Higher education

Successful People Make Self-Learning Their Daily Habit By Using These 20 Apps

When’s the last time you learned something new?

Do you motivate yourself to learn new skills, tips, and hacks, or do you prefer to let learning happen naturally or only when the need arises?

Mobile technology has created new pathways for all types of learning styles to help people discover new information however they learn best. Whether it’s performing a quick Google search on the go or getting a daily dose of brain buster exercises, there exist a multitude of free apps that can help you learn valuable new things every day.

Knowledge Is Power – Get Both With These 20 Best Apps

If you want to take initiative to teach yourself new things, these 20 apps for motivated learning styles will put you in information paradise.

Motivated learning styles aren’t just about active learning. If you’d rather sit back and listen to new ideas, the TED app gives you instant access to thousands of “TED Talks” that showcase what’s happening in various industries. These short lectures can deliver insight into new technology, discoveries, art, science, design, and a range of other topics.

Perhaps one of the biggest advancements in the history of e-learning, Coursera has teamed up with top schools like Duke, Stanford, and John Hopkins to bring you direct access to real college courses in psychology, computer science, business, and technology. Each course features pre-recorded videos, projects, and quizzes, just like you would receive inside the classroom.

Similar to Coursera, users can access higher education courses without the higher education expenses. You can enroll in courses and participate in quizzes, lectures, and assignments at your own pace.

While Khan Academy doesn’t offer authentic university courses like edX and Coursera, they do feature well-crafted educational lessons that can fuel your passion for learning. With more than 4,000 videos ready to watch in a tap’s notice, you can brush up on a variety of topics ranging from grade school math and science to art, economics, and computers.

Sometimes, you just don’t know what you don’t know. And the Fact App can show you some truly helpful information your brain has been missing. The app delivers daily fun, useful facts and questions on a variety of topics, including American economics, politics, and social circumstances that are geared towards helping you make informed decisions about the world around you.

One of the most popular brain training apps available, Lumosity features three-game sessions that target many different area of brain activity: memory, speed, problem solving, and thinking flexibility. Each day you can engage in a timed session to sharpen mental prowess and track your progress over time.

Users can access over 360 unique puzzles and games geared toward improving mental skills. The games start out easy, then become increasingly complex…

Study Finds Women in Academia Do More Unpaid “Service” Work

In today’s unsurprising news, a new study has found that women in academia perform more unpaid labor than men. Researchers writing in the journal Research in Higher Education say female professors are more likely—and more expected—to give their time to students, while their better-compensated male colleagues use those same hours to publish, conduct research, and advance their careers.

Education experts culled data from the 2014 Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE), which asked nearly 19,000 faculty members at 143 colleges about their interactions with their students. They also dug into detailed faculty activity reports at two institutions.

The results showed a significant difference in the way academic men and women spent their time. Female respondents to the FSSE spent an average of 30 minutes more per week on service tasks like advising students, serving on committees, and leading extracurricular activities. Even among full professors, women devoted significantly more time to service activities than their male counterparts. This was true even after the researchers controlled for variables like race, academic department, and university.

The paper’s authors couldn’t pinpoint the root cause (or…