this disease.

People who have diabetes face a long list of potential health complications, and they also typically have a lower quality of life. Due to this, it’s critical to do everything you can to reduce your diabetes risk. If you’re already diabetic, you can turn to low glycemic foods to help you manage your condition.

Making the switch to low glycemic foods will help you keep your weight down. Additionally, incorporating these healthier food choices will reduce your insulin levels and resistance. 3

Concentration and Memory Issues

Another big issue that can be caused by a lack of proper nutrients is impaired cognitive functionality. Many people feel fuzzy and have difficulty concentrating a couple of hours after eating a high glycemic meal.

To ensure a better level of brain function throughout the day, eat low glycemic foods along with some protein every 2-1/2 to 3 hours. 4 This will help balance your blood sugar and prevent the dips and peaks that accompany a…

Struggling with What to Eat Tonight? Here are 20 Quick and Healthy Dinner Recipes For You To Choose!

You are a corporate workhorse. Your boss loves you for that. Your paycheque says it all. Life, as you know it, is good.

Okay, let’s cut to the chase. The other side of the story is you always head home with a tired body, exhausted brain, and a hungry stomach. Some nights you would go straight to your favorite fast food joint and get what seems to be your perpetual go-to meal. The question is, are you sure you are eating real, healthy food and not artificial junk masquerading as one?

On other days, you try to muster up all the skills you need to prepare yourself a decent meal–using whatever’s left of your weekly supply. You’re lucky if you happen to have whole grain noodles, fresh tomatoes, and parmesan. Otherwise, grilled skinless chicken breasts would also make a nice, healthy treat. In both instances, you feel a quick sigh of relief, a refreshing break from your rather stale, unhealthy diet.

You don’t need to force yourself to eat food that only does your body more harm than good. It only takes a few minutes to whip up something that will not only satisfy your palate but will also boost your energy for the next day

Here are 20 quick and healthy dinner recipes you can enjoy all without breaking a sweat.

When you get both nutrition and gastronomic indulgence, you know it’s something you need to try. This easy marinara recipe makes use of fresh vegetables, ground sirloin, and jarred marinara sauce–no need to do the sauce from scratch! If you’re preparing a week-long meal plan, this recipe is recommended as it has a shelf life of five days and can be kept in mason jars.

  • Total prep and cook time: 30-35 minutes
  • Health factor: Ground sirloin is the leanest cut of meat–that’s fatless protein for you!

White beans have a mellow, blunt taste to them which means you can mix them in whatever sauce or broth you have. This tuna quesadilla recipe takes its taste from fresh cherry tomato pico, making it a savory meal you can have any time of the day.

  • Total prep and cook time: 25 minutes
  • Health factor: Beans are known to score low on the glycemic index. This helps reduce your risk of heart diseases and diabetes.

Can’t get enough of marinara? Partner it with coconut oil to make a succulent base for this super quick sardine meal.

  • Total prep and cook time: 1 minute
  • Health factor: Aside from tuna, sardines are known to be one of the highest sources of omega-3 fatty acids which lower chances of heart diseases

The lemon’s tangy taste cuts through the fresh, earthy texture of vegetables ultimately providing you with a satisfying multi-sensory experience.

  • Total prep and cook time: 20 minutes
  • Health factor: Keeping a high-fiber diet can help lower cholesterol levels and improve digestion.

This simple Hawaiian dish offers a nice balance between the melt-in-your-mouth goodness of fresh salmon and the creamy, smooth taste of avocado. Add to this the filling quality of rice and you’ll surely have a full meal, hook, line, and sinker.

  • Total prep and cook time: 20 minutes
  • Health factor: Avocados are very nutritious and contain a wide variety of vitamins and minerals as well as healthy fats.

A healthy and deliciously satisfying meal in a single sheet pan. This improved and simplified…

Why We Should Have More Vegetarian Protein and Where Can We Get It

Tell someone that you are a vegetarian and it is quite likely that the first thing you will be asked is, “But where do you get your protein?” A vegan friend of mine used to say that she felt as though she spent a significant part of her life explaining vegetarian protein1 to people.

Consuming the right amount of protein is important but how does plant-based protein compare to proteins derived from meat?

Animal Protein vs. Vegetarian Protein

When digested, protein is broken down into amino acids which are required for most metabolic processes. The main difference between animal protein and vegetarian protein is the types of amino acids that they contain.

Animal proteins are regarded as “complete” since they contain all of the essential amino acids. Vegetarian protein are sometimes viewed as being “incomplete” as some may lack one or more amino acid.2

However, there are various plants that are “complete” such as hemp seeds, quinoa, chlorella, and bee pollen. Furthermore, it is easy to combine different plant foods to have complete protein in your meals.

What are the Health Benefits of Vegetarian Protein

The good news is that you do not necessarily have to be a vegetarian to benefit from a plant-based diet! You can simply incorporate more vegetarian meals into your lifestyle. In fact, according to the American Dietetic Association, “appropriately-planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases.” 3

These are 5 health benefits of vegetarian protein:

  • You will lower your intake of cholesterol and unhealthy saturated fat which will lower the chances of heart disease.4
  • Animal proteins have little to no fiber. A vegetarian meal provides a good source of fiber which will…