Microsoft PowerPoint

Microsoft builds real-time translation for PowerPoint

What’s better than a presentation to one audience? A presentation that can be given to any audience in any country, in any language, without laborious hand-translation.

That’s the promise of a new Microsoft PowerPoint cognitive service, PowerPoint Presentation Translator cooked up by Garage (Microsoft’s experimental project arm) and demonstrated publicly for the first time on Wednesday at the company’s Build developers conference in Seattle.

PowerPoint Presentation Translator can auto-translate slides in any one of a dozen languages, including Hungarian, Czech, French, Chinese, German and Spanish. Even more impressively, it will live-translate the presenter’s word in a caption box just below the presentation.

Backed by machine learning, the cognitive service doesn’t just try to find a language match for every word —…

What Is Windows S, and How Is It Different?

Windows 10 S is “the soul of today’s Windows”, according to Microsoft. It’s a new version of Windows intended for school PCs, but available to everyone. It’s designed to be more simple and streamlined, so it only runs applications from the Windows Store—unless you spend another $50 to upgrade to Windows 10 Pro.

Microsoft announced that Acer, Asus, Dell, Fujitsu, HP, Samsung, and Toshiba will ship Windows 10 S education PCs starting at $189, starting this summer. Microsoft is also releasing a $999 Surface Laptop, which runs Windows 10 S.

How Is Windows 10 S Different?

The biggest difference in Windows 10 S is that can only run apps downloaded from the Windows Store. These apps are checked for security and run in a secure container. This ensures that applications can’t mess with your registry, leave files behind, or cause problems with the rest of your PC. You can get the same benefits by running those new Universal apps from the Windows Store on a Windows 10 PC. But unlike normal Windows 10, you won’t have the option of downloading other apps that aren’t available in the store.

Thankfully, full versions of Microsoft Office 365 applications—Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and OneNote—are coming to the Windows Store soon. They’re packaged using Microsoft’s Project Centennial, which allows traditional Windows desktop applications to be run in a secure container and placed in the Windows Store. The application’s developer just has to package the application and submit it to the Store. Hopefully, Windows 10 S will give more desktop application developers the push to do so.

As Microsoft noted at its May 2 event, “Windows 10 S can run any web browser in the Windows Store”. That just includes Microsoft Edge right now, but Microsoft clearly wants Google and Mozilla…