Sugar

10 Utterly Flavorful Drinks You Can Drink All Day And Still Not Gain Weight.

As you embark upon a journey of weight loss you soon discover how many empty calories we all intake, and they don’t always come from food we eat. It can be quite frustrating to realize that no matter how hard you try to regulate your diet, the drinks you are used to consuming are actually harming your weight loss process. What’s even more challenging to most people is the fact that healthy alternatives in food and drinks usually taste quite blend which is one of the most frequent reason why people return to old habits of eating and drinking. Fortunately, you don’t have to choose between healthy, low calorie drinks and drinks that taste good. In order to help you stick to your healthy regiment, we have compiled a list of 10 flavored drinks you can drink and still not gain weight.

Instead of fruit juices that are high in sugar, why don’t you try vegetable juices instead? I promise they taste just as good!

In order to avoid fruit sugar, and still keep great flavor, you can opt for delicious vegetable juices that not only taste great, but can also help you lose some body fat.

Cucumber juice

Cucumber is high in water and it’s good for hydrating your body too!

One of the most refreshing beverages that actually aids the weight loss process by acting as a strong diuretic, cucumber juice is one of the best options when you want a flavored, refreshing, and toxin-removing drink.

Beetroot juice

Beetroot contains antioxidant and it’s good for your skin too!

Beetroot is known for being rich in healthy nutrients. By containing both soluble and insoluble dietary fiber, beetroot helps reducing body fat as it sustains proper bowel function. Beetroot juice provides a tasty and healthy alternative to sugary juices that turn into fat.

Wheatgrass juice

Wheatgrass is high in fibre and it’s can help to ease your digestion!

Wheatgrass is beneficial to weight loss since it not only acts as a great detoxifier, but it is only rich in fiber, which…

More Americans Are Giving Up on Losing Weight. Where Do We Go From Here?

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 16 percent of children in the US ages 6-19 years are overweight or obese, three times the amount since 1980. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Halfway through March those January resolutions are likely a fleeting memory, dreams of a prior person that would have been nice, if only. The very idea of annual change has become a recurring joke. Unfortunately so has one of most common resolutions: losing weight.

Only this joke isn’t funny for numerous Americans struggling with their weight. According to new research, more people are abandoning any hope of shedding pounds. Strangely, as obesity is becoming more socially accepted, more people are becoming more comfortable with it. Research authors at Georgia Southern University’s College of Public Health believe this phenomenon is playing a role in reducing motivation by lowering perceived markers of healthiness.

Weight is a complex topic. Over the last fourteen years I’ve worked with thousands of clients and students dealing with a range of body issues, weight and body image at the top. There is no silver bullet for eliminating obesity as genetics, nutrition, activity levels, stress, mental health, and environmental conditions all play a role.

Add to this the fact that the body mass index marker commonly used to measure obesity is flawed. Thin does not always equate to healthy, while many people who store a few extra pounds are in exceptional shape. Any time I tackle this subject the nuanced realities of divergent bodies and histories have to come into play. It’s not easy to come to terms with the fact that some people eat terribly and remain thin, but that doesn’t make it untrue. Having grown up overweight, I’m on the side that needs to eat very well and keep moving to maintain my health.

That said, this research is disturbing for a few reasons. While progress is definitely being made when we don’t perceive emaciated cover models and six-pack abs as the only vision of fitness—and when we stop fat shaming without recognizing the complex mechanisms of metabolism—there is no excuse for surrendering the quest for better health because more people believe we’re inherently an overweight animal.

A 2010 study in Obesity notes that while health benefits from improved body image are possible, the shift in perception also renders mute the…

11 Sweet Facts About Cadbury

To sugar-lovers stateside, Cadbury is best known as the maker of the cream-filled eggs that appear in stores each spring for Easter. But their full lineup of sweets includes close to 100 products that are beloved in the UK and around the world. Here are 11 decadent facts about the candy brand.

1. IT STARTED AS A DRINKING CHOCOLATE BUSINESS.

Cadbury advertisement from 1885. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Before it was an international corporation, Cadbury got its start as a humble grocery store. In 1824, John Cadbury opened a shop in Birmingham, England where he sold, among other goods, cocoa and drinking chocolate he ground by hand. The beverage was initially marketed as a health drink, and it was often served with lentils or barley mixed in. He opened up a full-fledged chocolate factory in 1841, and by the following year he was selling 11 types of cocoa and 16 varieties of drinking chocolate. Solid “eating chocolate” only came about years later as a way for the company to utilize the cocoa butter left over from the cocoa-making process.

2. CADBURY MADE CHOCOLATE FOR QUEEN VICTORIA.

The Cadbury company was just a few decades old when it was deemed fit for royalty. John Cadbury and his brother and business partner, Benjamin, received a Royal Warrant to assume the role of “manufacturers of cocoa and chocolate to Queen Victoria” in 1855. Today the company continues to hold a Royal Warrant from Queen Elizabeth II.

3. THE COMPANY INVENTED THE HEART-SHAPED CHOCOLATE BOX.

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Heart-shaped chocolate boxes are nearly as old as the commercialization of Valentine’s Day itself, and that’s thanks to Richard Cadbury. By the mid-19th century, exchanging gifts and cards with loved ones had become a popular practice around the holiday. Chocolate became part of the tradition by way of Cadbury’s romantic chocolate boxes. Richard, son of company founder John Cadbury, had the brilliant idea to package his confections in heart-shaped boxes embellished with cupids and roses in 1861. Customers could use the fancy boxes to store keepsakes long after the contents were consumed.

4. “RATION CHOCOLATE” WAS SOLD DURING WORLD WAR II.

Like many European businesses, Cadbury was forced to make sacrifices during the Second World War. When the British government banned fresh milk in 1941, the company stopped production on its Dairy Milk bars. Ration Chocolate, made from dried skim milk powder, was released as a cheap substitute.

5. THE FIRST CADBURY EGG APPEARED IN THE 19TH CENTURY.

Cadbury factory workers decorating Easter eggs in 1932. Image credit: Getty

Cadbury’s connection to chocolate…

How Much Sugar Do You Think Is in Your Pizza?

As researchers and nutrition experts begin to discoverand admit—how bad sugar is for the body, there’s more awareness of just how much sugar is contained in some of our favorite foods, even the ones that we think of as savory, not sweet. As Co.Exist reports, Antonio Rodríguez Estrada’s photography project sinAzucar (“sugar free”) aims to illustrate how much sugar is in the food we eat in a way that people understand—with sugar cubes.

Each cube is worth 4 grams of sugar. The World Health Organization and other experts recommend that you only eat about 25 grams of added sugar a day, by some counts. Some health groups allow for a little more, like the UK’s National Health Service (30 grams) or the FDA’s proposed 50 gram maximum—which may or may not have been influenced by the powerful Sugar Lobby, which has fought anti-sugar research for decades, including opposing the new “added sugars” designation on nutrition labels. From a health standpoint, the less sugar, the better. Ideally, you should really only be eating a little more than six sugar cubes over the course of your day. Some of Estrada’s photographs show more than that in just one food.

Depressing as they are, some of the images are pretty obvious. Four Chips Ahoy! cookies (if you can manage to eat…

Nestlé Creates Technology to Use Less Sugar in Chocolate

This week, the BBC reports, Nestlé announced that its researchers have discovered a way to restructure sugar. This will allow company confectioners to reduce the sweet stuff in chocolate products by as much as 40 percent, they claim.

Chocolate candy isn’t the biggest source of sugar in the average American’s diet (that would be soda), and for the most part, people know they’re not doing their bodies any favors by eating it. But since recent studies link added sugars in foods to an increased risk for obesity, Type 2 diabetes, and heart disease, confectioners have new incentive to provide customers with reduced sugar options. Until now, a tricky question remained: Could they do so without sacrificing flavor?