Window (computing)

Magnet for Mac Is the Window Management Tool I’ve Desperately Needed

We’ve seen a few different tools for Windows-esque window management on Mac over the years, but none of those ever fit well with my workflow. Magnet is an app that’s been around for a while, but a few recent updates have finally made it the app I need.

At a glance, Magnet ($4.99, but it’s on sale right now for 99¢) is like any window snapping tool. You can organize windows neatly side-by-side, in fullscreen, quarters, thirds, or any combination of those you want. You can manage windows by dragging them, setting up keyboard shortcuts, or by using the menu bar. This alone is helpful for someone like me, who typically has dozens of windows open of varying sizes all stacked in a disorganized way that makes me spend more time in the app switcher than I’d like. If I do ever bother to manually resize a window, it’s usually just to make it large enough to peak out from another stack of apps.

What sets Magnet apart from other options is the sheer amount of polish. It doesn’t get confused by multiple displays (and in fact supports up to six external displays) and you can customize the keyboard shortcuts to suit your needs. It also supports any combination of window areas. For example, you can cram one window in the top right, another in the bottom right, then expand one window to take up the other half of the screen. Magnet also just added options for left/center/right thirds, which turns out to be the feature I was truly waiting for.

What’s especially nice about Magnet is that it doesn’t force any specific move set on you. Whether you’re a keyboard shortcut type of person, a menu person, or a mouse person, you can make user of Magnet. Let’s take a look at how all of these different options look in action.

Organize Windows…

How to Check if You Are Running a 32-bit or 64-bit Version of Firefox

Firefox is available in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions for Windows 7, 8, and 10. If you’re curious which version you’re running, we’ll show a couple of easy ways to find out.

Using the About Firefox Box

The simplest method for finding this information is opening the About Firefox box. However, before continuing, be aware that opening the About Firefox box causes Firefox to automatically update, if there’s an available update. So, if you’d rather not update Firefox right now, skip to the next section for another easy method.

To check if Firefox is 32-bit or 64-bit using the About Firefox box, click the Firefox menu in the upper-right corner of the window and then click the Help icon at the bottom of the menu.

On the Help pane that slides out, click the “About Firefox” option.

How to Record Your Desktop and Create a Screencast on Windows

recording-video-camera

Screencasting can seem a bit daunting at first, but there are a few good free ways to do it.

The Game DVR feature in Windows 10 can create a video of your desktop. Technically it was just designed for capturing gameplay, and other software does a much better job—but it’ll work in a pinch if you need it. If you want something more powerful, Open Broadcaster Software (OBS) is a good free program that will do everything you need, but you’ll need a few minutes to learn its interface.

Record Your PC or Mac’s Screen the Easy Way with Camtasia

If you want to create a screen recording with the most powerful, full-featured solution on the market, you’re looking for Camtasia. It’s a complete solution that lets you create amazing screencasts with effects and high-quality editing.

Whether you are trying to make lessons, tutorials, or demos, Camtasia is the best solution on the market. You can record your webcam simultaneously to explain what the viewer is looking at, or you can add any video separately and edit inline.

Quick and Easy: Windows 10’s Game DVR

We recommend skipping Game DVR and going straight to the OBS section below. But, if you want quickly record any application’s window without any third-party software, you can do it on Windows 10. This relies on the Game DVR feature, which is designed for capturing PC gameplay—but which can capture any application’s window.

To do this, just press Windows+G in any application on Windows 10. The Game Bar will appear. Select “Yes, this is a game” even if the application isn’t a game.

If the Game Bar doesn’t appear when you press this key combination, you might have disabled it in the past. Head to the Xbox app on your system and ensure the “Game DVR” feature is enabled.

Click the red “Start Recording” button to start recording that application window.

An overlay will appear at the top right corner of the window while you’re recording. You can toggle your microphone on or off by clicking the microphone icon. Windows will also record the sound playing on your PC and include it with the the saved clip.

Click the square-shaped “Stop” button when you’re done.

Windows will save your clip to C:\Users\NAME\Videos\Captures in MP4 format. There you go.

More Powerful and Customizable: Open Broadcaster Software

We recommend using Open Broadcaster Software (OBS) for screencasts. It’s completely free and open-source and allows you to both stream live and record a screencast to a video file. It works with Windows 7, 8, and 10.

You’ll just see a black screen in the preview pane the first time you fire up OBS. That’s because you haven’t added a source. OBS uses “scenes” and “sources” to assemble your video. The scene is the final video or stream—what your viewers see. The sources are what comprise that video.

You can stick with the single scene OBS provides, but you’ll need to add one or more sources to it.

How to Record Your Entire Display

To record your entire display—that is, everything that appears on your screen—right-click inside the Sources box at the bottom of the window and select Add > Display Capture.

Name the source whatever you like and click “OK”.

You’ll see a preview of your display. If you have multiple displays connected to your PC, you can choose…

How to Disable Message Previews in Windows 10 Mail

By default, Windows 10’s Mail app displays the first line of each email in addition to the subject line. If you don’t want this preview text to show, you can easily turn it off.

Maybe you work in public places, or maybe you have nosy family and friends. Whatever the reason, if you don’t want others seeing the content of your emails, we’ll show you how to hide the preview text. Mail also has a preview pane that you can hide as well.

To disable the message preview text, click the “Settings” icon in the lower-left corner of the Mail window.

Click…