Uninstaller

How to Manually Back Up Your Steam Game Files

Steam has a built-in system for making a backup of its game files, so you don’t have to re-download a full game every time you uninstall it and want to play again later. But like a lot of Steam’s features, it hasn’t been updated in quite a while, and frankly it often manages to break the game restoration process anyway. On top of that, it’s slow, it’s clunky, and you can do better on your own.

Manually copying the files out of Steam’s game folder, then copying them back when you’re ready to play again, is much faster and more reliable. Steam’s caching system means that doing it yourself has no disadvantage versus the program’s integrated tool. If you’d like to back up your game files separately, especially to an external drive for archiving a large, 100GB+ collection or saving space on your primary system backup, here’s how to do it the easy way.

Step One: Find the Game Files

Find your standard Steam game installation folder. By default in Windows, this is located in:

C:/Program Files (x86)/Steam/steamapps/common

In macOS, open the Finder and choose Go > Go to Folder from the menu bar, entering this path:

~Library/Application Support/Steam/SteamApps/common

And in Linux-based operating systems, it’s in the following your local user directory:

~/.local/share/Steam/steamapps/common

This folder is divided into sub-folders, one for each game installed under Steam’s master game list. Most of them share the same name as their respective game, but some use alternate titles or abbreviations—for example, Age of Empires II HD Edition is shortened to “Age2HD.”

Remember, if you’ve set a custom game folder in Steam, your games will be installed elsewhere.

Step Two: Back Up the Games

To back up the games in the Steam common folder, just copy and paste them into another folder.

That’s it. Really, it’s that simple. Ideally, you want…

How to Upgrade Firefox from 32-bit to 64-bit in Windows Without Reinstalling

Most web browsers are installed in Windows as 64-bit versions by default, Firefox being the exception. If you installed the default download of Firefox, you have the 32-bit version, not the 64-bit version, even if you’re running a 64-bit version of Windows.

Say you recently got a new Windows computer. After installing the 32-bit version of Firefox from the main page, you installed your favorite add-ons, restored your backed up bookmarks, and even set up multiple profiles for personal and work purposes. But, now you want to upgrade to the 64-bit version of Firefox for better performance. You could uninstall the 32-bit version and then install the 64-bit version, but doing so will remove your Firefox user data, such as saved passwords, bookmarks, settings, extensions, and themes.

Windows 10 Super Sale
Windows 10 Pro Genuine Digital Download For Just $39.95. Buy Now! Go to gamecheap.com

You could back up your profile folders from the 32-bit version of Firefox and then restore them after uninstalling Firefox and installing the 64-bit version. But that’s a bit of a hassle, and there is an easier way.

NOTE: Firefox 64-bit can only be installed on 64-bit Windows. If you’re not sure which version of Windows you’re running, you can easily check. If you’re running 32-bit Windows, you cannot upgrade Firefox to 64-bit.

If you’re not sure if you’re running 32-bit or 64-bit Firefox,…