Parent

Dad’s Shares Safety Warning For Parents Whose Kids Play Baseball

A Pennsylvania dad’s viral Facebook post is spreading a safety message for parents of young baseball players.

On May 16, John Curtin posted a photo of his son’s Under Armour heart guard shirt ― a special garment designed to protect athletes from potentially deadly blows to the chest.

For all you parents that have children that pitch, do me a favor and run out and buy a heart guard shirt.for your child. My 11 year old Ryan wears one and it literally might have saved his life today. He was pitching and one of the hardest hit line drives came back and hit him straight dead center in the chest and the heart guard absorbed the hit. He was in a lot of pain but a lot better than the alternative. The other coach is an emt and said if he didn’t have that on that he might have been giving my son cpr. It was one of the scariest moments I ever had with my kids. We are at urgent care getting chest xrays now. Just some advice. $30 to…

When Parents Are Trying Too Hard, Loving Their Kids Becomes Destroying Them

is a constant question with no definite answer. Will this benefit my child? How will my choices and actions affect them in the future? The truth is, everyone is doing their best. And as a parent trying their best, you must understand that your child is also doing their best. In your efforts to push them to success, you may be hurting their self-esteem 1 in the process.

Expectation Isn’t Everything

All parents want what is best for their kids, and for them to have the opportunities that they didn’t. Or perhaps they just want them to follow in their footsteps to achieve the level of greatness that they have, or better. That’s why they choose to instill those values in them at an early age. To work hard, and to do well.

Children absolutely need that encouragement and that support to excel and flourish. But there definitely is a limit. When the need for success is taking a toll on your child’s happiness, 2 parents need to look at the bigger picture here. Their personal well-being is more important than achieving a perfect score. Parents’ needs for their flawless success could be blinding them from their deflating ego. While children need their parents’ support to thrive, they need it even more when they fail.

We all excel in different forms of intelligence.

This unnerving need to succeed, achieve, and win can have some very negative effects on a developing child’s well-being. They will harbor this supposed value throughout their lives, leaving them completely devastated in the event that they inevitably fail. College students especially struggle with this when they are unable to achieve sometimes unrealistic expectations.

This negative reaction to failure is an indication of low self-esteem, which is a learned reaction that deepens over time. To these kids, it is completely unacceptable and they are less of a person for making a mistake.

What these children never learned, because their parents may have not been aware, is that there are nine types of intelligence’s.3 Just because an individual does not excel in one area does not mean that they are unintelligent or incapable.

  1. Nature Intelligence
  2. Musical Intelligence
  3. Logical-Mathematical Intelligence
  4. Existential Intelligence
  5. Interpersonal Intelligence
  6. Bodily-Kinetic Intelligence
  7. Linguistic Intelligence
  8. Personal Intelligence
  9. Spatial Intelligence

If your child is struggling academically, look at their strengths and weaknesses. Help them to excel in the areas that naturally “click” with them, and get them extra help where they might come up short. Consider your own…

Resourceful Dad Shares Awesome Diaper Genie Hack For Parents

Parents, prepare for some hack magic!

Vermont dad is sharing one way that parents of babies can make more cost effective decisions.

”Diaper Genie Users: save the blue ring and use your own trash bags,” he wrote. “We’ve saved a lot of money with this one!”

Lawyer told HuffPost he has an 11-month-old daughter named Charlotte and first discovered this hack when she was about 3 months old ― when they first ran out of refills.

Though some Reddit…

Seabirds use preening to decide how to divvy up parenting duties

Common murres
FAMILY AFFAIR Common murres take turns brooding their chick and foraging for fish. Preening each other acts as a health check and way to negotiate parental duties if one bird is in poorer condition, new research suggests.

Seabirds called common murres appear to use preening as a way to negotiate whose turn it is to watch their chick and who must find food. And when one parent is feeling foul, irregularities in this grooming ritual may send the other a signal that all is not well, researchers report in the July issue of The Auk: Ornithological Advances.

“The fascinating part of this study is the inference that communication between mates allows murres to negotiate the level of effort that each member of the pair puts into the breeding effort,” says John Piatt, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Anchorage, Alaska. “Reproductive success of this species requires a high degree of cooperation by each mate as they switch duties.”

Common murres (Uria aalge) lay only one egg each breeding season. Parental roles aren’t determined by gender for the birds; mothers and fathers take turns watching over their chick and foraging for fish. When one parent returns with a fish for the chick, the couple preen each other and switch roles. This swapping ceremony typically happens three to four times a day.

But study coauthor Carolyn Walsh noticed that switches don’t always go smoothly. Video of 16 pairs of murres, documenting a total of 198 role swaps, showed that sometimes both birds appeared indecisive. Each…

Can You Take Time Off to Raise a Family Without Ruining Your Career?

In an ideal world, you would really be able to “have it all.” You know, the perfect parent with a model career, which fits neatly alongside family life.

The reality is, though, that parents often feel like they’re under pressure from all directions. Naturally, you want to do the best for your children and support your family unit. Oftentimes, this means one parent taking a break from their career, dedicating their time instead to raising a family. Many of us worry about the impact this decision will have on our long term career, and whether we’ll ever be able to pick up where we left off.

Taking time out for family doesn’t have to negatively affect your career path. But there are some considerations — and some smart steps to take — to ensure that you can still access the roles you want when you’re ready to reenter the workforce.

Here are some ideas to get you thinking.

Plan your time out or risk resenting it

There are pros and cons to taking time out of your career to raise your family. You might worry about slowing your career progression, but it’s also common to find yourself missing adult company when you’re at home most of the day. Of course, that’s without even considering the financial impact of losing pay, pension contributions, and other benefits.

Whatever you do, there will be some impact on your career if you take time out. For many people, the benefits of spending time at home far outweigh the potential pitfalls. However, it’s a big decision, and more likely to pay off if you plan for the time in advance.

You should think through the financial impacts. Also plan how you’ll balance your varied roles as a parent, a partner, and an adult in your own right. Keep a flexible mindset if you can. Each individual and family unit will have a unique way of organizing life. If you decide to take time off work, but ultimately the arrangement doesn’t suit you, have a backup plan so you don’t feel trapped.

You risk long-term damage — not only of your career, but of your personal confidence — if you end up resenting your time spent out of the workforce.

Avoid missing professional development opportunities

Time out of work can cause you to fall behind your peers in terms of professional development, or lose track of the latest changes in your field of work. As well as making it more difficult to reintegrate into your previous job, this can damage your confidence… you may feel like the world is moving on without you.

However, it’s not inevitable. You can still take advantage of professional development opportunities when you’re staying home, if you plan carefully. In some cases you might be able to formally arrange to spend some time in the office, to maintain relationships and undergo any necessary training. In the UK, these (paid) days are known as “keep in touch” days. However, even if there is no formal arrangement for doing this, it’s worth talking to your boss about setting something similar up, if you can…