Sampling (music)

How to Improve Handwriting Recognition on Your Windows 10 PC

Windows 10 lets you use handwriting input in any application, and many applications include full support for inking. Windows automatically attempts to learn your unique handwriting style when you write with a pen, but you can also train it manually to improve the system’s handwriting recognition.

“Windows© Update” Repair
Follow These Simple Steps. Fast, 2 Minute Repair (Recommended) Go to defender-pro.com/Repair

Turn Automatic Learning On or Off

Automatic learning is enabled by default. To check whether it’s still enabled, , click the “Advanced settings” link at the left pane of the Control Panel > Clock, Language, and Region > Language window. Under Personalization data, ensure the option is set to “Use automatic learning (recommended)” so the system automatically attempts to learn your handwriting.

As this interface notes, all this data is stored on your PC and no information is sent to Microsoft when you use automatic learning. Windows won’t do as good a job of recognizing your handwriting if you select “Don’t use automatic learning and delete all previously collected data”.

Train Windows 10’s Handwriting Recognition

This option is still available in the old Control Panel interface. To find it, head to Control Panel > Clock, Language, and Region > Language. Click the “Options” button to the right of the language you use.

Click “Personalize handwriting recognition” under Handwriting to…

Freezer Malfunction Melts Precious Arctic Ice Samples

When your freezer breaks down, you might lose some leftovers or a box of your favorite popsicles. But when a scientist’s freezer malfunctions, the world stands to lose thousands of years’ worth of stored history. That’s what happened last week, when an equipment failure at the University of Alberta (UAB) melted ancient samples of Arctic ice.

An ice core is kind of like the vertical equivalent of a tree’s rings. The gas bubbles, sediment, and chemicals trapped in each of its many layers tell a story about the world at that particular moment in time.

UAB’s Canadian Ice Core Archive holds 12 cores—nearly 1 mile of ice—representing roughly 80,000 years of our planet’s history. Some of the samples have been in storage since the 1970s. Many of them are now considerably smaller than they were a few weeks ago.

Each long,…