Hunter-gatherer

10 Best Paleo Snacks Recipes That You Need To Try Making At Home

Heard of the paleo diet but wondering what in the world does it mean? Well, the paleo comes from the Paleolithic era, aka when man was still a hunter-gatherer – what the early man ate, is basically what constitutes the paleo diet, also called the caveman diet, primal diet, Stone Age diet, and hunter-gatherer diet, for apt reasons.

The Difference between Paleo Diet And Ordinary Diet

Think back to the early times of man – other than needing to run away from predators and dying of things as simple as the common cold, the paleo man (and woman, for that matter) didn’t have access to grains, salt, processed foods, colas, junk food, chocolates, tea or coffee. What he did have access to, or hunted and foraged for were fruits, vegetable (free range) meat, poultry and eggs, sea food and as well as nuts and seeds.

Wild cereals were sometimes foraged for, but a find was few and far between so cereal was also not a big part of the Paleolithic diet at all. Recent evidence proves that wine, however was, for some time in the Paleolithic era, man learnt to ferment grape juice in animal skin pouches. 1

The Benefits of Following Paleo Diet

At first glance, the paleo diet seems pretty doable – it’s a clean diet that emphasizes eating fresh, from the source and without any additional additives, preservatives or chemicals and it does help you stay fuller for longer as well as lose weight because of limited food choices. 2This diet also raises your iron levels and helps you get plenty more phytonutrients from all the plant-based foods you consume.

The downside of the paleo diet is that the absence of grains and cereal can lower your energy levels and it is also a tad expensive. If you are on a paleo diet, you also have to maintain a certain amount of physical activity; which ironically becomes difficult to do simply because you are off carbs and may be low on energy in the first place!

The paleo diet philosophy is basically designed to improve a person’s health and athletic performance by taking in lean protein and high GI carbs via fruits and vegetables – the die does not lack in nutrients and can in fact raise your vitamin and mineral levels to an optimum amounts, plus give you plenty antioxidants and phytonutrients as well. Paleo snacks comprise of lean meats or protein, healthy amounts of dairy, healthy fats in the form of nuts and seeds and as many fruits and veggies you can eat! Healthy, tasty, filling and low in calories – paleo snacks make for great tidbits, even if you are not on a paleo diet! 3

Five Savory Paleo Snacks

Crispy Brussel Sprout Chips

A vitamin rich snack that’s nutritious, tasty and filling, Crispy Brussels Sprouts 4 will please your palate and stomach in just about 50 calories.

You need: 10 Brussels sprouts, 1 tablespoon olive oil and 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

To make it:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. With a paring knife, cut off the bottom tip of each sprout. The outer leaves will fall off.
  3. Trim a tiny bit more off the bottom so more leaves fall off. Continue until you’ve removed all the leaves.
  4. Toss the leaves with the oil, and lay them in one layer on a rimmed baking sheet.
  5. Sprinkle with salt.
  6. Roast seven to 10 minutes, until leaves are lightly browned and crisp.

Who says snacks have to be bland? Healthy pumpkin seeds 5 with real jalapenos with olive oil and seasonings are as healthy as they are delicious.

You need: 1 1/2 cups pumpkin seeds, cleaned & dried; 3 jalapeño peppers, sliced; 3 tablespoons olive oil and sea salt and paprika, to taste

To make it:

  1. Remove the seeds from the pumpkin and sort the guts out.
  2. Rinse the seeds pat dry and transfer to a rimmed baking sheet to dry overnight.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350°F and add olive oil and sea salt.
  4. Stir pumpkin seeds with your hands to combine.
  5. Lay slices of jalapeño peppers on top of seeds.
  6. Sprinkle paprika over the top of everything, generously.
  7. Bake for 10 minutes.
  8. Use a spatula to move the seeds and peppers around and bake for another 5 minutes.
  9. Move mixture around some more and bake for a final 5 minutes.
  10. Remove tray from oven and let everything rest for 15-30 minutes to let the jalapeño-ness soak into the seeds.
  11. Store in an airtight container, if you don’t finish them all in one sitting.

Have a craving for chips? Can do on a paleo diet with this crunchy, chip alternative 6 to Doritos, that uses no flour.

You need: 3/4 cup almond flour, 1/4 cup coconut flour, 1/4 cup flax seeds, 1/4 cup of butter (or ghee), 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1 1/2 teaspoon chili, 1/2 teaspoon cumin, 1/2 teaspoon paprika powder, 1 egg and 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

To make it:

  1. Melt the butter and basically…

Dog DNA study maps breeds across the world

dog breeds
With a new dataset, man digs into the genetic history of his best friend.

Mapping the relationships between different dog breeds is rough (get it?), but a team of scientists at the National Institutes of Health did just that using the DNA of 1,346 dogs from 161 breeds. Their analysis, which appears April 25 in Cell Reports, offers a lot to chew on.

Here are five key findings from the work:

Dogs were bred for specific jobs, and this shows in their genes.

As human lifestyles shifted from hunting and gathering to herding to agriculture and finally urbanization, humans bred dogs (Canis familiaris) accordingly. Then over the last 200 years, more and more breeds emerged within those categories. Humans crossed breeds to create hybrids based on appearance and temperament, and those hybrids eventually became new breeds.

DNA from hybrid dogs backs up historical records.

Genetic backtracking indicates that, for example, mixing between bulldogs and terriers traces back to Ireland…

Ötzi the Iceman froze to death

 Ötzi the Tyrolean Iceman
DEEP FREEZE Ötzi the Tyrolean Iceman, shown here at a research center, died of exposure to cold temperatures in the Italian Alps, a new study concludes. Shoulder and head injuries may have made it difficult for the Copper Age hunter-gatherer to get around but that’s not what killed him, researchers say.

NEW ORLEANS — Ever since Ötzi’s mummified body was found in the Italian Alps in 1991, researchers have been trying to pin down how the 5,300-year-old Tyrolean Iceman died. It now looks like this Copper Age hunter-gatherer simply froze to death, perhaps after suffering minor blood loss from an arrow wound to his left shoulder, anthropologist Frank Rühli of the University of Zurich reported April 20 at the annual meeting of the American Association…

Science journalists don’t use the science of ‘nudge’

The “nudge” may have been formalized in a 2008 book, but I’d bet that the core concept — simple strategies for influencing other people’s decisions — dates back at least to the rise of human language. It wouldn’t surprise me if early hunter-gatherers on African savannas relied on some strategies of persuasion to convince, for example, other members of the group to help hunt for food. These hunter-gatherers weren’t analyzing what text message to send and when, questions that can concern today’s “choice architects,” as described by behavioral sciences writer Bruce Bower in “Nudge backlash.” But the most astute communicators might have realized that appealing to survival, adventure or sense of duty could lead to varying results. And they might have adjusted their messages accordingly.

A lot of human communication, in fact, is designed around achieving specific results. So much of what we see on TV and online is aimed at selling us a product or an idea, with some strategies subtler than others. Even communications among family members or friends can be deliberately tilted toward building relationships and establishing trust. It’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Recently in Boston, at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, I attended a session…