Nutrient

Flax Seed: The Superfood For Glowing Hair And Healthy Skin (And Other Benefits!)

Want an easy and delicious way to boost your daily nutritional intake? Look no further than flax seeds, your new go-to miracle food. These stellar seeds are severely misunderstood as they are considered to be bland and dry. They are loaded with nutrients and have incredible binding properties which is a must-have for vegan baking. With the correct preparation, you will start to realize that they are a pantry essential.

It’s so versatile, you can wear flax as well as eat it!

Flax seed was originally cultivated in the Middle East around the era of 2000 B.C.1 Through the effects of foreign trade and demand, flax production has dispersed throughout the globe, with Canada being it’s leading producer; followed by Russia, France, and Argentina.

Because flax seed was recognized for its abundance of fiber early on, it has always been used for both culinary and textile purposes. The flax seed market has been steadily increasing in recent years due to its long over-due recognition for its nourishing properties, as well as it’s textile durability.

Flax seed is little in size but it contains many nutrients!

Just 1 ounce of flax seeds (equal to 3 tablespoons) will provide you with:

• Omega-3

• Fiber 8g

• Protein 6g

• Vitamin B1 31% RDA

• Mangenese 35% RDA

Don’t be fooled by their teeny tiny size, these little suckers pack quite a beneficial punch. In addition to the nutrients listed, flax seeds are also abundant in phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B6, iron, potassium, copper and zinc. To ensure that you are getting enough flax, add at least 2 tablespoons to your daily routine!

Flax offers way more than just fiber!

If you are familiar with flax seed, then you may already know that it’s packed with fiber which is vital for regulating cholesterol levels as well as blood sugar levels. But what else do these helpful little seeds have to offer?2

Healthy Skin and Hair

Flax seeds contain ALA fats which benefit the skin and hair by providing essential fats and B vitamins which reduces flakiness and dryness which can lead to dandruff. It can also help to decrease the appearance of acne, rosacea and eczema. Flax has also been found to reduce dry eyes.

High in Anti-Oxidants

The antioxidants found in flax seeds are known as Lignans. These are fiber-related polyphenols that provide…

Zinc: The Usually Forgotten Micronutrient We Need Daily and Its Food Source

Zinc, as you may know, is a metal. It is also important that you get it into your diet. On this page, we are going to talk a little bit about the benefits of zinc, before we cover some of the best foods to get some zinc into your diet.

Why do you need zinc in your diet?

When most people think about getting zinc into their diet, they think about the job of zinc as a natural cold remedy. However, the purpose of the mineral is a lot more important than this. It can help with the following:

  • Assists with the production of hormones in your body
  • Boosts your immune system
  • Helps digestion
  • Acts as an anti-inflammatory which could help to reduce pain in your body
  • Can assist with preventing some forms of cancer
  • Can tackle heat disease

Those who have a zinc deficiency, even a small amount, are at an increased risk of diabetes or infertility. Basically, it is a very important nutrient.

How much zinc should you consume?

You do not need that much zinc in your body each day. Adult males will require at least 11mg a day. Adult females around 8 milligrams. Children will need slightly less, but we are going to firmly focus on adults here.

However, we do want to note that in babies, the combination of Zinc and Vitamin K benefits 1 them incredibly. While they do not serve the same purpose, neither of them can be found in human breast milk. As a result, it is likely that the child will need to get them into their diet in some other way to promote normal development.

Top 10 Food with A Rich Source of Zinc

Let’s take a little look at a list of some of the best zinc-containing foods, shall we?

You will find 32mg of zinc in 6 raw oysters. This is 400% the RDA. This means that oysters are the best source of zinc around.

You can cook your oysters however you want. We like to keep things simple, however. We suggest that you fry them with a few herbs and maybe some cheese drizzled over the top. You can also throw the oysters into a good fish stew. While you can eat oysters raw, it is not recommended.

There is 7mg of zinc in 3 ounces of braised chuck roast.

In addition to the zinc, you will also find vitamin B12, a much-needed vitamin for keeping your…

10 High Protein Low Fat Foods That All Gym People Need In Their Diet

If you are among active individuals seeking the best results from your exercise routine, diet, and lifestyle, the right balance of protein, carbohydrates, and low-fat foods are key factors that can provide you with the right nutrients and the most energy with few negative effects. Proteins are especially important for gym goers because they’re essential for building and repairing muscles and maintaining glycogen levels that support energy. That’s why you probably overheard fellow gym members talking about their high-protein, low-fat foods.

When you start a workout regimen, many concerns will come up. Will you be able to maintain muscle mass at a calorie deficit? Is it possible to maintain/gain muscle while losing fat? How do you maximize your performance at the gym? And on many days you will find yourself wondering how to recover from that muscle soreness as fast as possible. The answer to all these questions is protein.

Diet Essentials for fitness enthusiasts

  • High protein foods are very filling; they help build muscle, reduce cravings and fire up weight loss. Proteins are the most essential macronutrient for gym goers. In contrast, high-fat foods can slow down digestion and make food sit in your stomach for too long especially just before a workout.
  • Breakfast is extremely important to pump you full of energy at the beginning of your day. Complex carbohydrates, lean protein, healthy fats, and a variety of fruits and vegetables can all help boost energy and maximize nutrient levels. The most important macros to include in your breakfast, however, are proteins and complex carbohydrates.
  • Foods that support healthy brain functions should be a staple in every healthy diet. The best brain foods are those rich in omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants. These include wild caught salmon, blueberries, nuts and seeds and avocados.

Do you feel tired easily during workouts?

  • If so, your body may be missing a substance called creatine to help top up energy levels. Creative is also leaked out of the muscles during workouts. This increases a condition called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)
  • Creatine is found in high-protein foods such as red meat or in protein powders. 3-5…

Changing climate could worsen foods’ nutrition

Arizona wheat field
CROP FUTURES Experiments using circles of white pipes blowing extra carbon dioxide over crops suggest that certain nutrients may dwindle in crops grown in a carbon-enhanced future atmosphere. Here, researchers in Arizona measure the growth of wheat.

A dinner plate piled high with food from plants might not deliver the same nutrition toward the end of this century as it does today. Climate change could shrink the mineral and protein content of wheat, rice and other staple crops, mounting evidence suggests.

Selenium, a trace element essential for human health, already falls short in diets of one in seven people worldwide. Studies link low selenium with such troubles as weak immune systems and cognitive decline. And in severely selenium-starved spots in China, children’s bones don’t grow to normal size or shape. This vital element could become sparser in soils of major agricultural regions as the climate changes, an international research group announced online February 21 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Likewise, zinc and iron deficiencies could grow as micronutrients dwindle in major crops worldwide, Harvard University colleagues Samuel Myers and Peter Huybers and collaborators warned in a paper published online January 6 in the Annual Review of Public Health. Futuristic field experiments on wheat and other major crops predict that more people will slip into nutritional deficits late in this century because of dips in protein content, Myers reported February 16 at the Climate and Health Meeting held in Atlanta.

“If we’d sat down 10 years ago and tried to think what the effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions might be on human health, none of us would have anticipated that one effect would be to make our food less nutritious,” Myers said. “But we can’t fundamentally disrupt and reconfigure most of the natural systems around our planet without encountering unintended consequences.”

Figuring out those unintended nutrient consequences isn’t easy. For selenium, scientists have only a rough idea of the element’s global movements. It’s unclear what proportions erode out of rocks or waft onto land from sea, says biogeochemist Lenny Winkel of ETH Zurich and the Swiss aquatic research group Eawag in Dübendorf. She was the principal investigator for the selenium in soils project in the new Proceedings paper. As far as she knows, it presents the first global look at selenium concentrations in soils and what basic factors influence what’s there. This scale, she says, was “a bit bold.”

Starting with more than 33,000 data points from other sources, Winkel and colleagues pieced together a map of selenium concentrations in soils across much of the globe. Climate popped out as one of the more important predictors of selenium content in soil, a link that hadn’t shown up in small studies. Places where climate turns land arid generally have lower selenium, but soil character matters, too. Places with high organic carbon, as in a woodland rich with fallen leaves, as well as places with abundant clay, tend to do better at retaining selenium.

Story continues after map

Selenium slump

Soil concentrations of the element selenium, essential for human life, could change by the end of the 21st century, according to computer simulations based on an intermediate scenario for climate change (a scenario that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change labels RCP6.0). The analysis identified what influences soil selenium now — including precipitation and concentrations of organic carbon in soil — and predicted future concentrations based on those influences.

G.D. Jones et al/PNAS 2017

By the end of the century, about two-thirds of heavily cultivated agricultural land would probably lose selenium under an intermediate scenario of climate change, Winkel and colleagues conclude. With a projected average end-century warming of 2.2 degrees Celsius compared with 1986 to 2005, selenium drops in breadbasket regions in the study by an average of 8.7 percent. Only 19 percent of croplands seem likely to gain selenium.

The new map “is worrisome,” says plant physiologist Philip White of the James Hutton Institute in Invergowrie, Scotland. White, who studies agricultural plants,…