Terms of service

How to Report Someone on Snapchat

Snapchat, by its very nature, makes it very hard to deal with abuse. Unlike Facebook posts or Tweets, Snaps vanish in seconds and aren’t stored on Snapchat’s servers. If someone is posting something that violates Snapchat’s Terms of Service to their Story, it will stick around for 24 hours but that’s it. If a Snap is gone and it’s your word against someone else’s, there’s not a lot the Snapchat review team can do.

Still, with the caveat that things can be tricky, let’s look at how to report someone on Snapchat.

Unlike most other social networks, you can’t actually report posts or users from within the Snapchat app. Instead, you have to use the Support Site.

How to Report Someone on Snapchat

Snapchat, by its very nature, makes it very hard to deal with abuse. Unlike Facebook posts or Tweets, Snaps vanish in seconds and aren’t stored on Snapchat’s servers. If someone is posting something that violates Snapchat’s Terms of Service to their Story, it will stick around for 24 hours but that’s it. If a Snap is gone and it’s your word against someone else’s, there’s not a lot the Snapchat review team can do.

Still, with the caveat that things can be tricky, let’s look at how to report someone on Snapchat.

Unlike most other social networks, you can’t actually report posts or users from within the Snapchat app. Instead, you have to use the Support Site.

How to Report a Facebook Post

While Facebook is more personal than Twitter—you’re less likely to get into a shouting match with a random, anonymous stranger—it isn’t without its problems. Since everyone is using their real names, or at least real identities, it’s easier for abuse to get more personal.

Facebook’s Terms of Service ban any bullying, abuse, and harassment; people also aren’t allowed post any content that is threatening or contains hate speech, nudity, or violence. Other than that, though, people are free to post pretty much whatever they want. Just because you don’t agree with something, doesn’t mean it’s not allowed on Facebook. If, however, you’re sure it breaches the Terms of Service, here’s how to report a Facebook post.

Find the post you want to report on Facebook. I’m using this innocent post from my colleague Justin.

How to Report a Post on Instagram

Instagram has pretty clear terms of service: no harassment, nudity, violence, copyright violation, hate speech, and so on. If it’s something that’s too offensive, Instagram doesn’t want it on their service.

Obviously they can’t police every post, so Instagram relies on users to report any posts that violate their guidelines. If a post gets reported, it gets reviewed by Instagram’s community review team. If they agree that it’s inappropriate, the post will be removed and the account might get banned especially after repeated infringements.

First, find the post that you’ve got an issue with. I’m just using this post as an example. Click the three little dots…

Unroll.me Has Been Selling Your Email Data—Here’s How to Make it Stop

There’s a familiar saying in the tech world: If you’re not paying, you’re the product. Which means, if you’re not paying to use a service, the company providing it has to be profiting in a different way, and that’s usually by selling the data it collects on its users to third parties. This is perfectly legal—you give the company permission to do so by signing off on its terms of service. As The Intercept highlighted earlier this week, the latest tech company to catch flak for giving away data on its often unwitting customers is Unroll.me, a service that helps you organize and unsubscribe from email newsletters. If you’re a user, it’s probably time you revoked its access to your information. But doing so, unfortunately, is a little more complicated than just deleting your account on the site.

The initial revelation came out as part of a New York Times profile on Uber CEO Travis Kalanick, which revealed that Uber bought information on Unroll.me users from a data analytics…

Does Facebook Own My Photos?

Like clockwork, every couple of months some “fact” about Facebook goes viral. Facebook is going to start charging you money! Copy and paste this status or Facebook will cook your children! As soon as you upload them, Facebook owns your photos!

That last one is especially common, so let’s talk about it.

What Rights Does Facebook Have to Your Photos?

Let’s start by getting on the same basic page: no, Facebook doesn’t own your photos. That’s not how copyright or real life works. They’re still your photos, not Facebook’s. In fact, it’s right in Facebook’s terms of service: “You own all of the content and information you post on Facebook.“

Got it? Good. Myth busted. Now let’s address what rights Facebook does have with your photos once you upload them. Here’s the relevant bit of the terms of service:

You own all of the content and information you post on Facebook, and you can control how it is shared through your privacy and application settings. In addition:

  1. For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos (IP content), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (IP License). This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it.
  2. When you delete IP content, it is deleted in a manner similar…

Unroll.me is Selling Your Information, Here’s an Alternative

Have you ever used Unroll.me, the web service that helps you unsubscribe from newsletters in bulk? If so, your emails have been scanned by that company and sold to third parties including Uber. There’s a chance they’re scanning your emails right now.

If you want to switch tabs right now and remove third-party access to your email account, I don’t blame you. It’s the first thing I did when I found out. Come back when you’re ready, though, because I know you’re curious how Uber is involved.

You might be aware that Uber is having, shall we a say, a difficult few months in the public relations department. The latest incident is a New York Times profile of CEO Travis Kalanick, which reveals the company was fingerprinting iPhones against Apple’s terms of service—Apple CEO Tim Cook reportedly threatened to pull Uber out of the App Store altogether over it. That’s what made headlines yesterday, but scroll down a little further and you’ll find this tidbit about a company called Slice Intelligence, which Uber hired to do market research.

“Using an email digest service it owns named Unroll.me, Slice collected its customers’ emailed Lyft receipts from their inboxes and sold the anonymized data to Uber,” the article states.

We Got Played

I used Unroll.me many years ago. If you’re anything like me, a few things came to mind after reading about this.

  • Wait…Unroll.me is owned by a market research company? When did that happen?
  • That company scans people inboxes for reasons other than finding newsletters?
  • Does this thing still have access to my emails?

When I first started using Unroll.me, it was a two-person startup. I had no idea the service was still enabled on my Gmail account all these years later, and I had no idea that a market research company with a villainous name had since bought the service.

I’ll admit it: I got played. I feel betrayed. And I’m not the only one.

@nickoneill @Unrollme @johnsheehan Wow, I’ve been using @Unrollme for years, this is very unsettling. Looks like it’s back to the old Gmail filters. Not cool…

— Robbie Jack (@devevangelist) April 23, 2017

I apologize to whomever I’ve recommended @Unrollme to over the past couple of years

— Dvir Volk (@dvirsky) April 24, 2017

An uproar against Unroll.me quickly surged, and with good reason.

Is This Legal?

This is completely legal. Unroll.me doesn’t exactly go out of its way to advertise that it’s selling anonymized information from your inbox to third parties, but the information is there for anyone willing to dig for it. The Unroll.me privacy page specifically allows…