Plastic bottle

This Refugee Is Building Homes Out Of Plastic Bottles

In a refugee camp in the Sahara desert, one man is making homes more durable in the face of tough weather conditions ― and he’s using trash to do it.

Tateh Lehbib Breica, a Sahrawi refugee living in a camp in Tindouf, Algeria, is building homes for other refugees out of plastic bottles filled with sand, according to the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) video above that was posted last week.

Breica lives in Awserd refugee camp, one of five camps around Tindouf where Sahrawi refugees have lived for over 40 years, according to a January UNHCR post. Thousands of Sahrawi people, an indigenous group of the Western Sahara, were displaced to Algeria in 1975 during the Western Sahara War, and many have remained there since, according to the BBC.

Today, the desert climate in Tindouf ― including storms, heavy rains, and temperatures of up to 113 degrees ― often causes damage to refugees’ homes, which are either tents or made out of adobe mud brick, according to UNHCR’s video.

One storm in 2015, for instance, destroyed thousands of homes in the area.

Breica’s plastic bottle homes make for a more durable structure than adobe when it comes to fighting heavy rains, reports UNHCR. The circular shape also makes them aerodynamic, which helps to withstand storms.

“We spend months building the other fragile dwelling,” Mailaminin Saleh, a refugee who currently lives in one of Breica’s plastic bottle houses,

This Refugee Is Building Homes Out Of Plastic Bottles

In a refugee camp in the Sahara desert, one man is making homes more durable in the face of tough weather conditions ― and he’s using trash to do it.

Tateh Lehbib Breica, a Sahrawi refugee living in a camp in Tindouf, Algeria, is building homes for other refugees out of plastic bottles filled with sand, according to the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) video above that was posted last week.

Breica lives in Awserd refugee camp, one of five camps around Tindouf where Sahrawi refugees have lived for over 40 years, according to a January UNHCR post. Thousands of Sahrawi people, an indigenous group of the Western Sahara, were displaced to Algeria in 1975 during the Western Sahara War, and many have remained there since, according to the BBC.

Today, the desert climate in Tindouf ― including storms, heavy rains, and temperatures of up to 113 degrees ― often causes damage to refugees’ homes, which are either tents or made out of adobe mud brick, according to UNHCR’s video.

One storm in 2015, for instance, destroyed thousands of homes in the area.

Breica’s plastic bottle homes make for a more durable structure than adobe when it comes to fighting heavy rains, reports UNHCR. The circular shape also makes them aerodynamic, which helps to withstand storms.

“We spend months building the other fragile dwelling,” Mailaminin Saleh, a refugee who currently lives in one of Breica’s plastic bottle houses,

These Blobs May Be the Future of Plastic Water Bottles

These funny looking globs might spell the end of plastic bottles polluting the ocean.

The Ooho! is an “edible water bottle” made entirely out of sustainable packaging.

Designed by London-based startup Skipping Rocks Labs, the biodegradable container is made out of a thin, flexible membrane comprised of sodium alginate – a natural derivative of brown algae – and calcium chloride. It can be either ripped open, allowing the individual to drink the liquid out of the membrane, or simply consumed whole.

Each glob contains 250 ml each, costing only about 2 cents to make.

RELATED: Man Creates ‘Shoes That Grow’ So Poor Kids Don’t Outgrow Them

Skipping Rocks already designed the Ooho! in 2014,…