Public health

Why This Australian Dog Sits on the Board of 7 Scientific Journals

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We rely on the peer-review process to make sure that published studies have scientific merit. But this approach is not nearly as foolproof as it needs to be, as evidenced by the case of an Australian dog named Ollie. The Staffordshire terrier actually goes by Dr. Olivia Doll, when she’s not out chasing her own tail. That’s the name under which the dog sits on the board of seven international medical journals. And just recently, Dr. Doll, the dog, was asked to review a paper on how to manage tumors.

The dog’s academic career was created by Professor Mike Daube from Curtin University, a public health expert in Perth. He wanted to expose the predatory practices of some scientific magazines, which charge fees and do not go through a rigorous vetting process, looking to take advantage of researchers.

Indeed, it’s hard to believe that Ollie’s fake credentials, like past work at the Shenton Park Institute for Canine Refugee Studies, passed muster….

Virus That Caused a State of Emergency in Brazil is Now Cut by 95%

Due to almost a full elimination of recorded Zika cases, Brazil has just announced on Thursday that the virus is no longer an official public health crises.

Zika wasn’t connected as the cause of microcephaly until 2015, when the government recognized the virus as a full-on epidemic. Microcephaly, which is shown to cause birth defects, an enlarged head, and stunted speech in newborns, affected thousands of children after the initial outbreak.

According to Brazil’s Ministry of Health, there have been 95% less reported Zika cases in the country during 2017, as opposed to 2016. Sources say that there have only been 7,900 reported cases between January and April of this year, as opposed to…

New York’s Trans Fat Ban Reduced Heart Attacks and Strokes

Banning trans-fatty acids had a measurable impact on public health in the state of New York, according to a new study recently highlighted by Popular Science. A review of New York State Department of Public Health data from 2002 to 2013, published in the JAMA Cardiology, finds that there were 6.2 percent fewer hospital visits related to heart attacks and strokes in counties that banned foods that contained trans-fatty acids (trans fats) compared to counties that didn’t have a ban in place.

In 2007, New York City, which has five counties, became the first U.S. metro area to ban trans fats in restaurants, bakeries, and other eateries. Six other counties in New York state followed suit over the subsequent five years. Trans fats in foods like Twinkies, Girl Scout Cookies, coffee creamers, and microwave popcorn typically come from partially hydrogenated oils, which have been found to increase the risk of stroke, heart disease, and more. The bans did not apply to packaged food, so people in those 11 counties likely still had some trans fats in their diets, but nonetheless were eating…

Rules restricting artificial trans fats are good for heart health

side of fries and oils
Starting in 2007, areas of New York restricted the use of partially hydrogenated oils in eateries, eliminating artificial trans fats from foods like these french fries. As a result, residents experienced fewer heart attacks and strokes, a new study suggests.

OIL OPT OUT

Taking artificial trans fats off the menu reduces hospitalizations for heart attack and stroke, suggests a study that examined what happened after several areas in New York restricted the fats’ use. The findings portend larger scale public health benefits after a nationwide ban on artificial trans fats begins in the United States in 2018.

Hospital admission rates for heart attacks declined 7.8 percent more in New York counties that restricted trans fats than in those counties that had not, researchers report online April 12 in JAMA Cardiology.

“This is the first study that links a trans fats ban to a reduction in heart disease and stroke in large populations,” says nutritional epidemiologist Frank Hu of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “The evidence from this study indicates that implementation of a nationwide ban on trans fats will reduce heart disease and save many lives in the United States.”

Heart disease causes one in every four deaths in the United States. Coronary heart disease, the most common kind, kills more than 370,000 people each year. Past research finds that eating foods containing artificial trans fats, also called trans-fatty acids, increases the risk of coronary heart disease. Among other effects, consuming these fats leads to higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or “bad” cholesterol, a component of artery-clogging plaque. Artificial,…

Rules restricting artificial trans fats are good for heart health

side of fries and oils
Starting in 2007, areas of New York restricted the use of partially hydrogenated oils in eateries, eliminating artificial trans fats from foods like these french fries. As a result, residents experienced fewer heart attacks and strokes, a new study suggests.

OIL OPT OUT

Taking artificial trans fats off the menu reduces hospitalizations for heart attack and stroke, suggests a study that examined what happened after several areas in New York restricted the fats’ use. The findings portend larger scale public health benefits after a nationwide ban on artificial trans fats begins in the United States in 2018.

Hospital admission rates for heart attacks declined 7.8 percent more in New York counties that restricted trans fats than in those counties that had not, researchers report online April 12 in JAMA Cardiology.

“This is the first study that links a trans fats ban to a reduction in heart disease and stroke in large populations,” says nutritional epidemiologist Frank Hu of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “The evidence from this study indicates that implementation of a nationwide ban on trans fats will reduce heart disease and save many lives in the United States.”

Heart disease causes one in every four deaths in the United States. Coronary heart disease, the most common kind, kills more than 370,000 people each year. Past research finds that eating foods containing artificial trans fats, also called trans-fatty acids, increases the risk of coronary heart disease. Among other effects, consuming these fats leads to higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or “bad” cholesterol, a component of artery-clogging plaque. Artificial,…