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Androgynous Model Poses As Both Man And Woman To Challenge Gender Stereotypes

Meet Rain Dove – the androgynous model that walks the runway in both menswear and womenswear.

Though Rain didn’t always see herself as androgynous. Instead, she saw herself as an “ugly women”. “I never had bad feelings about it, I just felt that maybe I was that one girl,” Dove told After Ellen. “It wasn’t until I was wilderness firefighter for a while and that’s when I felt more empowered in my ambiguity and sexuality as far as gender presentation goes.”

Quite frequently, people assume Rain is male, but she doesn’t correct them. Instead, Rain takes advantage of these “misunderstandings”. “When I was a firefighter they thought I was a male and I went with it because I really need a job and I was out in the middle of nowhere in Colorado,” she said. “So I utilized my gender bending profile as something that had gotten me a bunch of odd jobs from nannying to landscape.” And that’s when it all started… Now, Rain Dove is an activist, she is pursuing acting, and she is the model that turns heads on the runway in both menswear and womenswear. “We’re all struggling to be unique and the most unique thing…

Why Men Don’t Make More Than Women Infographic

Why women actually don't make less than men

The claim that women make 77 cents to every dollar men make disregards many choices women make, leading to false claims on social inequality and skewing gender debates.

It’s true, but only if you don’t account for occupations, positions, education, job tenure and hours worked per week which lower the wage gap to about a nickel.

What’s really going on then?

Expectations and sex-based stereotypes push men towards STEM careers (Science Technology Engineering math) and women towards “pink-collar” health and education jobs. The real wage gap is expanded by common choices by gender, like what college major you choose. Males overwhelmingly choose higher paying majors, females lower paying majors. This is abased not…

Study Finds Women in Academia Do More Unpaid “Service” Work

In today’s unsurprising news, a new study has found that women in academia perform more unpaid labor than men. Researchers writing in the journal Research in Higher Education say female professors are more likely—and more expected—to give their time to students, while their better-compensated male colleagues use those same hours to publish, conduct research, and advance their careers.

Education experts culled data from the 2014 Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE), which asked nearly 19,000 faculty members at 143 colleges about their interactions with their students. They also dug into detailed faculty activity reports at two institutions.

The results showed a significant difference in the way academic men and women spent their time. Female respondents to the FSSE spent an average of 30 minutes more per week on service tasks like advising students, serving on committees, and leading extracurricular activities. Even among full professors, women devoted significantly more time to service activities than their male counterparts. This was true even after the researchers controlled for variables like race, academic department, and university.

The paper’s authors couldn’t pinpoint the root cause (or…

Overnight, Bulgaria’s Capital Gets the City’s First Monuments to Women

Bulgaria’s capital, Sofia, has plenty of historic monuments to men. But there are no statues of real, historic women in the city (as opposed to symbols like “a mother”). In the entire city, only 6 percent of memorials, like plaques, honor a female figure at all, according to official city data. But, on March 24, seven new monuments seemed to pop up overnight, Mashable reports.

MONUMENT #1—an art piece by Irina Tomova-Erka—highlights the lack of women’s accomplishments celebrated throughout the city by adding new, neon-colored busts of female figures. Well, just one figure, actually—the artist herself.

“The sculptures are a portrait of me, as I wanted to take a strong personal, public stance as a contemporary woman and artist,” Tomova-Erka says in a press release. “However, they are also anonymous, as they do not bear my name. They are only marked by a sign ‘The first monument of a woman in Sofia’. In…