Sleep deprivation

Say Goodbye to Sleepless Nights! 10 Essential Oils That Help You Sleep Soundly.

I can vividly recall all those sleepless nights where I was unable to sleep due to pressure from the work, family and a general deterioration in health. Sleep is an important part of our health mechanism but most of us find it extremely difficult to sleep due to stress and pressures of the life.

Long commute times, eating and drinking late in the night, consuming caffeine, failing to deliver on time and thinking about our next meeting are all the factors most of us face every day.

The result of this stress is lack of sleep or quality sleep.

Not being able to fall asleep leads to increased stress levels and bad moods. Taking medication for sleep comes with its own share of side effects.

So, if you’re looking for a healthy way of promoting sleep you should opt for essential oils.

When all else methods fail to help you have a good sleep, try essential oils.

My own personal experience with lack of sleep pushed me to research and find new ways of hacking the sleep. I read almost every good quality book on how to hack the sleep and get sufficient and refreshing sleep during the night.

I tried from meditation, hypnosis, using special sleep curtains to darkening rooms to pitch black. Though almost every method worked but what I found more refreshing and relaxing was the use of oils for sleep.

So if you do not want to use any medication, listen to hours of sleep music, here are some tips for you to use some essential oils for having a good quality sleep:

Let’s get your bedroom ready for a good quality sleep!

Before using any oil, it is important to find a best oil essential oil diffuser.1

Setting up the environment through a good quality essential oil diffuser is important because it can detox the room environment and add more aroma and…

A New Study Suggests A Lack of Sleep Makes Your Brain Eat Itself

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Weird, shape-shifting glial cells are your brain’s caretakers. They’re the first responders in the event of a head injury, and — having colonized every nook and cranny of the place while you were still in the womb — they’re your cranial custodians. These tentacled helpers clear out the junk and are vital to keeping your brain smoothly humming along. But now a new study has discovered something startling about them: they eat healthy brain cells in mice who don’t get enough shut-eye. And maybe in us, too.

  • astrocytes are like gardeners for your neural synapses, pruning away bits you don’t use to continually keep your wiring tidy and efficient.
  • microglial cells are the garbage collectors, constantly on the lookout for used-up cells and other stuff that could get in the way.

There were three groups of mice in the study. The first group could sleep as long as they wanted, the second group was kept awake an extra eight hours before being allowed to sleep, and the third were kept away for five days to mimic chronic sleep loss. The researchers found that both kinds of glial cells put in destructive overtime in tired mice’s brains.

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In the group of well-rested mice, astrocytes were seen to be active in about 6% of a mouse’s synapses….

Long naps lead to less night sleep for toddlers

toddler napping
SNOOZE NOW OR LATER Late afternoon naps can push back bedtime, but naps probably don’t affect the total amount of sleep a toddler gets in a 24-hour period, a study suggests.

Like most moms and dads, my time in the post-baby throes of sleep deprivation is a hazy memory. But I do remember feeling instant rage upon hearing a popular piece of advice for how to get my little one some shut-eye: “sleep begets sleep.” The rule’s reasoning is unassailable: To get some sleep, my baby just had to get some sleep. Oh. So helpful. Thank you, lady in the post office and entire Internet.

So I admit to feeling some satisfaction when I came across a study that found an exception to the “sleep begets sleep” rule. The study quite reasonably suggests there is a finite amount of sleep to be had, at least for the 50 Japanese 19-month-olds tracked by researchers.

The researchers used activity monitors to record a week’s worth of babies’ daytime naps, nighttime sleep and activity patterns. The results, published June 9, 2016, in Scientific Reports, showed…