Hunger

Cure Your Craving Without Feeling Guilty! A List of Low Calories Snacks to Keep You Full!

There is nobody that does not love good snacks. It 1curbs hunger between meals and also keeps the body fueled from early morning until late night dinners.

For anyone trying to curb weight, snacks can become quite a challenge. Small tempting bites can trap nutrition boosts as they have loads of unnecessary calories and provide a lack of sufficient nutrients. Calorie intake in turn becomes nutritionally void.

Snacks have developed a negative link to them , but no worries there is no need to fade mid morning nibbles. Bite size snacks are important in diets because they provide midday energy. Also healthy snacks resolve hunger pangs and prevent over eating at meal times.

Not all snacks are healthy. Ensure you do not keep unhealthy snacks nearby to steer away mindless nibbling. Avoid all snacks in the ‘junk-food’ categories – candy, chips, ice-cream and cookies. The best way to keep from eating junk food or other unhealthy snacks is to not have these foods stored in your home.

There are many benefits to healthy snacking:

Healthy snacking stabilises blood sugar levels.

Healthy snacking balances blood sugar levels if a consistent intake of carbs is kept. It is helpful as diabetes can cause heart disease, high blood pressure and obesity

Healthy snacks meets daily nutrition requirements . The best options that are dense in nutrients include whole grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds and low-fat dairy.

Parmeson Carrot Fries

French fries are a worldwide guilty pleasure. Swapping carrots for the spuds leaves you with a scrumptious alternative of the deep fried temptations. Roast carrots allow natural sweetness to emerge and makes a combination of a crispy finish with a soft interior, sure to tantalize the taste buds. Every serving of carrot fries comes with a healthy dose of beta carotene, fiber and vitamin A, promoting a healthy vision and skin. Top up with some basil and Parmesan sprinkles and make a sweet,savory treat.

Sweet Potato Wedges

Another way to break free from greasy deep fried french fries that cause upset stomachs are these sweet potato wedges. Seasoned with a flavor of spices with limited oil to make them crispy. Paired with a garlic and avocado mix that is packed with a healthy chunk of omega-3 fats. Drool on.

Collard Wraps

This raw green…

Why Marijuana Gives You the “Munchies”

marijuana

If you’ve ever smoked marijuana, then you’ve probably had some experience watching all three Lord of the Rings movies while eating the most delicious steak you’ve ever had owing to the fact that you decided to cover it in peanut butter and jelly. It is at this point that you might find yourself wondering why marijuana gives you the munchies.

The answer appears to be a combination of a few different things, primarily an increase in your ability to smell, which in turn makes your food taste better; an upsurge in the release of a neurotransmitter, Dopamine; and through the complex mechanism of how the human body deals with hunger, the production of an appetite stimulating hormone ghrelin. So how does marijuana accomplish all this?

Marijuana, and its active ingredients, known as cannabinoids, affect the brain in a number of ways. For instance, the cannabinoid that gives us that memory-killing-high is Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). There are at least 85 separate cannabinoids in marijuana, all exhibiting varied effects within the body. To better understand the role of these in feeling famished, let’s look at what normally stimulates our appetite.

The body uses several complex mechanisms to regulate hunger and subsequent feeding. Those mechanisms aren’t yet fully understood. However, what we do know is that hunger has been shown to be a two part mechanism that flip-flops when the body senses a decrease or excess in energy stores.

shutterstock_316922606

When it senses a deficit, it triggers the release of ghrelin. This hormone is released by the GI tract and stimulates your hypothalamus in the brain to increase hunger. Interestingly, it also affects an area of the brain known as the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA), which helps in the release of the feel-good neurotransmitter dopamine.

Conversely, when there’s an excess in energy stores, fat cells release the hormone leptin. This stimulates the hypothalamus to inhibit hunger. Leptin has also been shown to affect the VTA, thus, also affecting dopamine release. Additionally, leptin counteracts the effects of another neurotransmitter, anandamide. Anandamide is another potent hunger stimulator that binds to the same receptor sites…

Why Marijuana Gives You the “Munchies”

marijuana

If you’ve ever smoked marijuana, then you’ve probably had some experience watching all three Lord of the Rings movies while eating the most delicious steak you’ve ever had owing to the fact that you decided to cover it in peanut butter and jelly. It is at this point that you might find yourself wondering why marijuana gives you the munchies.

The answer appears to be a combination of a few different things, primarily an increase in your ability to smell, which in turn makes your food taste better; an upsurge in the release of a neurotransmitter, Dopamine; and through the complex mechanism of how the human body deals with hunger, the production of an appetite stimulating hormone ghrelin. So how does marijuana accomplish all this?

Marijuana, and its active ingredients, known as cannabinoids, affect the brain in a number of ways. For instance, the cannabinoid that gives us that memory-killing-high is Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). There are at least 85 separate cannabinoids in marijuana, all exhibiting varied effects within the body. To better understand the role of these in feeling famished, let’s look at what normally stimulates our appetite.

The body uses several complex mechanisms to regulate hunger and subsequent feeding. Those mechanisms aren’t yet fully understood. However, what we do know is that hunger has been shown to be a two part mechanism that flip-flops when the body senses a decrease or excess in energy stores.

shutterstock_316922606

When it senses a deficit, it triggers the release of ghrelin. This hormone is released by the GI tract and stimulates your hypothalamus in the brain to increase hunger. Interestingly, it also affects an area of the brain known as the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA), which helps in the release of the feel-good neurotransmitter dopamine.

Conversely, when there’s an excess in energy stores, fat cells release the hormone leptin. This stimulates the hypothalamus to inhibit hunger. Leptin has also been shown to affect the VTA, thus, also affecting dopamine release. Additionally, leptin counteracts the effects of another neurotransmitter, anandamide. Anandamide is another potent hunger stimulator that binds to the same receptor…