List of counseling topics

Seeking Help for Family Problems: List of Family Counseling Providers to Consider

Family counseling, although it’s been seen as a step taken by people whose marriages are going to hit the rocks anyway, could actually prove effective. Over the years, people have been known to use family and marriage counseling as a way to sort out issues which they are facing in their homes and to have a new breath and lease of life in their families. Although on the average, family counseling seems to be helpful, there are some that seem to be more effective than the other. However, before we share out top picks with you, here are some tips you should know about family counseling before you go into it.

Family Counseling Isn’t a Substitute for Personal Activity

Basically, this means that although you’ll get clarity and certain solutions through a family counseling effort, it still doesn’t fill the void created by your inactivity and inability to do certain things. A family counseling effort will only tell you what to do. You’ve still got to act by yourself and see things work. Otherwise, there’s no reason why you should go into counseling in the first place.

It Doesn’t Always Work

Although family counselors won’t want to admit this, family counseling won’t always work for you. This is because sometimes families have issues that family counseling just can’t fix. These issues usually get ironed out by simple confrontations and self searching.1 So if you do go for a family counseling session and it seems not to be yielding any results, it’s a pretty clear pointer that you’re not necessarily in the right place.

You should consider family counseling if you’re experiencing any of the following:

  • A prolonged feeling of sadness or helplessness about the issues facing your marriage and despite the efforts that you, your extended family and friends put in, things don’t seem to get better. Basically, this means that counseling shouldn’t be your first resort. You have to have put in a considerable amount of effort in trying to fix the problem before eventually resorting to family counseling.
  • A difficulty to carry out everyday activities, perhaps due to the stress being developed by your issues at home. At this point, seek help…..and FAST. You might be on the verge of a breakdown and that’s…

Genetic risk of getting second cancer tallied for pediatric survivors

childhood cancer
RISK ROUNDUP Some pediatric cancer survivors carry genetic mutations that increase the risk of a later, second cancer.

WASHINGTON — A second cancer later in life is common for childhood cancer survivors, and scientists now have a sense of the role genes play when this happens. A project that mined the genetic data of a group of survivors finds that 11.5 percent carry mutations that increase the risk of a subsequent cancer.

“We’ve always known that among survivors, a certain population will experience adverse outcomes directly related to therapy,” says epidemiologist and team member Leslie Robison of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis. The project sought “to find out what contribution genetics may play.” The team presented their work at the American Association of Cancer Research meeting April 3.

“This is a nice first step,” says David Malkin, a pediatric oncologist at the University of Toronto. “The results validate the thoughts of those of us who believe there is a genetic risk that increases the risk of second malignancies.”

Five-year survival rates for kids with cancer have grown to more than 80 percent. But “there are long-term consequences for having been diagnosed and treated for cancer as a child,” notes Robison. Some survivors develop a later, second cancer due to the radiation or chemotherapy that treated the first cancer (SN: 3/10/07, p. 157).

The researchers examined 3,007 survivors of pediatric cancer who routinely undergo medical evaluation at St. Jude. About a third had leukemia as children. By age 45, 29 percent of this group had developed new tumors, often in the skin, breast or thyroid.

The team cataloged…