Infant

What Young Families Can Do To Save More Money

how families can save money
how families can save money

Whether you have more than one child or you’re a first-time parent, babies are expensive and there’s no way around it. Building your family is probably a dream come true for you, but it doesn’t go without any complications.

Luckily, there are many tricks to make the transition a little easier for you to handle on a budget. Here’s a quick guide on how families can save money, especially with a newborn.

Avoid Eating Out

Eating out is more convenient than taking the time to prepare and cook a meal, but it is more expensive. When you have a newborn at home, you can’t afford to go without any essentials. Find as many sales as possible in your local grocery stores. Your days and nights may run together with a newborn in the home, but most of your money will remain in your wallet when you don’t eat out all the time.

Try making freezer meals a couple weeks ahead of your baby’s arrival. This way you’ll have the time to make good, healthy meals before the craziness of the baby takes over, and you’ll have fewer chances to give into the temptation of ordering out.

See Also: Foods That Will Help You Keep Your Family Healthy

Breastfeed Your Newborn

If you can, breastfeed your newborn as well. Your breastmilk is free and, according to studies, offers a lot more nutrition to help in your baby’s development.

Formula milk is expensive whether you buy a branded or generic formula. It can cost more than $100 each month which translates to $1,200 per year. You can keep this money in your pocket by breastfeeding your…

Evidence is lacking that ‘cocooning’ prevents whooping cough in newborns

family visiting newborn baby
The cocooning strategy, in which people who will be in contact with a newborn all receive vaccinations to protect the vulnerable baby, may not be that protective after all. Better protection against whooping cough comes from vaccinating a mother during pregnancy, scientists say.

THE HERD

Last week, I wrote about how powerfully protective whooping cough vaccines can be when babies receive their first dose before even being born, from their pregnant mothers-to-be. As I was looking through that study, another of its findings struck me: Babies didn’t seem to get any extra whooping cough protection when their moms were vaccinated after giving birth.

I wondered if this meant that I was unreasonable when I insisted my parents be fully boosted before visiting their first granddaughter. If post-birth vaccinations aren’t that important for mothers, who are entwined in every way imaginable with their newborns, is it likely that grandparents’ vaccination status is all that important?

The practice of making sure people who come into contact with a vulnerable newborn are up on their shots is called “cocooning.” The idea is based on straight-ahead logic: By eliminating dangerous germs from those people, the newborn is protected. She can’t catch what isn’t there.

While it’s a good idea to make sure everyone is current on vaccines, the evidence for cocooning as a way to keep infants healthy has been lacking. “I…

Vaccinating pregnant women protects newborns from whooping cough

pregnant woman getting a vaccine
A Tdap vaccine during pregnancy led to fewer newborns getting whooping cough in the two months after birth, a large study found.

When I was pregnant, my pronoun shifted automatically. My “I” turned into “we,” as in, “What are we going to eat for dinner?” and, “Should we sit in that hot tub?” I thought about that shift to the majestic plural as we got our Tdap shot in our third trimester.

The Tdap vaccine protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, or whooping cough. Doctors recommend that women receive a dose with each pregnancy because the diseases can be particularly dangerous for young babies. But good, hard evidence for the benefits of vaccinating women while pregnant instead of shortly after giving birth has been lacking. A new study of nearly 150,000 newborns fills that gap for whooping cough.

Researchers at the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center in Oakland, Calif., studied the medical records of mothers who gave birth to babies between 2010 and 2015. Overall, about 46 percent of the mothers received a Tdap vaccine at least 8 days before giving birth.

Seventeen of the 150,000 babies got whooping cough by the time…

Vaccinating pregnant women protects newborns from whooping cough

pregnant woman getting a vaccine
A Tdap vaccine during pregnancy led to fewer newborns getting whooping cough in the two months after birth, a large study found.

When I was pregnant, my pronoun shifted automatically. My “I” turned into “we,” as in, “What are we going to eat for dinner?” and, “Should we sit in that hot tub?” I thought about that shift to the majestic plural as we got our Tdap shot in our third trimester.

The Tdap vaccine protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, or whooping cough. Doctors recommend that women receive a dose with each pregnancy because the diseases can be particularly dangerous for young babies. But good, hard evidence for the benefits of vaccinating women while pregnant instead of shortly after giving birth has been lacking. A new study of nearly 150,000 newborns fills that gap for whooping cough.

Researchers at the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center in Oakland, Calif., studied the medical records of mothers who gave birth to babies between 2010 and 2015. Overall, about 46 percent of the mothers received a Tdap vaccine at least 8 days before giving birth.

Seventeen of the 150,000 babies got whooping cough by the time…

Furry Friends Could Help Prevent Allergies and Obesity in Babies

Two of life’s great joys—dogs and babies—might be even better together. A study published in the journal Microbiome found higher levels of allergy-preventing bacteria in babies who lived with furry pets like dogs and cats.

The relationship between our environments, immune systems, and gut microbes is a tangled one. Studies have found that “dirty behaviors” like thumb-sucking and nail-biting might actually help protect kids against autoimmune conditions, as can living on a farm. So it’s not too much of a stretch to think that our four-legged companions might have a similarly beneficial effect.

To explore the idea further, researchers at the University of Alberta pulled data from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study, which followed the lives…

Language heard, but never spoken, by young babies bestows a hidden benefit

mother and baby laughing and playing
Babies who heard Korean spoken in their first six months of life were better able to pick up the language later as adults, a study finds. The results show how early language exposure patterns the brain in ways that may not be revealed for decades, if ever.

The way babies learn to speak is nothing short of breathtaking. Their brains are learning the differences between sounds, rehearsing mouth movements and mastering vocabulary by putting words into meaningful context. It’s a lot to fit in between naps and diaper changes.

A recent study shows just how durable this early language learning is. Dutch-speaking adults who were adopted from South Korea as preverbal babies held on to latent Korean language skills, researchers report online January 18 in Royal Society Open Science. In the first months of their lives, these people had already laid down the foundation for speaking Korean — a foundation that persisted for decades undetected, only revealing itself later in careful laboratory tests.

Researchers tested how well people could learn to identify and speak tricky Korean sounds. “For Korean listeners, these sounds are easy to distinguish, but for second-language…