Weather

Jupiter gets Surprisingly Complex New Portrait

Scientists are repainting Jupiter’s portrait — scientifically, anyway. NASA’s Juno spacecraft swooped within 5,000 kilometers (3,100 miles) of Jupiter’s cloud tops last August 27. Scientists’ first close-up of the gas giant has unveiled several unexpected details about the planet’s gravity and powerful magnetic fields. They also give a new view of the planet’s auroras and ammonia-rich weather systems.

Researchers need to revamp their view of Jupiter, these findings suggest. They even challenge ideas about how solar systems form and evolve. The findings come from two papers published May 26 in Science.

“We went in with a preconceived notion of how Jupiter worked,” says Scott Bolton. “And I would say we have to eat some humble pie.” Bolton is a planetary scientist who leads the Juno mission. He works at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas.

Scientists thought that beneath its thick clouds, Jupiter would be uniform and boring. Not anymore. “Jupiter is much more complex deep down than anyone anticipated,” Bolton now observes.

One early surprise came from Jupiter’s gravity. Juno measured that gravity from its tug on the spacecraft. The values suggest that Jupiter doesn’t have a solid, compact core. Instead, the core is probably large and diffuse. It could even be as big as half the planet’s radius, Bolton and his colleagues conclude. “Nobody anticipated that,” Bolton notes.

Imke de Pater is a planetary scientist. She works at the University of California, Berkeley and was not involved in the new studies. The…

How to Get a Schedule for Your Ideal Weather Conditions in Weather Underground

If you want to know when the perfect time would be to go for a nice stroll around the neighborhood, you can use Weather Underground’s Smart Forecasts. This feature lets you put together a list of ideal weather conditions, and it will show you the times throughout the day that those conditions will be met. Here’s how to set it up.

Of course, you could just look outside and decide for yourself if it’s a nice time to go for a walk, but if you’re curious about the conditions later in the day, Smart Forecasts will let you know when the perfect time will be. Plus, you can have it take into account different factors like wind speed and humidity.

To start, download the Weather Underground app if you don’t have it already. It’s free and available for iOS and Android devices.

Open up the app and scroll down until you reach the “Smart Forecasts” section. If you scroll to the right, you’ll see a handful of outdoor activities. Select one for the activity that you want, or tap on “Create Your Own”, which is what I’m going to do for total customization.

Start off by giving the Smart Forecast a name.

How to Add Weather Information to the Top Panel in Ubuntu

Modern operating systems offer weather information out-of-the-box. There’s Windows 10’s weather app, and the Notification Center on macOS. But Ubuntu doesn’t come with anything like this.

No matter: you can install something yourself fairly quickly. We’ve found two applications that add the current temperature to Ubuntu’s top panel: My Weather Indicator, which a lot of weather detail, and Simple Weather Indicator, which as you might imagine offers only the basics. Here’s how to install and use both.

My Weather Indicator: Lots of Information and Features

The somewhat confusingly-named My Weather Indicator puts the current temperature in Ubuntu’s top panel. Installing My Weather Indicator isn’t hard, if you know how to install third party PPAs in Ubuntu. Open the Terminal, then run the following commands.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:atareao/atareao sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install my-weather-indicator

The first command adds the atareao PPA to your system; the second updates your package manager; the third installs the indicator. When everything is done, you can find the new indicator by opening the Dash and searching for “Weather.”

When you first run the program, you’ll want to set a location. Click the indicator, then hit the Preferences button near the bottom.

This will open the preferences window, where you can opt to automatically determine your current location or enter a location manually. Up…

Ötzi the mummified Iceman actually froze to death

Ötzi

NEW ORLEANS, La. — In 1991, hikers in the high Alps along the Austrian-Italian border discovered the remains of a man frozen in the ice for some 5,300 years. What had killed this man — nicknamed, Ötzi (OOT-see) the Iceman — has remained a mystery. A new analysis comes to a fairly simple conclusion: It was the weather.

“Freezing to death is quite likely the main cause of death in this classic cold case,” reports Frank Rühli. An anthropologist, he works at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. Ötzi had been a Copper Age hunter-gatherer. And it appears that the extreme cold killed him within anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours. Rühli shared his team’s new assessment April 20, here, at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.

Ötzi had a range of injuries. In fact, some analyses had hinted he might have been the earliest known murder victim. After all, he had been shot. A stone arrowhead remained in his left shoulder. He also had a series of head wounds.

Researchers have now subjected his remains to new forensic analyses. These included X-rays and CT scans. They show the stone weapon did not penetrate far into the shoulder. It ruptured a blood vessel but caused no major damage, Rühli reports. There was internal bleeding. It totaled only about 100 milliliters,…

Ötzi the mummified Iceman actually froze to death

Ötzi

NEW ORLEANS, La. — In 1991, hikers in the high Alps along the Austrian-Italian border discovered the remains of a man frozen in the ice for some 5,300 years. What had killed this man — nicknamed, Ötzi (OOT-see) the Iceman — has remained a mystery. A new analysis comes to a fairly simple conclusion: It was the weather.

“Freezing to death is quite likely the main cause of death in this classic cold case,” reports Frank Rühli. An anthropologist, he works at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. Ötzi had been a Copper Age hunter-gatherer. And it appears that the extreme cold killed him within anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours. Rühli shared his team’s new assessment April 20, here, at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.

Ötzi had a range of injuries. In fact, some analyses had hinted he might have been the earliest known murder victim. After all, he had been shot. A stone arrowhead remained in his left shoulder. He also had a series of head wounds.

Researchers have now subjected his remains to new forensic analyses. These included X-rays and CT scans. They show the stone weapon did not penetrate far into the shoulder. It ruptured a blood vessel but caused no major damage, Rühli reports. There was internal bleeding. It totaled only about 100 milliliters,…