Millennials

The Millennials’ Mania Over Social Media

millennials and social media
millennials and social media

In 2017, millennials’ inclination to technology is expected to slowly reshape the digital landscape. The way they take back steps to evaluate their social media use, which platforms they should use, and what content they want to have access to can greatly affect the way social media works.

The Millennials’ Take on Facebook

Facebook started out as a social platform for college students. It quickly expanded and became accessible even to the older people. Despite the expansion, millennials continue to be the biggest force in there.

According to a recent survey, 41% of millennials still use Facebook every day. However, a big part of this number also favors Instagram, Youtube, Pinterest and Twitter, just to name a few. One reason for this shift is that millennials are no longer happy using Facebook. Comparison of feeds and activities are no longer exciting for them.

But, despite the statistics, the universality of Facebook still stands out. Millennials who are still using Facebook say that looking for good and interesting articles is one of the reasons why they keep using the platform.

Younger Millennials Favor Disappearing Media

Older millennials have become accustomed to the idea that once something is posted on the internet, it is there to stay forever. And we’re okay with that, even as new technologies claim to make this notion moot.

But, for most younger millennials, the hype of disappearing digital content is just too tempting to ignore. They like the idea that intimate thoughts, daring pictures, and incomprehensible ramblings could disappear forever.

As much as technology and the users are constantly evolving, so is our…

6 Millennial Money Habits Every Retiree Should Learn

When it comes to money matters, Millennials don’t always get a good rap. These young adults are likely to view themselves in good financial health so long as they make the bills at the end of the month, let alone stow a little extra away for retirement. But don’t mistake them as financial illiterates. In fact, there are some common ways Millennials handle their money that could benefit the older generations. (See also: 6 Ways Millennials Have Changed Money So Far)

1. Get Creative

As retirees age, their expenditures fall — but their income drops even faster. Perhaps retirees, who are unlikely to jump back into the traditional workforce due to a suddenly trickling cash flow, can benefit from some Millennial-style money tactics. Indeed, Millennials know how to get creative when it comes to their earnings. The old rules simply didn’t apply to this generation of ’80s and ’90s babies that entered adulthood during the uncertainty of the financial recession. So, they made their own rules. They found their own innovative ways to survive. And now, as they continue to develop a distinctly entrepreneurial spirit, many Millennials are beginning to thrive.

More than any other generation, Millennials have embraced the sharing economy, in which a lawn mower, their car, or a spare bedroom can become a valuable source of revenue. The average Airbnb host earns more than $20,000 a year renting out a full, two-bedroom apartment or house in a major city, and this is exactly the kind of peripheral revenue stream that Millennials have become accustomed to seeking out for themselves.

When it comes to ride-sharing, 21% of Millennials have used user-powered programs like Lyft and Uber to save money while on vacation. Among other age groups, those numbers are much lower — 7% for Gen-Xers and 4% for Baby Boomers. For older retirees, the percentage is presumably even lower. Yet transportation is a significant expense for most retirees, and it’s one that could potentially be lowered through the use of ride-sharing — not only during a vacation, but on a daily basis. Older households spend about $8,000 a year on transportation, ranging from a high of $9,321 for the 55 to 64 age group, to a low of $5,091 for the 75-and-older group, according to federal data.

2. Don’t Buy Stuff, Spend on Experiences Instead

Millennials highly value experiences — concerts, yoga festivals, French lessons, surf lessons, palm readings, trips to Italy — and they…