Male

Why everyone is suddenly talking about male rompers

Introducing rompers ... for men

(CNN)Male romper. RompHim. Bro romper (bromper?). Public onesie. Jumpsuit, variety: short. Or, perhaps, just a romper that happens to be worn by a man.

Whatever you call it, the one-piece clothing item preferred by babies and women at outdoor concerts has officially hit the male fashion mainstream.

The sartorial whisper became a scream this week when a project called “RompHim” launched on Kickstarter. RompHim is, quite obviously, a man-sized romper offered in several pastel colors and prints.

There's a lot to unpack here.

The campaign presents the RompHim as a mildly obnoxious, devil-may-care garment for young men with an abundance of money and/or self confidence, who never skip leg day and spend the summer weekends at their bro’s house on the Cape. Which is not to judge! That is definitely an aesthetic.

In fact, it is an aesthetic that men — and the people that love to look at them — are clearly longing for. In two days, the Kickstarter has raised more than $136,000, which is 13 times the $10,000 goal they were shooting for.

On social media, you may have noticed an explosion of romper-related jokes and assumed the stream of alarming political news had driven people into some sort of dissociative fugue state. Maybe! But it was also people discovering that a) male rompers existed, and b) they are cool now.

Rompers like this understated number have been available for years, but the trend is hitting the mainstream hard.

Watch male cuttlefish fight over a female in the wild

cuttlefish
MACHO MACHO MAN Field footage hints that male cuttlefish conflicts over who gets to mate with a female may be more violent in the wild than those observed in captivity.

The Bro Code apparently does not exist among wild cuttlefish. The first field video of male European cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) getting physical over a female shows that they are not above stealing another guy’s girl.

Cuttlefish, cephalopods known for their ability to alter their skin color, have complex and competitive courtship rituals. While scientists have extensively studied common European cuttlefish fights over mates, observing such altercations has proven elusive outside of the lab.

In 2011, biologists Justine Allen of Brown University in Providence, R.I., and Derya Akkaynak of the University of Haifa in Israel lucked out. They were in the Aegean Sea off the coast of Turkey following a…