Jordan Peterson on gun control


  • Shortly after the Las Vegas shooting, Jordan Peterson replied to a question about gun control in America.
  • Peterson believes only the police and army being armed is dangerous, and that the citizenry should be equally dangerous.
  • He also feels that legislation would do “zero” to stop school shootings in America.

In 2016, 64 percent of homicides in the United States resulted from gun violence; in Canada, the number was 30.5 percent the year prior. England and Wales posted much lower numbers during those two years: just 4.5 percent of deaths resulted from guns.

We’re drowning in statistics. More charts likely exist explaining gun violence in America than any other topic. Each one highlights the same issue: Americans have issues. This we know. When those issues involve firearms, we’re particularly ready to claim the American promise of being “number one.” No longer do we dominate in education, quality of life, happiness, life expectancy, or health care. But guns, we’ve got them.

The reasons are manifold; no one denies that. Speculating over why so many guns are fired in this country is useless. But that doesn’t stop some people from trying.

When asked if the right to bear arms is equivalent to free speech, Jordan Peterson replies that nothing is as essential as the right to free speech. His father, a hunter, collected 200 single-shot rifles because “he believes in aiming carefully.” Northwestern Canada, Peterson continues, is a rural, hunting culture, where “people take their guns seriously.”

The right to bear arms, he continues, is an integral part of a free society. If only the police and army are “allowed to be dangerous,” there’s going to be problems. He attempts to end his response there, then reconsiders.

Jordan Peterson: Las Vegas Shooting and Gun Control

This video is shot in the wake of the Las Vegas shooting on October 1, 2017, in which a lone gunman fired over 1,100 rounds into the Route 91 Harvest music festival. After killing 58 people and injuring another 851, the gunman killed himself. This was the deadliest mass shooting by a single individual in U.S. history.

Peterson notes that gun legislation debates kick off after incidents such as this, with “each side” hunkering down in their corner, refusing to budge. He continues,

“I think that it’s unfortunate to use an event like the Las Vegas shooting or the Columbine shooting to make political capital.”

It is Peterson’s belief that it is a right that the individual should be “allowed or even encouraged to be dangerous, but…

Marcela
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Marcela

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COO @oneqube | Angel Investor | Proud mom | Advisor @TheTutuProject | Let's Go #NYRangers
Marcela
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