Wi-Fi

How to Configure a Proxy Server on Android

Android allows you to configure proxy settings for each Wi-Fi network. This is sometimes required to access the Internet on a business or school network, for example. Your browser traffic will be sent through the proxy you configure.

The proxy you configure will be used by Chrome and other web browsers, but may not be used by other apps. Each app developer can choose whether it uses Android’s proxy or not. That’s another good reason why you should use a VPN instead of a proxy. WIth a VPN, you can force all app’s network traffic through the VPN connection. It’s a better way to hide your IP address or access geoblocked websites that aren’t available in your country.

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This process is the same for all modern versions of Android, from Android 4.0 through 7.1. Some device manufacturers change the way Android’s Settings screen looks and functions, so you may find your Wi-Fi or proxy settings in a slightly different location.

Open Android’s Settings app and tap “Wi-Fi” to view a list of Wi-Fi networks.

Long-press the name of the Wi-Fi network you want to change the proxy settings for. Tap “Modify Network” when a menu appears.

If you haven’t already connected to the Wi-Fi network, you’ll need to connect to the Wi-Fi network and enter its passphrase before…

The Easiest Way to Fix Wi-Fi Issues: Move Your Router (Seriously)

Are there Wi-Fi dead zones in your house? Before you do anything drastic, you might be able to fix it by simply moving your router.

This sounds fake, because Wi-Fi seems like magic—something that can only be made better by wizards who understand its mysterious ways. But Wi-Fi isn’t magic. Your laptop and iPad connect to the Internet using a century old technology: radio waves.

And radio waves have limits. If you drive through a tunnel with the FM radio on, you’ll mostly hear a bunch of static. This is because the signal from the radio tower can’t reach you underground. There are barriers that block the signal.

The same principle applies to your Wi-Fi: barriers between your router and your devices make the signal worse. So the physical placement of your device makes a startlingly big difference in your signal across the house.

Place Your Router in the Center of Your House

If you drop a pebble in a still pond, ripples move out from the impact point in all directions.

That’s more or less how radio waves work: they emanate from a central point, in all directions. Remember this when you place your router: imagine ripples moving out from the router in all directions.

With that in mind, the ideal position for your router should be as close to the middle of your house as possible. If your router is in one far corner of your house, you’re sending most of the “ripples” outside, where they aren’t really doing anything for you; meanwhile, the corner of your house furthest from the router is just picking up diminished ripples (or nothing). Put your router in the middle of the house to get equal coverage everywhere.

And remember to think three dimensionally, too. In a three-story house, it’s probably best to put the router on the second floor, assuming you want good signal on all three stories.