International Space Station

Top 5 Uncommon Jobs In The US And How To Get Them

uncommon jobs
uncommon jobs

The stars and sky don’t fascinate everyone. Furthermore, not everyone has the desire to leave the planet to explore.

This is what makes Clayton C. Anderson different from most people. Clayton was an astronaut and previous resident of the international space station for 152 days. In his book, “An Ordinary Spaceman”, he explains that when he started as an astronaut candidate, he earned $90,000. When he retired, he was on a salary of $150,000.

Despite the digits, being an astronaut is not always about the money. As British astronaut Tim Peake said of space travel, “Living and working on board the International Space Station is the best place you could be as a professional.”

So, how do you become an astronaut? NASA’s basic requirements involve:

  • Receiving a bachelor’s degree from a university accredited for mathematics, engineering or physical science….

How Does the Restroom in the International Space Station Work?

How does the restroom in the International Space Station work? Since there is no gravity there, I am assuming things are quite different.

You are right, the absence of gravitational acceleration makes things a bit different.

Below is a picture of one of the toilets used for training purposes on the ground. The one onboard is almost identical.

The first thing an astronaut has to do is make sure he or she is seated properly. You can’t just sit down in space, since there is no down. So, you’ll notice there are straps to hold their feet so they won’t float away, mid-use.

The next thing the astronaut has to do is make sure they are aligned correctly. There…

The International Space Station Will Have Its First African-American Crewmember

January 2017 has been a very good month for the American space program. First there was the premiere of the movie Hidden Figures, which celebrates the incredible minds and achievements of NASA legends Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and Mary Jackson. Now, on the heels of the film’s release, NASA has announced that Jeanette J. Epps will soon become the first African-American crewmember of the International Space Station (ISS).

Epps has been working toward this moment for a very long time, from her doctorate in physics and aerospace engineering to a seven-year stint as a technical intelligence officer with the CIA [PDF]. She joined NASA in 2009 as part of the agency’s 20th class of astronauts, and…