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Desert Facts – 75 Interesting Facts About The Desert

desert facts

Desert facts: Interesting facts about deserts. Desert biome is an ecosystem that receives minimal rainfall. While hot, dry deserts of Africa are the most popular, cold deserts for instance Antarctica is the largest desert on Earth. There are four types of deserts namely hot and dry, semiarid, coastal, and cold. Life in a desert is not easy, yet many animals and plants thrive in these extreme conditions. Let’s explore more interesting facts about deserts.

Desert facts

Desert can be found in every continent except Europe.

Large mineral deposits are often found in deserts.

Many desert animals are nocturnal i.e. they sleep during the day and come out at night as the temperatures at night are more tolerable.

Desert is formed when the mountains along the edge of the desert stop the rain from getting there.

As body fat retains heat, most desert animals adapt in such a way that they store all their fat in one area in their body. Camel stores all its body fat in its hump.

Antarctica is the world’s largest desert.

70% of Australia is classified as semi-arid, arid or desert.

Australia is the driest inhabited continent on Earth.

Atacama Desert is the largest natural supplier of Sodium Nitrate.

One third of the earth surface is covered in deserts.

Desert biome facts

Sand from the Sahara is blown to Amazon Rainforest along with the wind. It actually fertilizes at the rainforest.

Antarctica is the largest cold desert on Earth.

In six hours world’s deserts receive more energy form the sun than humans consume in a year.

Sahara is the largest hot desert on Earth.

Atacama Desert is home to the largest ground telescope in the world, ALMA.

Desert actually means an abandoned place.

20% of the Earth’s desert is covered in sand.

There are polar deserts in Arctic and Antarctic. It is a region free of ice.

A desert is an area that receives the lowest rainfall.

Deserts receive less than 40 cm of rainfall in a year.

Facts about the desert

Gobi desert in Asia is very cold.

Temperature at Sahara desert can reach up to 122 degrees Fahrenheit.

Google hires a camel to get the street view of the desert.

Every year about 46,000 square miles of…

15 Facts About Winter Weather

The start of the winter season is marked by holiday carolers, hot cocoa, and in some parts of the world, blustery weather. Whether you enjoy bundling up in your coziest gear or are already counting down the days until spring, here are 15 facts about what’s happening outdoors this time of year.

1. IT SOMETIMES SNOWS WHERE YOU LEAST EXPECT IT.

You wouldn’t be shocked to see snow on the ground of Siberia or Minnesota when traveling to those places during the winter months. But northern areas don’t have a monopoly on snowfall—the white stuff has been known to touch down everywhere from the Sahara Desert to Hawaii. Even the driest place on Earth isn’t immune. In 2011, the Atacama Desert in Chile received nearly 32 inches of snow thanks to a rare cold front from Antarctica.

2. SNOWFLAKES COME IN ALL SIZES.

The average snowflake ranges from a size slightly smaller than a penny to the width of a human hair. But according to some unverified sources they can grow much larger. Witnesses of a snowstorm in Fort Keogh, Montana in 1887 claimed to see milk-pan sized crystals fall from the sky. If true that would make them the largest snowflakes ever spotted, at around 15 inches wide.

3. A LITTLE WATER CAN ADD UP TO A LOT OF SNOW.

The air doesn’t need to be super moist to produce impressive amounts of snow. Unlike plain rainfall, a bank of fluffy snow contains lots of air that adds to its bulk. That’s why what would have been an inch of rain in the summer equals about 10 inches of snow in the colder months.

4. YOU CAN HEAR THUNDERSNOW WHEN THE CONDITIONS ARE RIGHT.

If you’ve ever heard the unmistakable rumble of thunder in the middle of a snowstorm, that’s not your ears playing tricks on you. It’s likely thundersnow, a rare winter weather phenomenon that’s most common near lakes. When relatively warm columns of air rise from the ground and form turbulent storm clouds in the sky in the winter, there’s potential for thundersnow. A few more factors are still necessary for it to occur, namely air that’s warmer than the cloud cover above it and wind that pushes the warm air upwards. Even then it’s entirely possible to miss thundersnow when it happens right over your head: Lightning is harder to see in the winter and the snow sometimes dampens the thunderous sound.

5. SNOW FALLS AT 1 TO 6 FEET PER SECOND.

At least in the case of snowflakes with broad structures, which act as parachutes. Snow that falls in the form of pellet-like graupel travels to Earth at a much faster rate.

6. IT DOESN’T TAKE LONG FOR THE TEMPERATURE TO DROP.

Don’t take mild conditions in the…