Sugar

Sugar Detox: How To Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth Without Getting Too Much Sugar

Let’s face it, we all love our desserts and we all probably have a favourite one that we simply can’t resist.

The bad news is that there is lots of good information today that warns about the risks of too much sugar. It’s a fact that too much sugar will slowly deteriorate your health. Almost a third of Americans are diabetic and 80% or more of us eat more sugar that is reasonable or healthful. This is not good. So here’s the problem… if you decide to reduce or eliminate sugar, what do you do about desserts?

How To Enjoy Dessert Without Getting Too Much Sugar?

Fortunately, there are sugar free dessert recipes available today that allow you to adopt a sugar-free diet and at the same time make desserts that taste just as good as the not-so-good-for-you ones. They use only sugar free ingredients or sugar substitutes. So if you usually make your own desserts and are looking to cut your sugar intake, then it’s time that you explored some of the sugar free recipes that you can prepare right in your own kitchen.

Here are some tips that will help you make the change and find sugar free dessert that’s just as delicious as those sugar-laden desserts you’re used to.

1. Start with the easy recipes

If you are just beginning to explore the world of sugar free dessert, then pies, muffins and cookies are an excellent place to start. These are easy sugar free desserts to prepare, they take little time to make and just as good as those that have real sugar.

2. Make it a family goal

If you are in a…

Edible Innovations: Dr. Wichelecki Makes Good Sugar

From Singapore to the USA and all around Europe, Edible Innovations profiles food makers that engage in improving the global food system at every stage, from production to distribution to eating and shopping. Join us as we explore the main trends in the industry from a maker perspective. Chiara Cecchini of Food Innovation Program — an ecosystem with a strong educational core that promotes food innovation as a key tool to tackle the great challenges of the future — introduces you to the faces, stories, and experiences of food makers around the globe. Check back on Tuesdays and Thursdays for new installments.

In the United States there are over 29 million people who live with diabetes. Globally there are over 371 million people affected. With the numbers rising for both Type 2 Diabetes and obesity rates worldwide, scientists have begun looking to what people are consuming for the answers to these statistics.

These health issues can be traced back to excessively consuming sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). These two types of sugars have been harshly judged in the media before, and even publicly linked to some serious side effects. This resulted in fad dieting and quite a few individuals deciding to cut sugar from their diets entirely. However, internationally, people still crave the sugars that they are used to eating and cooking with.

Huge amounts of products are distributed and sold daily with sucrose and other sweeteners, and they are almost all very addictive. However, sucrose is not our only option. There are better products for us to consume. Dr. Daniel Wichelecki aims to provide the world with a sugar that is both higher quality and more affordable in comparison to sucrose.

New Research Reveals How Type 2 Diabetes Affects the Brain

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We know what happens to the bodies of people suffering from type 2 diabetes. Your cells cease to respond to the hormone insulin, which is tasked with carrying sugar out of your bloodstream. Your blood sugar levels rise, which causes your pancreas to produce more and more insulin—over time a futile effort. Your pancreas eventually becomes exhausted; your blood sugar remains permanently elevated. The cascade of deleterious health effects ensues, resulting in, if untreated, death.

Sugar is first to mind when contemplating this disease these days, alongside the fact that type 2 diabetes is an avoidable disease. In the three decades following 1975 worldwide rates increased sevenfold. Yet it is not only sugar doing the damage. The accumulation of visceral fat and lack of exercise are also implicated in the onset of diabetes. Over time your chances of heart disease, blindness, and kidney failure increase.

Brain Health Tips from a Nobel Prize-Winning Scientist Eric Kandel

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Brain Health Tips from a Nobel Prize-Winning Scientist

Eric-kandel-hs

Eric Kandel

Professor of Brain Science, Columbia University

07:05

But what is going on in your brain during this process? We know the risk of dementia increases, but why? A new study in the journal Diabetologia addresses this question.

While obesity increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a team led by Dr. Sujung Yoon wanted to know how being overweight affects the brains of those with this form of diabetes. They specifically looked at how the cognitive functions of early-stage patients were affected.

Fifty overweight and fifty normal-weight sufferers between the age of 30…

Eating Trash With Claire: Tomato Skin Salt and Peach Skin Sugar

Photos by Claire Lower

I’m a big fan of repurposing seemingly useless scraps into something surprisingly delicious, which is why I was extremely pleased to stumble upon these recipes for tomato skin salt and peach skin sugar on Food52.

Both tomato skins and peach peels initially seem like a dead-end scrap. They’re flimsy, seemingly lacking in flavor, and kind of weird, texturally speaking. Drying them out and concentrating their flavor for use in a tasty powder seemed like almost too good of a solution, and I knew both of these recipes were something I needed to taste to believe.

This idea is the brain child of Gabrielle Hamilton, and can be found among many other treasures in her cookbook Prune. Tomato skins are one of those scraps I’d never given a second thought to, and I never felt particularly bad about it. They’re such a small part of the tomato,and tossing them didn’t seem like that big of a deal, but I now regret every bit of tomato skin I have ever cast aside, so good is this salt.

The process of turning the red skins into a pretty pink salt is an easy one, but first you have to peel them off the tomato, which is also not that hard if you know how to do it. Just take a pairing knife and make a small “x” on the bottom of the fruit, and dunk it in boiling water for about 30 seconds. Once you see the peel start to pull away slightly from the rest…

Katy Perry’s New Single Is A Smorgasbord Of Awkward Food Euphemisms

Katy Perry is back with a new collaboration.

Katy Perry’s next studio album still doesn’t have a release date, even after TMZ spotted her appearing to tease its debut earlier this month. But we seem to be creeping closer. On Friday, the singer debuted another single, titled “Bon Appetit.”

A few months after her last release, the politically aware “Chained to the Rhythm,” this new collaboration with Migos is actually just one…

Put Down Your Sugary Fizzy Drinks And Get Seltzer Water Instead!

Seltzer Water. You either love it or you hate it. But is it actually good for you? After all, it is water. It just happens to be fizzy. This is the result of carbonation, or the process of pressurizing carbon dioxide gas. It turns out, Seltzer Water does have its pros, but it also has cons; some fizzy water contains carbonic acid (this is what creates the bubbles) that has been rumored to eat away your tooth enamel. But do not misunderstand: if you are choosing between Seltzer and Soda, that acidic water is still going to be a better choice.

How much do Americans spend on soft drinks?

While we all know how expensive our coffee habits can be, it is just as important to monitor what we spend on other things, such as soft drinks. The average American household spends about $850 a year for soft drinks. This adds up to an unbelievable $65 billion on soft drinks alone! Now remember that, on average, a can of soda (12 oz) contains about 39 grams of sugar. Spending billions and billions on soft drinks equates to spending billions and billions on our own poor health and deteriorating teeth.

Why Seltzer is a better choice than Soda?

First, let’s start with sugar. While 12 fluid ounces of soda has nearly 40 grams of sugar, the same amount of Seltzer has 0. There are also zero calories, while soda cannot say the same. It’s also a more economical option. With Americans spending almost $900 a year on soda, Seltzer can help save some of that money for more important things. In fact, Seltzer was first introduced specifically as a cheap alternative to mineral water (more on this later) and is still chosen for its price tag, time after time.

Even if you love regular, non bubbly water, you may find yourself craving the little bubbles found in soft drinks and carbonated water. Some people crave carbonated drinks and immediately grab one without questioning where that craving came from. It turns out, when our bodies want food and our blood sugar is low, our brain signals to us that we want something carbonated because we know it has lots of sugar. However, we would be better off eating something with natural sugar and some fiber , like an orange or even an apple, because it would gradually increase our blood sugar rather than a dangerous spike, and it would fill us up more successfully than all those empty calories. Regardless, if you just can’t shake the craving for a fizzy drink, a clear, bubbly, zero calorie Seltzer would be a better choice than a dark, unhealthy, syrupy soda.

When it comes to the label, Seltzer Water looks exactly like regular bottled water, showing zeros across the board. But if you’re looking for a fizzy water with vitamins, you want to find mineral water.

Sparkling Mineral Water also comes from a natural spring, so it automatically contains various minerals like salts. The bubbles are naturally occurring (unless the specific bottler adds more, such as San Pellegrino). While Seltzer Water can be added to alcohol, think Vodka Soda, Mineral Water would be enjoyed on its own.

Additionally, Mineral Water will give you a little more nutritional bang for your buck . A 6.5 oz of Sparkling Mineral Water has 0 calories and sugars, but contains 2mg of sodium and 26.9 mg of calcium 1.

Why Seltzer Water can be considered as healthy?

While regular water…

10 Utterly Flavorful Drinks You Can Drink All Day And Still Not Gain Weight.

As you embark upon a journey of weight loss you soon discover how many empty calories we all intake, and they don’t always come from food we eat. It can be quite frustrating to realize that no matter how hard you try to regulate your diet, the drinks you are used to consuming are actually harming your weight loss process. What’s even more challenging to most people is the fact that healthy alternatives in food and drinks usually taste quite blend which is one of the most frequent reason why people return to old habits of eating and drinking. Fortunately, you don’t have to choose between healthy, low calorie drinks and drinks that taste good. In order to help you stick to your healthy regiment, we have compiled a list of 10 flavored drinks you can drink and still not gain weight.

Instead of fruit juices that are high in sugar, why don’t you try vegetable juices instead? I promise they taste just as good!

In order to avoid fruit sugar, and still keep great flavor, you can opt for delicious vegetable juices that not only taste great, but can also help you lose some body fat.

Cucumber juice

Cucumber is high in water and it’s good for hydrating your body too!

One of the most refreshing beverages that actually aids the weight loss process by acting as a strong diuretic, cucumber juice is one of the best options when you want a flavored, refreshing, and toxin-removing drink.

Beetroot juice

Beetroot contains antioxidant and it’s good for your skin too!

Beetroot is known for being rich in healthy nutrients. By containing both soluble and insoluble dietary fiber, beetroot helps reducing body fat as it sustains proper bowel function. Beetroot juice provides a tasty and healthy alternative to sugary juices that turn into fat.

Wheatgrass juice

Wheatgrass is high in fibre and it’s can help to ease your digestion!

Wheatgrass is beneficial to weight loss since it not only acts as a great detoxifier, but it is only rich in fiber, which…

More Americans Are Giving Up on Losing Weight. Where Do We Go From Here?

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 16 percent of children in the US ages 6-19 years are overweight or obese, three times the amount since 1980. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Halfway through March those January resolutions are likely a fleeting memory, dreams of a prior person that would have been nice, if only. The very idea of annual change has become a recurring joke. Unfortunately so has one of most common resolutions: losing weight.

Only this joke isn’t funny for numerous Americans struggling with their weight. According to new research, more people are abandoning any hope of shedding pounds. Strangely, as obesity is becoming more socially accepted, more people are becoming more comfortable with it. Research authors at Georgia Southern University’s College of Public Health believe this phenomenon is playing a role in reducing motivation by lowering perceived markers of healthiness.

Weight is a complex topic. Over the last fourteen years I’ve worked with thousands of clients and students dealing with a range of body issues, weight and body image at the top. There is no silver bullet for eliminating obesity as genetics, nutrition, activity levels, stress, mental health, and environmental conditions all play a role.

Add to this the fact that the body mass index marker commonly used to measure obesity is flawed. Thin does not always equate to healthy, while many people who store a few extra pounds are in exceptional shape. Any time I tackle this subject the nuanced realities of divergent bodies and histories have to come into play. It’s not easy to come to terms with the fact that some people eat terribly and remain thin, but that doesn’t make it untrue. Having grown up overweight, I’m on the side that needs to eat very well and keep moving to maintain my health.

That said, this research is disturbing for a few reasons. While progress is definitely being made when we don’t perceive emaciated cover models and six-pack abs as the only vision of fitness—and when we stop fat shaming without recognizing the complex mechanisms of metabolism—there is no excuse for surrendering the quest for better health because more people believe we’re inherently an overweight animal.

A 2010 study in Obesity notes that while health benefits from improved body image are possible, the shift in perception also renders mute the…