Pizza

Florida Man Is Banned From Ordering Pizza After Being Arrested For Prank Calls

Adults who make crank calls once in a while are just playing around, but an adult who uses five different phone lines to crank call pizza joints on a daily basis for three weeks straight is has a real problem with pizza!

The scraggly man in the photo above is Randy Riddle from Sebastian, Florida, and he has been convicted of crank calling several pizza parlors in his town to the point of felony harassment:

Over three weeks…

Morning Cup of Links: The Pineapple Pizza Incident

The Pineapple Pizza Scandal was Nearly an International Incident Between Canada and Iceland. It’s a good thing the president of Iceland clarified his remarks.
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Strange Connections: Rosa Parks and the Founder of Little Caesars Pizza

Everyone knows the story of how Rosa Parks refused to sit in the back of the bus and became a civil rights icon in the 1950s. What you might not know, however, is that when she was 81 years old, she was robbed and assaulted in her Detroit, Michigan home.

Afterward, federal judge and fellow civil rights activist Damon Keith looked hard to find the elderly woman an apartment in the city where she would feel safe.

Iceland’s President Would Ban Pineapple Pizza if He Could

The president of Iceland has very strong feelings about pizza toppings. On a recent visit to a high school, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson told students that he firmly opposes pineapple as a pizza topping, according to Iceland Magazine.

At the end of his visit to a high school in Akureyri, Jóhannesson opened up a Q&A session with students, which predictably turned into a discussion on topics like professional soccer and pizza. One student asked how he felt about pineapples as a pizza topping, and Jóhannesson…

5 of the Most Expensive Pizzas Ever Made

Taking a break from the usual chain restaurant pizzas and paying for a pie that’s a little more decadent could leave you crying into your wallet. This week, to coincide with International Margarita Day (which is tomorrow—mark your calendars), New York City’s Bodega Negra has partnered with Patrón to create the Platinum Margarita Margherita Pizza, a $500 pie covered in glazed lobster, mango, Osetra caviar, black truffles, and avocado. But there’s a big difference between a $40 gourmet pie—and a $12,000 one. Beware: Truffles ahead!

The Pizza Royale 007 has only been made once—in 2007—and it’s easy to understand why. Created to raise funds for the Fred Hollows Foundation, which was set up to prevent curable blindness in developing countries, the pizza was bought for a whopping £2150 (about $2700) at a charity auction by lawyer Maurizio Morelli as a Valentine’s Day gift for his wife, Sabrina.

Award-winning restaurateur Domenico Crolla flew from Glasgow to Rome to prepare the pizza, which was topped with edible gold, cognac-marinated lobster, medallions of venison, Scottish smoked salmon, and champagne-soaked caviar.

“This is the perfect romantic Valentine’s gift,” Crolla said at the time. “We Italians are experts at amore and I think this pizza will show that the way to a woman’s heart is definitely through her stomach.”

2. GORDON RAMSAY’S MAZE PIZZA

While the basic cost of Gordon Ramsay’s £100 ($125) pizza—which is covered with white truffle paste, fontina cheese, pancetta, cep mushrooms, onion puree, and mizuna lettuce and sold at the foul-mouthed chef’s Maze restaurant in London’s Grosvenor Square—doesn’t come close to the price tag of the 007, the final tally can rise, based on your taste for truffles. What makes this particular pizza so expensive is that it’s topped…

Domino’s Launches a Wedding Registry for Pizza-Loving Couples

If you believe the foundation of a strong marriage is a shared love of pizza, Domino’s has good news: The chain has unveiled a wedding registry that swaps out stuffy silverware for Domino’s eGift cards.

Engaged couples can register at dominosweddingregistry.com to receive an array of pizza gift packages. Wedding guests can select the “2 a.m. Bachelor Party Feast” to treat the groom before his big day, or the “Dancing with My Slice”…

Get to Know Rose Totino, Patron Genius of Frozen Pizza

We don’t like to presume, but the chances are fairly good that you have a pizza in your freezer right now. After all, roughly two-thirds of all American households have at least one frozen pizza lurking in their freezer, according to industry reports, and sales of frozen and refrigerated pizza top more than $5.5 billion each year, shifting upwards of 350 million pies annually.

And you’ve really got one woman to thank for that: Rose Totino, the apple-cheeked second-generation Italian nonna with a serious head for business.

Rose Totino née Cruciani was born in 1915, the fourth of seven children; her parents had come to America from Italy just five years before, in 1910. She grew up in the Northeast neighborhood of Minneapolis, Minnesota, a lively European immigrant community, in a house with chickens and a sustenance garden in the backyard. Like other children in poor families, she started working at an early age, before leaving school at 16 to take a job cleaning houses for $2.50 a week. But even as a teenager, Rose had spirit: According to one story, retold in the Twin Cities Daily Planet, she took on Minneapolis Mayor George Leach to get her father’s city job back after he’d been fired for not being a “full-fledged citizen”.

Her life changed when she attended a dance party at the Viking Dance Hall in Minneapolis. It was there that Rose met Jim, a baker with, like Rose, no more than a 10th grade education. When they started courting, she was earning 37 cents an hour at a local candy factory, but Rose left work when the couple married in 1934. Two daughters soon followed and the Totinos settled into domestic life. Rose became a den mother to a Cub Scout troop, often treating the boys to little homemade pies topped with cinnamon and sugar, and volunteered at her daughters’ school, joining the PTA. Through the 1940s, she frequently attended PTA meetings armed with what soon became her famous pizzas, delicious pies topped with sausage, cheese and fresh sauces, the kinds of pies that she’d grown up eating herself.

Sugary pies for small boys and hearty Italian fare for PTA meetings soon turned into catering events for friends and acquaintances; as word got out about the Totinos’ fantastic cooking, more and more people told them that they really ought to open a restaurant. So they did. By the 1950s, when the Totinos began exploring the idea of starting their own restaurant, pizza had already been in American for at least 50 years, carried over with the waves of Italian immigrants. But it had also stayed largely in Italian communities and in cities such as New York and Chicago; for most of America, pizza was still new, exotic fare that appealed to an increasing interest in “ethnic” cuisine. And in Minnesota, people had barely even heard of pizza – the story goes that when the Totinos applied to the bank for a loan (using their car as collateral), the members of the loan committee had no idea what pizza was, let alone why you’d want to open a restaurant to serve it. So Rose baked them a pie – and got the $1,500 loan they needed to open Totino’s Italian Kitchen.

Rose and Jim opened the restaurant, then a take-out only establishment in 1951 at Central and East Hennepin Avenue, in the Northeast community they’d grown up in. Rose had figured that selling 25 pizzas per week would just about cover the rent, but within three weeks, the Totinos were making enough for Jim to quit his regular job as a baker and go into the pizza business full time. Jim made the crusts, Rose handled the toppings and sauce, and everything went into their custom brick ovens.

The Totinos sometimes worked as long as 18 hours a day, so exhausted at the end of the night that they barely had the energy to stuff their earned bills into…

How Much Sugar Do You Think Is in Your Pizza?

As researchers and nutrition experts begin to discoverand admit—how bad sugar is for the body, there’s more awareness of just how much sugar is contained in some of our favorite foods, even the ones that we think of as savory, not sweet. As Co.Exist reports, Antonio Rodríguez Estrada’s photography project sinAzucar (“sugar free”) aims to illustrate how much sugar is in the food we eat in a way that people understand—with sugar cubes.

Each cube is worth 4 grams of sugar. The World Health Organization and other experts recommend that you only eat about 25 grams of added sugar a day, by some counts. Some health groups allow for a little more, like the UK’s National Health Service (30 grams) or the FDA’s proposed 50 gram maximum—which may or may not have been influenced by the powerful Sugar Lobby, which has fought anti-sugar research for decades, including opposing the new “added sugars” designation on nutrition labels. From a health standpoint, the less sugar, the better. Ideally, you should really only be eating a little more than six sugar cubes over the course of your day. Some of Estrada’s photographs show more than that in just one food.

Depressing as they are, some of the images are pretty obvious. Four Chips Ahoy! cookies (if you can manage to eat…