Spouse

8 Money Moves to Make Before You Remarry

Every year, about three per 1,000 Americans divorce from their spouse. Since about seven per 1,000 Americans marry every year, there is a chance that some divorcees will eventually tie the knot again with a new partner.

But before you remarry, you should evaluate your finances. Let’s review eight money moves that will set you both up for financial safety and success.

1. Make Amendments to Your Will (or Make One!)

The joy of finding love again can make you look at everything through a rosy filter. While no one likes thinking about their mortality, especially close to a big wedding day, the reality is that not updating your will could leave your new partner (and potential dependents) with a messy court battle for your estate. Review your current will and update it as necessary. For example, you may redistribute your estate to include your new dependents and choose a different executor — a person who will manage your estate and carry out the orders in your will.

If you don’t have a will, then setting one up should become the top priority of all money moves before you remarry. In the absence of a will, a judge will appoint an administrator who will execute your estate according to your state’s probate laws. What is legal may not be the ideal situation for your loved ones, so plan ahead. (See also: What You Need to Know About Writing a Will)

2. Update Beneficiaries Listed on Your Retirement Accounts

Even after setting up or updating your will, you still need to update the list of beneficiaries listed for your retirement accounts. This is particularly important for 401K plan holders. The Employee Retirement Security Act (ERISA) stipulates that a defined contribution plan, such as a 401K, must provide a death benefit to the spouse of the plan holder.

Your beneficiary form is so important that it can supersede your will under many circumstances. When updating your beneficiary form before you remarry, there are three best practices to follow:

  • Get written consent from your previous spouse, if applicable, to make changes;
  • Second, designate only children who are of legal age so they can actually carry out their wishes;
  • Third, find out the tax implications for beneficiaries other than your spouse as a large windfall could unintentionally create a financial burden.

3. Consider Setting Up a Trust

Since we’re talking about potential financial burdens, many of them could come out of an estate with lots of valuable assets being divided among many beneficiaries, many of them very young.

When you have accumulated a lot of wealth over the years, you could be better served by a trust than by a will for several reasons, including keeping your estate out of a court-supervised probate, maintaining the privacy of your records, and allowing you to customize estate distribution. While the cost of setting up a trust can be up to three times that of…

Here’s How Your Taxes Will Change After Marriage

Life tends to get more complicated after marriage. And your taxes are no exception.

Getting married will change the way you file your taxes every April 15. There is good news, though: Many of the changes will be positive ones that can help boost your deductions and save you money.

Let’s look at five of the biggest tax changes you’ll face after the wedding bells stop ringing.

1. Filing Jointly vs. Separately

Once married, couples have to face a big tax decision: Should they file their taxes jointly or separately? In most cases, married couples who file their taxes jointly save more money. But there can be exceptions.

Couples who file their taxes jointly in 2017 will qualify for a standard deduction of $12,700. When married couples file separately, they each can claim a standard deduction of $6,350. Note that if your spouse chooses to instead itemize their deductions, you will have to as well.

Filing jointly makes especially good financial sense for married couples in which one person earns significantly more than the other. The averaging effect of combining two incomes can bring these couples out of higher tax brackets.

When couples file jointly, they might also qualify for several tax credits and deductions that they wouldn’t otherwise get if filing separately. This could include the earned income tax credit, child and dependent care tax credit, American Opportunity Act education credit, and the Lifetime Learning education tax credit. Couples who have adopted might also qualify for adoption tax credits when they file jointly. You also will not be allowed to deduct student loan interest if you and your spouse opt to file separately.

This doesn’t mean that filing jointly is always the right decision for married couples. Say one spouse has significant medical expenses, casualty losses, or miscellaneous itemized deductions. Taxpayers can deduct medical expenses and casualty losses only after they pass 10% of their adjusted gross…