Recipe

The Grown-Up Kitchen: How to Time Your Cooking So Everything Is Ready at Once

Photo by Damian Siwiaszczyk.

When preparing a “square” meal—you know, the kind with a protein and at least two sides—I rarely struggle with the actual cooking. I can cook a chicken, mash some potatoes, and roast a sheet pan of broccoli without any issue, but timing it all so everything ends up on the table simultaneously—hot and ready—is what gives me trouble.

I’ve been cooking for a long time, and even I struggle with timing, particularly when working with new foods or recipes. The more cooking you do, the more intuitive timing becomes, but it can still be overwhelming. Given the fact that there are an infinite number of combinations of an infinite number of recipes, it’s hard to right a Complete Definitive End-All Guide on the subject, but I can give you some basic tips and guidelines for streamlining and timing a meal that all comes together at once. Spoiler alert: it involves a fair amount of planning.

Step One: Make Good Choices and Keep Things Simple

Photo by baron valium

Everyone loves a new and exciting recipe, but making a new dish for the first time almost always takes longer than you expect. Whether you’re learning how to break down a new vegetable, working with a new piece of meat, or trying an entirely new cooking method, it’s going to take longer than the estimated recipe time. You should give yourself an extra 15 minutes of cooking and prep time to account for this, but you should also make sure that the other dishes you’re preparing are things you’re familiar with.

Also, don’t go crazy with the menu. Know what you’re going to make ahead of time and stick to it, and resist the urge to make absolutely everything yourself. Yes, you can make your own salad dressing, but rifling through the fridge to find mustard, vinegar, and half a shallot you saw somewhere in there earlier this week can add time and distract you from the rest of the meal prep. You’ve already washed, chopped, and tossed all the components to make a nice, fresh salad, and no one is going to be mad if you plunk a couple of bottles of olive oil and vinegar down instead of whipping up a vinaigrette.

In terms of how many components your meal should have, that depends on you and your comfort level. For a weeknight meal, I tend to stick to a protein, a cooked veg or starch, and something made of raw plant parts (when tomatoes are in season, I just slice them and sprinkle them with salt for the easiest side ever), but there’s nothing wrong with serving a single side, or—in the case of soups, stews, and casseroles—a good piece of bread. No matter how many you choose, it’s important that you stick to your choices. Once that’s done, you’re ready to plan your attack.

Step Two: Make a Timeline

Photo by Rebecca Siegel.

First, decide on when dinner is going to be served, and work backwards from there. Write down everything you’re making, with recipe times and cooking temperatures beside each item. If you’re not working from a recipe, a quick Google search can usually reveal this information. If you just want to roast some vegetables, it sure helps to have a handle on how quickly different types of vegetables roast. Below are some general roasting times for cooking vegetables in a 425-degree oven, but keep in mind that these can be affected by how small you cut them up:

  • Thin and soft vegetables: (Yellow squash, zucchini, peppers, green beans, asparagus, tomatoes) 10-20 minutes
  • Greens: (Kale, mustard greens, collard greens) 6-10…

Update Your Picnic Menu With This Recipe Book

Why settle for potato salad and sandwiches at your next picnic when you can up the ante with elaborate entrees like pistachio meringues and prawn cakes? In A Moveable Feast, food stylist Katy Holder cooks up unconventional dishes that will make it to your picnic site in one piece and that are perfect for outside feasts.

You can get the whole book of recipes on Amazon now, and check out a few of Holder’s creations with her descriptions below.

CHICKEN AND PORK PICNIC PIE

“This is a rich savory pie, the kind we used to take on picnics in England. It’s made up of layers of poached chicken, sausage meat and a bacon-and-sweet-corn stuffing, all encased in a delicious shortcrust pastry. For added flavor, I use sausage meat from sausages, rather than plain sausage meat.”

ITALIAN DELI-STUFFED LOAF

“Instead of making six separate sandwiches, make one large filled loaf and then slice it to serve —…

9 Surprising Uses for Peeps

You can eat marshmallow Peeps, and you can put them in someone’s Easter basket. But that’s just the beginning of what you can do with those small blobs of sugary goodness. Branch out and use your Peeps in new ways this year.

1. S’MORES

Peeps are marshmallows, and can be toasted over a campfire just like their plain, non-sugar-coated brothers—which means you can make classic S’mores out of them. Best of all: you don’t even need a campfire to do it. Serious Eats has a recipe for them that they call S’meeps, which only requires that you pop them in the oven for a short time. If you’re a Peeps purist, forget the graham crackers and chocolate and enjoy the unique taste of campfire-toasted Peeps all by themselves.

2. WREATHS

Vanessa Brady at Tried & True has made several Peeps wreaths that are sure to inspire you to do the same. (She even has a tutorial to get you started.)

3. PEEPS-KABOBS

If you want to trick a kid into eating a fruit salad, just serve it up on a stick—with a marshmallow Peep in the middle. Blogger Melodramatic Mom made these for an irresistible after-school snack for her kids.

4. ART SUPPLIES

With their consistent shape and size, and variety of bright colors, Peeps can be used as pixels…

Celebrate Grilled Cheese Day With a Whole Book of Ooey, Gooey Recipes

Happy Grilled Cheese Day! On this sacred day, it’s tradition to celebrate with a hot pressed sandwich oozing with cheese. While it’s hard to top the classic American-cheese-and-white-bread version, many intrepid chefs have put their own creative spins on the often simple (but never boring) sandwich. Since the only musts are bread and cheese, you can add pretty much anything else you want. If that’s got you feeling overwhelmed, fear not: Melts by…

Cooking More at Home Is About Developing Systems, Not Memorizing Recipes

The recipe community makes it seem like one-and-done type meals are the pinnacle of home cooking. And if you crack open a cookbook or browse a few food blogs, that’s mostly what you’ll see. But for people who don’t already have experience in the kitchen, this is wildly inefficient.

Say you want to cook a typical, single-meal recipe you found for dinner. Think about that process for minute. You have to decide on the recipe, stop at the store on your way home from work, pick out all the ingredients you need (because that great-looking recipe always has a few secret, fancy ingredients you don’t have at home), then drive home and finally cook it.

Sure, meal-kit services like Blue Apron and Hello Fresh can ease some…

Save Time and Money With These 15 Delicious Sheet Pan Meals

Feel like you’re constantly stuck in a dinner rut? Don’t turn into the drive-thru lane again for a quick dinner solution. Instead, use sheet pan meals to cook a delicious dinner, all in one pan.

The best part about sheet pan meals is that there are endless options. Below are 15 recipes, but feel free to tweak them to your desire. These meals are practically foolproof. (See also: 10 One Pot Meals That Will Transform Dinner)

1. Ultimate Chicken Nachos

Nachos can’t really be dinner, can they? You bet they can, and your family will love you for it. Spread an overlapping layer of chips on your metal sheet pan, then top with grated cheese, cooked chicken pieces, diced tomatoes, corn kernels, and canned pinto or black beans. You can even add sliced jalapeños if you’d like.

Bake at 400º for 10 to 15 minutes. Immediately sprinkle chopped cilantro on the finished chips. Top with your favorite wet ingredients (sour cream, guacamole, salsa, etc.) and enjoy!

2. Ratatouille

You won’t miss the meat in this dish. Use a mandolin or vegetable slicer to save time. Cut Yukon potatoes, zucchinis, yellow squash, and eggplant into small coin shapes. Next, open a can of tomato puree and add a thin layer on your sheet pan. Season with salt, then arrange the sliced vegetables in an overlapping fashion. Drizzle the vegetables with olive oil and season with salt, pepper, and Italian seasoning.

Bake the ratatouille for 35 minutes in a 375º oven. Sprinkle with goat cheese and serve with crusty bread for a complete meal.

3. Lemon Garlic Salmon and Green Beans

Baking salmon on top of green beans, or a vegetable with a similar cooking time, makes for a yummy, heart-healthy meal.

Layer the green beans on a nonstick sheet pan. In a small bowl, mix ½ cup of olive oil, the juice of two lemons, a dash of salt, pepper, Parmesan cheese, and Italian seasoning. Dip the salmon fillets in the oil mixture and then lay them skin side up on the green beans.

Broil on high for eight to 10 minutes. Make sure the oven is fully hot before sticking your fish in, and check the fish at the eight-minute mark. It should flake easily with a fork.

4. Cilantro Lime Chicken Fajitas

Cut raw chicken breasts, onions, and bell peppers into strips. In a bag or bowl, mix ½ cup of oil, ¼ cup lime juice, finely chopped cilantro, and a packet of taco seasoning….